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Beautiful design, Morning owl look amazing.

This embroidery work up perfectly and stitch out nicely. 
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Excellent stitches and original style

Stitched out beautifully! Looked amazing and no issues!
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Loving birds.. Wonderful designs, stitched out beautifully

Really cute, You love this when you stitched it. Would love more of same designs.
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Our designs looks great

Stitched out beautifully! Wonderful decoration!
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Adorable design. Stitches out beautifully.

"Thanks so much for this design It's lovely and stitched out beautifully on leather."
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News about machine embroidery software and digitizing.

Entries in this blog

 

Problem Embroid a file from Embroideres.com

Hi all, I try embroid a minie file buyed on Embroidery designs collection shop in my new embroidery Brother Innovis-NV800E with hoop 260x160 and the border of pictures  and the colours doesn't match.  When I buy the minie file, it was possible download a "winnie the pooh" free file and when also I try embroid pooh file happens the same of minie file To Embroid I used the pes file, but i also try pec and phc files and happen the sames always. Exist any problem with the files? or exist any configuration i have wrong on my machine?,  Anyone know what could be the problem? thanks for the help, Paulo Monteiro

pjlmonteiro

pjlmonteiro

 

Embroidery Stabilizers: Do You Really Need Them All?

Original text by: Marina Belova I have once written a guide to all sorts of embroidery stabilizers (fusible interfacing materials) for manual embroidery. As we all know, the market is full of such auxiliary materials, which can be helpful to an embroiderer. Nevertheless, in these days I often think that not all of them are useful for me in my day-to-day work.  In the past I used to buy a lot of stabilizers of various brands, to see if they could be really helpful. I liked some of them and disliked the others; there were also certain products that I didn't know how and where to use even after having read the manual. In the course of time, after I gained some experience, it turned out that 3 or 4 types of stabilizer were sufficient for me to make a good embroidery. They really are enough for everything I embroider lately.  I'll show you what stabilizers I use for all routine projects and all types of fabric. I must specify though that the projects I do are rather simple: standard promotional designs on knitwear, terry cloth, occasionally caps, also ordinary materials like diagonal, coarse calico, two-thread cloth, sometimes the materials used in interior design, fore example silks and velvets of varying quality.  So, here's my basic embroidery stabilizer kit: 1.   Heavy-weight cutaway stabilizer (I wouldn't call it tearaway, like most of the sellers, because it doesn't tear that good), made in China. Density circa 60 g/m2. This stabilizer has a strongly pronounced fiber orientation, which isn't always good. Works fine for knitwear. Here it is: 2.   Medium weight cutaway stabilizer (some consider it tearaway) made in China or Turkey, density 35-40 g/m2. In my kit there is a cutaway stabilizer of 2 different brands, with and without fiber orientation (the last is my personal favorite). I use them for medium-level projects and ordinary textiles. Photo: an example of a stabilizer with single fiber orientation: And this is the one without any orientation: 3. A tearaway paper-like stabilizer, density circa 60 g/m2. It resembles recycled paper because it looks just as specked and non-uniform. I also have a punched-out variation of this paper, which also tears away easily. As it turned out, it comes in very handy when embroidering a design on terry cloth. But this paper-like stabilizer (and not only this one), as experience has shown, may be replaced by ordinary printing paper, which I sometimes do when it fits the size of design.  I rarely use other types of stabilizers, and usually as supplementary ones. 4. Thin water soluble film — a stabilizer topping for pile textiles, prevents the problem with pile piercing through the stitches. Nevertheless, I rarely use this film, too, but instead replace it with a stretch wrap or a plastic bag. I tested all the these materials in order to find a substitution for the expensive water soluble stabilizers, as I have already written. Water soluble stabilizers are used for lace and cutwork. There are also other types of auxiliary materials I use from time to time: Temporary spray adhesive Paper adhesive tape Double-sided adhesive tape And that's all there is to it. I don't keep a large variety of stabilizers. No spunbond, no heat away backing, no sticky backing paper-like filmoplast or other sticky embroidery stabilizers — I don't buy or use any of those. And even if I did buy some of them in the past, it was only for the purpose of examining them, because all these stabilizers can be replaced by their less expensive analogs. You can' have them all. Besides, if you embroidered on velvet using filmoplast as a stabilizer, it would turn out a real disaster, because filmoplast has a habit of taking the pile out, and it peels off easily, too. You have to be extremely careful with the projects that require a great number of stitches. Double-sided adhesive tape also tends to peel off the fabric.  Sometimes I think that everything new that pops up on the market is made with one goal in sight, and that is to induce customers to buy more and more materials. This happens because stabilizers become more and more differentiated, and not because they work better. It seems to me that the resulting embroidery is not always in connection with the price of a stabilizer and the innovations used in its making. What it depends upon is the quality of the design and the accuracy of hooping. Generally speaking, the resulting embroidery will be in strong connection with your experience in design making as well as handling different types of fabric and the embroidery machine.  Remember the general rule: the thinner the fabric, the thicker the stabilizer, however strange it might seem. You will get very soft lace using thermogaze, but it leaves residue which does not come off easily.  What stabilizers do you use in your work?

Irina

Irina

 

Embroidery techniques: cutwork with alignment

Original text by: Olga Ionova This master-class will tell you how to do cutwork embroidery. Cutwork embroidery has its own aspects, and if the design is beyond the hoop so that you have to join its parts together, the amount of the aspects doubles. This master-class will tell you how to do cutwork with alignment and border designs without the special hoop, but with the help of alignment stitches instead.  Cutwork embroidery. Materials: •    Fabric or an item to be embroidered 
•    Tearaway stabilizer 
•    Water soluble stabilizer (film)
•    Upper thread (white)
•    Underthread (white) Cutwork embroidery. The making process Prepare your fabric. Iron it and press the tearaway adhesive to the wrong side.  In keeping with the design do the marking. Mark the fabric in accordance with the plastic pattern of your hoop.  Tightly hoop the fabric and the stabilizer. You can add pins, too. Cutwork embroidery design must include several colors, which will mark the places for your machine to stop.  The first color will be a Ran stitch, also zigzag may be added. Having embroidered the first color, stop the machine and take the hoop off. Marked are the areas that will be cut out. These are always enclosed areas.  Don't unhoop the fabric! It must stay in the hoop.  With the help of scissors cut away the areas inside the objects from the stitching, trying not to damage it. Use the stork embroidery scissors or the ones that were specially designed for cutwork.  Put a layer of thin water soluble stabilizer on top of the fabric and secure it with pins. Set you hoops in your machine run the embroidery with the second color.  The embroidery consists of finishing the open areas with zigzag stitches and later with satin columns, while water soluble stabilizer is used as a substitute for the fabric. It holds the fabric and the cut-away details together.  The order of cutting and finishing depends upon the programmed sequence. The details here should be cut away and embroidered one after the other.  Embroider all the details as was described above.  Embroider all the elements of the design.  Cutwork embroidery. The alignment of the elements  When embroidering borders or repetitive design patterns you have to do the alignment. Therefore, draw the central line while doing the preparations. To get the exact match between the different parts the design must contain the alignment stitches and crosses (dots and lines). In the first part of the embroidery they are embroidered the last. The alignment spots marked violet on the photo.  If you add the alignment crosses by yourself (it can be done in any embroidery software editor), mark them with different color from that of the last part of the design.  You can mark the places where the needle will hit the alignment crosses by moving down the balance wheel, but not perforating the fabric. This works extremely good for leather.  The last part of the embroidery before next may include tacking down the first object of the part that will be hooped next. You can use this stitch as an additional alignment mark.  Cutwork embroidery. Rehooping  Take the embroidered detail out and press it flat, moving the iron carefully up and down. Never use steam!  Hoop the next part of the fabric to be embroidered in accordance with the marking and the hoop pattern.  Set you hoops in your machine and make sure that the first is the color of the alignment crosses. All alignment spots must match! You don't have to embroider them, just move the balance wheel down and see if the needle hits the marks.  After that the embroidery will go as was described above.  Having completed the embroidery, unhoop the fabric. Cut away the excessive water soluble stabilizer on both right and wrong side.  Tear away the tearaway adhesive stabilizer. Wash the water soluble stabilizer in the warm water until it will go off completely.  Dry the embroidery until it becomes only a bit wet.  Press your embroidery on something soft like a folded terry towel covered with a thin cloth. Press the embroidery flat in up and down motions only! Never move an iron side to side or back and force.  It's done!     

Irina

Irina

 

Digitizing Single Color Embroidery Designs


When learning to digitize half the battle is knowing how to use the tools and what tools to use to get a desired look. Whether you have a basic digitizing level or the highest level possible if you do not know how to use the different tools you are no further ahead. In this blog we look at using the basic tools, including the RUN tool, satin tool and fill tool. I consider these the most simple of design as your only using one tool. When you get a grasp for this tool then you can start adding additional types of strokes .. If you have a some punching tools usually you will have the most basic of stitch tools in Tajima Pulse they call it a RUN Stitch however its a basic stitch , you place the points and set the stitch length, If you can learn to punch embroidery designs with this you will be able to add more detail with fewer stitches, and if you get good at it you can make a whole embroidery design with no trims. Here is a simple outline of a cat and dog dancing in the rain. You should be able to digitize this embroidery design with just the run tool. I would set the stitch length between .07 and .10 sometimes shorted on smaller detailed areas. The run tool should produce a stitch similar to the one below , basically its gets tacked down by the bobbin embroidery thread at specified by the stitch length,.   In the Tajima Pulse branded embroidery software you have another option on some levels it called a manual stitch this allows you to control the stitch length as it makes a stitch when you place each point, this is also known as stitch by stitch digitizing and is considered old school as you have control of each stitch. When looking at the image shown above you need to start at a place and try to finish at another place, If your new to embroidery digitizing I recommend you get in the rabbit of punching from the bottom up, and out from the center, its usually not a problem for left chest design but caps require it to reduce the push of the embroidery design. If you do it on most of your embroidery design it won't seem like a problem when you punch designs for caps and jacket backs. You will see a graph on the image 1 this is how I mark my designs to give me reference lines. Some people can eye ball it with out the lines.   Above in image 3 you will see where I have placed my points there is no set way you have to draw it the only thing you have to try to do is to keep the stitch length above .02 inch going smaller sometime will automatically get truncated by the software, Here is what the embroidery stitches look like zoomed in and out images 4 and 5.   The smaller the stitch length the sharper the corners and the more detail however it also increase the number of stitches in the design, so generally its a balancing act, Some times you may need to retrace your steps , in order to minimize trims. Take your time, map it out if you can ,and omit any detail that is too small to reproduce, you may also need to place more gaps in between the stitches than what you would need if you were printing this. I recommend at least 1 to 1 1/2 stitch widths. Halfway point of the design Image 6   When your down punching the design Image 7 Now you should be able to compare image 1 and image 7 before and after to see if you like the amount of detail that you have added. Now you can take this design and if you want add some satin or fills to it. Image 8   Or you can go 1 step further and make it a full color designs or leave it at a one color design. If you sew out the outline version no fills, you only need to add underlay to the satin style of stitches, if you add the fills in you will need to add a contour stitch to the fills and a lattice to and add some compensation to the fills and satin stitches, the run style stitches or programmed runs do not need any underlay or compensation.   Author: Frank Prokator

diver361

diver361

 

Embroidery Tips n Tricks , Cap Challenges

Avoiding pit falls of working with Caps When dealing with your customers you may need to educate them on what the placement and size of the logo for your particular machine is, as often the customer will want the designs to be too large for the cap frame. Some cap frames can accommodate a 270 degree rotation and some only do 180 degrees, the height will depend on the hat. Rule 1 , Placement The designs should be places 1/2 inch above the brim of the hat this allows the needle to clear the metal bracket that holds the hat to the frame. Rule 2 , Size The size of the embroidery designs for the front for most hats should be less than 4.5 inches wide and no more than 2.75 inches high. Some caps will allow for larger areas. Rule 3 , Backing Its very important to have precut sheets of tearaway backing, I recommend buying in a roll and should be med to heavy tearaway for caps. Rules 4 , Embroidery Design The embroidery designs should be made for caps, this will eliminate the push of sewing to the middle. All text should be design to sew from the center out, ( In Tajima Pulse their a tab called sew direction for setting this ) The embroidery design should be made specific for hats. Rule 5 , Speed of machine I recommend slowing your machine down to 600 spm when embroidering on hats, this will help reduce distortion,. Rule 6 , Needles When working with hats you may experience higher number of needle breaks as some caps, like the flexfit caps seem to have a hard ridge in the center of six panel hats, using an 80/12 needle will eliminate some needle breaks. Ridge on Six Panel Caps When working with six panel hats that are structured and feel thick in the center of the hat , there are several methods for making it easier to embroider on. Method 1 Water With a spray bottle wet the front of the cap where your embroidery design is going to be, this will make the material more pliable and easier to work with. Method 2 Heat With a hat press you can pre-press the area where you need to put the embroidery logo on this will soften up the areas specially on the seams. Alternate Placement Brims Often you will get request to place logos on other areas of the hat, and you may have seen designs embroidered onto the brim of the hat, this is only available on custom hat orders where they embroider the design on the material before adding the brim and sewing the hat. Alternate Placement Sides of hats This various methods for placing logos on the side of hats, however your limited to the hoop fitting on the side often the brim will get in the way of hoop large than 3.5 inches, so your designs should be no large than 3 inches wide. You can get around this by using specialty hoops, Alternate Placement Back of Hats This can be done with a standard 4 inch hoop and works with a wide range of styles, Often you will need to arc your text to match the contour of the back of the hat depending on the style. Check with your hat vendor many of them will have a custom hat program or pre made hats with logos embroidered on them . Usually a minimum order is required for custom hats to be made. I deal with AJM International or Headwear and they both have custom hat programs.

diver361

diver361

 

The reasons for thread breakage on domestic embroidery machines

Original text by: unknown Every embroiderer has been in a situation where an embroidery machine that was running smoothly only a day before, suddenly begins to break the upper or the underthread almost every stitch. Such a problem, in case you eliminate the possibility of mechanical breakage, is connected with certain processes, and also with the quality of the embroidery materials you use in your work. If such a situation occurs, try to solve the problem yourself before calling a service engineer. In this article we tried to describe possible problems and their solutions, ranking from the easiest to the complex ones. Resume the embroidery process after having done this or that, to check if the problem has disappeared.  Why does the thread breakage occur  Upper thread  Underthread  Stabilizer  Needle  Shuttle  1. Upper thread Tension regulation. Check your upper thread tension. Often the reason for the thread breakage may be too tight a tension.  Wrong threading may be the reason for thread breakage, too. In this case rethread your machine in accordance with the manual.  An upper thread of poor quality. If breakage occurred after replacing the upper thread, get back the bobbin you used before that. If breakage stops, buy embroidery threads of some other brand. Rayon thread. This thread often causes thread breakage trouble for beginners. Threads literally "leap off" the bobbins. This problem is very easily solved. Place a grid on the bobbin case and reduce the embroidery speed.  Metallic thread. When working with this thread use a special grid, set a needle for metallic threads, and also reduce the embroidery speed.  2. Underthread  The wrong size of the bobbin. However strange it might seem, such a problem exists. Check your manual to see what type of the bobbin is recommended for your machine.  Wrong winding may become the reason for thread breakage, too. In this case unwind the bobbin and rewind it after that.  Wrong threading. One of the common reasons for thread breakage. Carefully read that section in the manual that describes how to insert the bobbin, and do accordingly.  Thread thickness. One of the well-known reasons for thread breakage. Some of the sewing-embroidery machines just won't work with a very thin bobbin thread. In this case you should get a thicker thread.  All sewing and embroidery threads have their own thickness, determined by the number. The greater the number is, the thinner is the thread, and vise versa. For example: An upper thread #200 is thinner than #30  3. Stabilizer  Glue particles adhere to the thread and the needle, holding back their movement, which causes the thread to break. If that's the case, stop the machine, clean the needle with alcohol, and rethread. Repeat every time your thread breaks until the embroidery will be completed. After that refrain from using this particular type of adhesive stabilizer or spray adhesive in your work.  On the internet you can find many recommendations on the original use of various materials. You can count the use of double adhesive tape and sewing stabilizers, which are not manufactured specifically for our purpose and may cause thread breakage. The problem itself, together with the solution, was described above.  If the cleaning does not help and the thread continues to break, stop the embroidery and change the stabilizer.  4. Needle  A bent needle, burrs and a blunt needlepoint may also be the reason for thread breakage. In this case change the needle to a new one.  Also if the needle type is wrong for the particular kind of fabric, this may lead to the thread breakage, too. Read the information on how to choose needles, in our future articles. 5. Shuttle In some embroidery machines the bobbin case used for the embroidery is different from the one used for sewing. If you have encountered the problem with thread breakage, check the one that is currently in use.  Burrs on the bobbin case are often the reason for the thread breakage. Take out the case and inspect it. If there are burrs and scratches present, polish them with a soft abrasive cloth. When it will be possible, buy a new bobbin case.  Scratches on the throat plate caused by the needles hitting it may lead to the thread breakage. Inspect the throat plate from above and from below, and if you find burrs and scratches there, think of buying a new one.     

Irina

Irina

 

How to align machine embroidery designs with lace

Original text by: Katya Ebber Your hoop is not one-size-fits-all. You become acutely aware of it when you need to embroider lace ribbons or edgings. This master-class will tell you how to align machine embroidery designs with lace so that the joining places could not be seen. This master-class shows working in the embroidery design software (creation of the alignment crosses), and also the embroidery process.  Preparing the design in Embird  Load a chosen machine embroidery design into Embird. Add the alignment stitches and half stitches at the top and the bottom of the design. Copy and flip them vertically. Having added the alignments stitches, change the order of steps in the embroidery, dragging the objects in the objects bar, and also change their color. The main objects should be located between the top and the bottom alignment stitches. Click 'Paste' in the toolbar. In the pop-up list choose 'Basting' and define the stitch length. After you click 'OK' the guide stitch will be added to specify the design's position in the hoop. How to align machine embroidery designs properly  Load the prepared design into your embroidery machine and embroider the first color, according to the chart you added in the software. Hoop the water soluble stabilizer and embroider the first design (001).  Alignment stitches are embroidered with the last color of the design. They will be used as marks for linking this part of the design with the next.  Having embroidered the first design, trim away the water soluble stabilizer near the embroidery.  Hoop water soluble stabilizer again and embroider first two colors of the design (the guide stitch and the alignment crosses). Remove the hoop from the machine and add a thin layer of spray adhesive. Using a short pin, join the center marks of the alignment crosses on the embroidery parts and on the water soluble stabilizer.  Do the alignment stitches without the thread to check if the hooping went right. If all the crosses and stitches match, begin the embroidery. If the alignment crosses do not match, repeat the alignment process as mentioned above. This method is good for many items where you need to embroider a repetitive pattern. We have embroidered lace today, but if you need to do the edging of the table cloth or curtain, this method will work just as good. Use tearaway non-adhesive stabilizer for fabrics.  

Irina

Irina

 

Digitizing, Stitch types

Stitch Types & Limitations When your learning to digitize it is very important that you understand what the different stitch types and when they should be used. Depending on your level it will depend on what tools you have. Stitch Types There are three main categories of stitches in your embroidery digitizing software these stitch types can take form in many different ways. The three stitch types includes the run style stitch, satin style stitch and the fill style stitch. Lets take a closer look at them and when to use them. Run Stitches A run stitch should be used when you need a thin line, either as a traveling stitch, underlay or decorative stitch. These do not have any push or pull on the fabric, but they can sink into some fabrics and you may need to use a bean or two ply stitch to get a desired result. Stitch length should be between .03 to .15 Satin Stitch The satin stitch is the main style of stitches for most fonts, it works best in situations where the stitch is not uniform, and works best between .03 to .35 inches thick,depending on your machine you may be able to get up to .42 inch or .51 inch but it will often be loopy. Fill Stitch The fill stitch come in many shapes and patterns but it can be used to fill any area where a satin doesn't work, great on areas .10 to infinite..However on large fills you may want to look at applique. You can use it in smaller applications but tends to distort at smaller sizes. Fills are great for blends. There are some other stitch type you will see in your embroidery digitizng software and they are all based from the three basic stitch types. Manual Tool This tool is very similar to the run tool except for a value for the stitch length you can place your stitches randomly as needed, however watch your stitch length. Steil Stitch This is very similar to a satin except its a zigzag and only one line , so the thickness is uniform. recommend for borders where its even and works best between .03 to .20 This tool is based on the run tool it a repetitive pattern. Programmed Fills These unique patterns are based on the run tool, they have 1 start point1 except point and they have to start and end in a repetitive pattern. Column Tool Is based on a Satin stitch where you draw the outline and it adds the stitches depending on the density. Enhanced Column Tool This is like the Column tool its based on the satin style of stitches butallows you to corner or bend the lines, where the column tools is for straight lines. Fill Tool This tool was based on the run style of embroidery stitches however its now its own stitch type , there are hundreds of patterns made by changing the stitch type and creative effects, including the carved style of stitches, similar tools may include cascade fill, cross stitch fill, The rules for these tools are not set in stone, you can manipulate them to suit your needs in the advance blogs we will be covering blending, shadows, wave fills etc. These are all based on the basic tools. Embroidery Design Characteristic When a customer shows you a machine embroidery designs you first should be able to recognize what stitches you will need to use, you should also be able to see what is in the for ground and background. This is generically called pathing. Pathing is basically mapping the design, it allows you to hide some stitches and be able to reduce the amount of trims as the stitches are not trimming or jumping. A good digitizer is able to path a embroidery design prior to digitizing it. Any embroidery will tell that they can recognize a poorly digitized design as it causes their machine to clunk and has unnecessary trims, or too many trims which can cause simulated embroidery thread breaks, or worse. Next blog we will cover how to use the basic tools. Author: Frank Prokator

diver361

diver361

 

Embroidering on Carpet

In some areas of leisure you will find niche markets, I have found one being able to make custom carpets for custom cars and sport fishing boats. So if you live near the water this is something you may want to offer, or if you have any car clubs in your areas. First you need to make a sample and bring it to car shows etc, or display it at your local dealers. Hi have done mats like the like the item Below, this was actually done for a young kids room.. As it was not going to be exposed to elements I was able to use some applique in the embroidery design. I have made over 20 specialized customer carpet sets for sport boats , custom cars and some other client that like items on carpets. I am also trying to break into the yacht market and embroider on carpets and seat covers. This is a niche market and I don't normally have standard pricing as you have to run your embroidery machine a lot slower it will take you twice as long to sew the designs, you will also go through more needles as once your done the job the needle are basically garbage, I would also recommend cleaning your embroidery machine between jobs the carpets give a fine dust that will get into the bobbin area when sewing. I have a small compressor right by the machine for blowing of the parts and lubricating. Most of my sets of carpets for a car go $250 to $400 and only quote on carpets for the trunk, I did one custom van and I had 5 carpets to do and I charge the customer $1200 for the job. When embroidering on carpets, you should be aware that conventional hoops will not be able hoop a carpet & that your embroidery machines arms will not support the weight on its own. I would recommend if you have a table raise it up to support the carpet. I use large clamps metal clamps to clamp it to the bottom sides of the embroidery machine arms, I found if you clamp it to the top it will stress the needle too much. I also recommend the following tips for sewing on carpets. Use a 80/12 Titanium needle with a sharp point as regular needles will get dull from punching through the carpet backing. All designs must be digitized for carpets as there are special requirements for the embroidery designs . Slow your machine down to a minimum of 400 rpm If its a Plush carpet please use topping this will prevent the presser foot from catching the nap of the carpet and or pulling out a strand or fiber of the carpet. Shave the outer edge of the carpet to prevent the nap from folding over the designs makes it look cleaner I use a Peggy stitch eraser If you want to sew you will either need to have the embroidery design made for carpets, keep in mind that you may run into problems if the embroidery design is not made properly. I purchased a used Merro embroidery machine to make custom carpets to fit the application and allows you to purchase bulk carpet for the application, If you have to purchase carpets that are customer made for the vehicle you will have to get in contact with the vendor. Another options is to sew through the rubber backing however doing this requires a great deal of patients and often frustrate you more than not however it can be done, If you consider attempting this you will need to use 110 needle and 40 weight polyester thread and slow your machine down. In addition between carpets check for needle damage and clean the needles blow of the dust from the embroidery machine. You also will need a industrial sewing machine for this option. Remember anything is possible however there is a learning curve when venturing into new areas.

diver361

diver361

 

Crazy cats

I found these designs and did them for a friend who is a serious cat lover, 7 at the last count and actually has a ring in ginger.  I did these for gifts and she loves them and already is pdeciding which ones match her  babies. I didn;t have time to iron them before I took photos.  When I ironed them they looked awesome.   Thanks for the designs.  

kje410

kje410

 

Creating a lace edging

Original text by: Lena Craftwork Sometimes you need to add a nice edging to an item. There are many ways to do it, and we will see one of them here: creating a lace edging. You can decorate a napkin, a handkerchief or any other item with lace. There are numerous FSL machine embroidery designs; choose the one that suits you and matches your item. Materials: Water soluble stabilizer Spray adhesive Upper thread Underthread Fabric for your napkin The process of creating a lace edging goes like this: 1. Hoop the water soluble stabilizer. Load your design into your embroidery machine. Begin embroidering. The first stitch will mark the position of the edge of fabric on stabilizer. 2. Add a layer of spray adhesive to your stabilizer. Stick your fabric to the stabilizer according to the outline and repeat the embroidery using the first thread color. This will secure the fabric in place. Then continue your embroidery and do the lace part. If you created your design using special software, the embroidery will go along the fabric edge and also at the corner. To decorate other parts of the napkin repeat the same thing joining the lace parts together. Hoop water soluble stabilizer and embroider using your first thread color. Place the second corner of your napkin onto the stabilizer, and secure it there. 3. Repeat the embroidery along all the remaining edges. 4. Cut the stabilizer near the edge of your embroidery. After the work is completed, wash your napkin with a lace trim in a sufficient amount of warm water. The napkin is ready. You can decorate a tablecloth or a handkerchief in this way, too.

Irina

Irina

 

Machine embroidery stabilizers: Hooping Filmoplast

Master-class by: Irina Lisitsa Beginner owners of embroidery machines are at a loss when overlooking the vast majority of stabilizers. This series of master-classes will teach you the basic rules of hooping of various types of stabilizers. After having read this you will be able to hoop an adhesive stabilizer (Filmoplast) in the right way. This type of stabilizer allows you to secure fabric with a layer of adhesive. Works good for fabrics of high and medium density, and also fabrics that cannot be hooped, like leather, chamois and coated materials.  How to hoop Filmoplast We will need:  Hoop  Filmoplast stabilizer  Marker  Scissors  Ruler  Put the stabilizer with its paper layer facing up. Mark the borders of the hoop.  Cut a piece of stabilizer, using the marking on the paper layer.  Put it on the outer ring with the paper layer facing up.  Put the inner ring onto the stabilizer and press it down.  Pull the edges of the stabilizer to smooth it out. Screw your hoop tightly.  Put the plastic template on the hoop and mark the borders of embroidery area with a marker.  Outline the borders of embroidery area with a marker or use the markings on the stabilizer.  With the sharp end of scissors cut the paper layer along the lines.  Take off the paper layer of stabilizer, to free the sticky side.  Stick your fabric onto it.  Embroider your design.  When the embroidery is completed, take the design off the stabilizer. 

Irina

Irina

 

Is Embroidery Digitizing An Art Or a Skill?

Embroidery Digitizing is a method to decorate the overall look of the design or material. The methodology starts when the art-piece is turned into a digital format and then the compatible software works on it to enhance the visibility and corporate image. After that, the design is read by the embroidery machine, turned into the graphic format and in the end; the machine embroiders the artwork efficiently. The techniques and methods take whole lot of efforts and expertise to get the job properly done. Now comes the question that in which category, does Embroidery Digitizing go to? Well, the simple answer is that it is a mix of both as only one characteristic between these two cannot be used to describe it. As technical as it looks, embroidery digitizing is basically an art as well. Embroidery Digitizing as Art: This embroidery method is all about understanding and learning about how the artwork is going to be designed and what should be the color combination. The look of “natural flair” is always taken as the priority because just like every art, beauty only shows when the product gives away natural flair. Along with that, the artistic touch and sense are also required when several things are decided, such as the patterns, vectorization and the decision of filling the blank spaces. The appropriate coordination of colors and shades is also important as well. Digitizing for embroidery is a kind of art procedure that definitely demands loads of things in terms of expertise of engineering, energy, motivation, material and performing the art in right direction. If it would be all about technical know-how, then it is not important at all to make so much effort to providing the best color schemes and making the designs look natural, which is the basic portion of embroidery digitizing. Embroidery Digitizing As Technical Skill: Along with being an art, it is a technical skill mainly because of the usage of the digitizing software, which is the most important part of the method. While making the use of the software, the optimum utilization of other tools is also of real importance so to ensure other factors, such as to make a correct number of stitches and not make them too dense etc. All of such considerations definitely need technological skills and understanding. There are times when the exact size and shape is needed, but not provided so the critical skill set is also required there to make sure that the design is made into the right size. So now you understand that embroidery digitizing is basically a combination of both art and technology that blend together to provide the high-quality embroidery experience to you & your clients. As stated above, it is both the art and the skill, so if you want any of your art piece embroidered and digitized, make sure that is gets done professionally by the service providers who are already the experts of this business. This work only looks good when it is done in excellence, which can only be achieved if the practitioners stay in business for quite a while.

Embroidery Bucket

Embroidery Bucket

 

Problem with My Editor installation

Question:  For some reason this will not completely install and I've tried several times. I'm using windows 10 with 4 core processor and 8 GB of ram and over 400 GB of free space. I have No issues downloading other programs so it must be some sort of problem with the program I believe. I hope someone else can confirm this. Support answer:  Please try the following: 1. Clean up all temp folders. In an explorer’s address bar type %temp% press enter. Delete all files that are allowed to be deleted. 2. Go to C:\windows\temp Delete all files. 3. Disable you antivirus software and try to make a new installation.

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Digitizing tools part 1


Introduction   When learning to digitize you need a good understanding of some of the basic tools including the select tool, understanding the beads and how to use them. Will help you when working with text to match a embroidery design. Text Tool bar and Digitizing When digitizing embroidery designs its very important to understand the different text tools and how to manipulate them , in this blog we will look at the tools, and options for kerning individual letters , this is required for matching your customer designs. Each of the above tools have a different use, Text Tool : This tool is great for text in multiple lines, text on straight or curved lines, and name stacking Vertical Tool : This tools is used for making stair case letters up or down. Arc Tool : This tool allows you to put text in an arc formation Circle Tool : This tool allows you to put text in and complete circle Monogram tool: Used for monograms only Line angle tool : Used for making straight line text. Work space setup You will need to familiarize your self with your work space to take advantage of some tools for embroidery digitizing. There are some buttons you should have features turned on.. The beads in version allow you to see the kerning points how you move them varies depending on how you set up your software. Here is how to check if your Beads are turned on they should be depress or yellow. Kerning Review When learning to digitize you need to know how to space and manipulate the text on the base line or within vertical or horizontal positions. This section we will review some terms and tools you will need to understand how to use them, The videos will also demonstrate using these tools. Kerning Definition Kerning is the process of adjusting the spacing between characters in a proportional font, usually to achieve a visually pleasing result. Kerning adjusts the space between individual letter forms, while tracking(letter-spacing) adjusts spacing uniformly over a range of characters. Horizontal Kerning Beads Using the horizontal Kerning bead allows you to slide the text left or right, You need to have your beads turned on for these to show up, See image below of this bead and example of it being moved, to make it easier to see Tajima Pulse has change the outline to PINK when moving or adjusting the kerning. Vertical Kerning Beads Using the vertical kerning beads give you a few more options, when you click on this bead a pink box will circle the letter with nodes on the corner and arm at the top with a circle. This is very similar to using the power edit feature in some levels of the software.   Skew or Slanting Letters To the right by grabbing the top right most node you can skew a letter left or right. This will enable you to move in real time instead of guessing the slant or italicize the letter. This also know and skew, slant or italicize. The node should be pink in your software. Zoom in to make it easier to see.   Vertical Height Adjustments To the left we show you how to adjust the height of a letter using the kerning tools, if you grab the top node on the box click and drag it up this will make the letter taller, if you need to make it proportional you need to use another tool. The node should be pink in your software , zoom in to make it easier to see. Proportional Size To the right you should see which node to grab to adjust the letter in proportion this means equally tall and wide as the original.The node should be pink in your embroidery digitizing software , zoom in to make it easier to see. Horizontal Width Adjustments To the right you will see how to grab the node to make your letters wider, or stretched without adjusting the height. Grab the pink node on the right side of the letter and move it to the left to make the letter thinner, or to the right to make the letter fatter.   Vertical Kerning Adjustments To the left you will see how to grab the node to make your letters wider, or stretched without adjusting the height. Grab the small ring in the center of the letter this will allow you to move the letter lower or higher on the axis. Its great for working with script letters to get the letters to align. But it also can be used when making the first letter larger and re-positioning it on the line.   Rotate Kerning Tool To the right you will see how to grab the top node on the stick pointing up and rotate the letter, you can rotate the letters upside down if you need to mirror text or match an angle, I use this in 5% of designs for editing text. Next blog we will look at the advanced tools for text. when using them to digitize lettering

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diver361

 

Embroidery business: Finding a digitizer


Are you new to the industry do you out source your embroidery digitizing, How do you know which digitizers are good? Well this can be a challenge at the best of times, whether you learn to digitize or out source it you will still be a part of the equation. You need to provide them with the tools to make the machine embroidery design custom to your needs. You need to provide them with the size, number of colors, the fabric or application you plan to embroider it on and more. TIPS Scan the artwork in at 300 dpi finished size of the design number of colors the application whether its going on caps or flat the material type . Most digitizing companies will quote the job prior to digitizing it or explain their rates up front so their should be no surprises. The rate varies from $1 to $15 per 1000 stitches depending on the companies policies and abilities. In today's market its very competitive market so show around. Its also good to have a few good digitizing companies in your play book as some digitizers specialize in one or two methods,.. Some specialize in making embroidery patches, chenille, corporate logos, jacket backs and more. My specialty was motorcycles I like digitizing these embroidery designs. but some companies do photo realistic work. In the above artwork the design was for a jacket back for a zoom keeper of the tiger, he wanted a very good interpretation of what the tiger looked like, the only problem with this design is its costly, like $80-100 to have it digitized. The best way to find a good digitizing company is to check with your peers, or send out the same design to several embroidery digitizers to evaluate the ability to meet your criteria. I would choose a design that had several different elements in the design possibly including small lettering and several colors, you will be amazed that the results you get back. Now that you have found a few digitizers evaluate their ordering system, is it easy to order, is it down in a fair time. are they easy to understand. these are all factors in finding a digitizer that is suited for you. Another decent design for a jacket back from a 2nd company. This design is okay but not great so , but would be okay for a left chest. You need to know what to expect when you get something digitized , it also needs to sew out smoothly and be editable by you, some companies only supply the stitch format so any edits you need to go back to them for work to be done. You should find someone that uses your software and willing to provide it in an outline format like PXF for Tajima Pulse users, Most digitizing companies only provide the DST or stitch file.

diver361

diver361

 

Tips and Tricks: Techniques 3D Foam


In the embroidery industry whether you are new or be in the industry for a while. You will be asked to make some embroidery design that might make you wonder how to do that. 3D Puff embroidery design is one topic that I find I get asked about all the time. How do I make my designs stick off the hat .. Well its actually not that difficult, and you only need some basic tools, including the run tool, satin tool and possibly the fill tool. If you need to just make some text using Foam Pulse has a couple of fonts that are designed to be used with foam. Now if you want to punch or digitize your own embroidery design, as that font may not be suited all you need to do is use your RUN tool and your SATIN tool and manually cap all open ends on the machine embroidery designs. Lets take a look at a sample design I made for a friend this past week.   NINJA TURTLE EMBROIDERY DESIGN Lets take a quick look at the different layers on how it was made,   Layer 1 This first layer is very simple, just a base for the background where the text is going using a complex fill tool.   Layer 2 Custom lettering for the WHITE text for the designs as the font slants in different directions however a standard font could be used. Layer 3 Is the 3D Foam , So what you need to do is embroidery digitizing program a stop on your embroidery machine so it stops when it finishes the white layer, this allows you time to put the foam on. I recommend taping it in place. Zooming in on one of the cap ends. Layer 4 Black layer is the border stitch.. there is 2 reasons for doing this last, it will often hide aspects of the foam sticking out and or to make it pop. his might be a bit challenging but if you break it down and look at 1 section at a time its not that difficult. Below is a final sew out of the hat. I used a 39 THIRTY New Era Full Back cap for this.. Note when you offer 3D foam to your clients make sure you increase your price but 50% I charge $30 for a design like this, the stitch count was 21576 because of the high density to cover the foam   Author: Frank Profocator

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diver361

 

Tips n Trick, Introduction to Advance techniques


BORING TOOL   NOTE: This chapter will be covering some advanced options for Maestro users, however to the full benefit of this chapter you will the Boring tool, cording tool, for your machine. This tool can be used for decorative stitching, by placing holes in the garment and embroidering around them. You will need to check with your Distributor if your embroidery machine supports the hardware and get the option in your software, standard on Tajima Pulse Maestro optional on Tajima Illustrator Extreme. INTRODUCTION Depending on your line of work and digitizing path you may or may not need to learn this tool. Its designed for the decorative digitizer that either does fashion, home furnishing production pieces etc. If you find yourself doing corporate logos you will not need this option. However a lot of home embroiders, craft embroiders and fashion embroiders could use this feature to add some styles to their embroidery designs. BORING TOOLS The boring tool style presents a beautiful eyelet characteristics, boring lends itself to the home furnishing and fashion apparel decorating markets, specialty areas like ladies fashions you can incorporate this style of stitches for those embroidery designs. Its critical when using the boring tool to make sure your garment or raw material is tight in the hoop as the tool will tend to stretch the fabric or put pressure on the fabric. Magnetic clamps work great for this application. Tips on ideas for boring the general rule for boring decorative holes are small is better than large. The larger holes can distort the fabric and cause some alignment issues. generally 5 to 7 mm holes are a good size. Note when digitizing for the boring holes the needle sits 12mm in front of the knife blade for the holes so the design will need to be offset by 12 mm to line up the design. You also need at least 2mm spacing between holes. This tool takes quite a bit of practice to line up the embroidery design with the holes. See Artwork Design below. TAJIMA DGML by Pulse Option In your Tajima DGML by Pulse embroidery digitizing software you will have 3 boring tool options Triangle , Oval and a square. When working with these tools you will to make sure your density is between 70-90 spi to get the desired shape of the design,.saving stitches here will likely cause distortions. NOTE: the reason you need a lot of stitches for this application is the stitches pull back the fabric and hold it in place, the knife or boring tool doesn't remove the fabric but pierces it, the satin stitches pull the fabric back and tuck it in, thus the reason the embroidery stitch density must be strong enough to hide and cover the fabric edges. BORING TIPS - If sewing several holes together, sew manual underlay all at once for all the sections. If sewing other heavier designs elements near the bore hole, sew the boring holes first, this way the holes will not be covered by the other components. if doing an eclipse or oblong holes, sew the satin stitch at an angle to the holes edge rather than perpendicular to it, this will grab any extra threads and pull them in. Always use underlay so the fabric and its backing material won't shift and the cause the hole to close up. EXAMPLES The boring tool is a great attraction for those who also do sequins as you can get a lot of diversity using both these tools. Sequins are covered later in this chapter. CORDING TOOLS Most of you think of unique embroidery processes as being applique, puffy foam and tackle twill. Those are actually categorized as applications rather than processes. Processes typically involve a special attachment that enables a machine to produce a different type of embellishment. Unfortunately, very few shops make use of, or even know about, such options. One of those unique processes that has been around for quite a number of years is cording. This process is simply the attachment, through the stitching process, of a small cord or rope to the item being sewn. The selected cording material is stored on a spool and fed down to one of the machine needles which has been modified slightly. The needle doesn’t sew with the cord, but rather, uses embroidery thread to stitch the cord to the garment. Contact your dealer for options. Cording is a relatively simple process and easy to embroidery digitize for. Basically, you will just create running stitches in the areas where cording is to be applied, to sew the cord into place. However, keep in mind that the automatic trimmers do not trim the cord, only the thread being used to attach the cord. CORDING TOOLS So, the cording portions of a design must be continuous without jumps or trims, as the machine operator will have to stop and manually trim the cord with scissors. In addition, tight circles and curves should be avoided. Some designs can use heavy thread or even wire. In your embroidery digitizing software you can switch between standard embroidery to the Lock Stitch Chenille depending on your equipment and setup. For mixed mode machines its very simple just selecting a needle color for the machine. Cording Tool You can use the cording tool as a run stitch via the left design or program it with a zig zag stitch on the right side. On the machine side you can control the swing pattern , consult the manual of your embroidery machine. Cording Tool Examples of pattern 1 Tip ... You have to make sure that the stitches are not to sharp, the minimum stitch is 1.5 mm and the maximum stitch should only be 5 mm.. Each of the techniques can open up new markets, research them when buying new embroidery equipment.   Author: Frank Prokator

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diver361

 

Fur Stitch Technique


Fur Stitch In Tajima DGML by Pulse there is an option which also come standard to allow you to make a stitch called a fur stitch. However I like the manual way which is available in many other levels. I will illustrate both in this document. Why should you use a fur stitch ? Well a fur stitch can be used as a layer to add depth to a embroidery design, here are a few examples where the embroidery design has a fur stitch as the base layer or as an accent. Example 1   Example 2 So what are the two methods ? Well in Tajima DGML by Pulse if you have Maestro level you will have the option to make a stitch called a fur stitch. This tool has some presets built into it . and here is what the tool stitch looks like. Here is what the satin tool option looks like both are very similar. Lower density is often associated with the fur stitch as its their to add texture.. When your using this technique your going to want to add a few layers of top stitches. Here are the next several layers.   These layers are made up of similar color palettes to allow blending on the colors using various patterns, densities and stitch types will allow you to make detailed designs. In this case the embroidery design used the fur stitch technique for all these layers, but at a lower density of 28 spi. In the above layers they used run stitches, and regular satin stitches to add the detail. After you pull all the data together you get one awesome machine embroidery design.   Author: Frank Prokator

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diver361

 

Specialty embroidery threads and Applications

Specialty Threads In the embroidery industry we often encounter issues with specialty embroidery threads, and or applications these sometimes require special threads, backing, and needles. Metallic Threads When working with Metallic threads you will notice that they have fibers wrapped around a core, which may be nylon, polyester, or rayon. This can cause issues when using standard needles and you may need to look at the following tips. below. 1. Use needle with a large eye 2. Use if possible a 80/12 needle 3. Loosen your tension for that needle 4. Slow your machine down 5. Reduce your bobbin tension 6. Designs should be made for metallic threads 7. Metallic thread works best as an accent thread color FIRE RETARDED THREAD We use fire retardant Nomex™ and Kevlar™ for sewing designs and attaching patches to clothing and gear used by first responders, race car drivers, and others who need protection from fire and heat. This embroidery thread does not melt and can withstand temperatures of 700єF (366єC) before it decomposes. It has a flat, cotton-like finish. Both Nomex and Kevlar give the same protection. Please note you should use a backing that will work for this application too WATER PROOF EMBROIDERY It is now possible to embroider on waterproof or water-repellent fabrics without compromising their waterproof properties. Just apply THERMOSEAL to the back of your embroidery and water and moisture will not penetrate the fabric through the tiny embroidery needle punctures. Rain gear, outdoor jackets, functional clothing can be embroidered and everybody stays dry-use on work clothes e.g. for road construction, gardening and for all outdoor jobs. You will need a heat press for this backing. Gulnold Thermoseal seals all holes caused by the needle.. PERFORMANCE BACKING ActionBack is an exciting new cut-way product that is exclusive to Gunold. It is highly effective backing for stabilizing stretchy, slippery garments like today's popular performance wear. Stable in both directions, ActionBack will prevent drifting outlines, puckering and pooching.This takes the worry about jobs that sag or pucker even though the design works fine on other fabrics. I still recommend a small needle , the smallest hoop the design fits into and do not stretch the fabric. Soft and Sheer Fabrics Gunold's cut-away Soft n' Sheer embroidery stabilizer is a textured, non-woven, spun-bonded nylon embroidery backing that it is most popularly used as a knitwear backing. Soft 'n Sheer embroidery backing is multipurpose and is available in both black and white. This style of backing is great for active wear on dance uniforms, where conventional backing or stitches can irritate the skin. it has a soft feal and offers great support for the embroidery designs. GLOW N THE DARK THREADS Who doesn't love things that glow in the dark? Gunold offers two glow-in-the-dark embroidery thread options. You'll find "Glowy" luminous embroidery thread and "Fluor" fluorescent embroidery thread both have the same high quality as all our products. Both are designed specifically for multi-head embroidery machines. Fluor is a white thread, while Glowly comes in seven different embroidery thread colors. While both threads can be used as a fun and decorative touch for a wide-range of applications, such as Halloween costumes and stage costuming, they also have a practical, durable application. There are always new products coming out that can make your designs stand out , there are now new threads coming out that change color in sunlight, glow in the dark colors, transparent threads and much more, If you can image it , likely someone has it . NO SHOW BACKING Another product that is great to have in your shop, is no show backing, this backing makes designs appear like they are floating on the shirt, it works well on light color shirts where you need a cutaway backing but you don't want to see the backing through the shirt,often you will see a square or shadow on the shirt on light fabrics. BLACK BACKING Another tip black backing works great on dark colors as it not as obvious as white, its great thing to have in your shop works well on sweaters, t-shirts and jackets when their is no pocket and you do not want to see the white backing on the inside. Black backing cost a bit more but customers would appreciate the effort. Author:: Frank Prokator

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diver361

 

Tips n Tricks Adding a new thread chart

  Making Custom Thread Charts In Tajima DG/ML by Pulse there is a number of pre-installed thread charts however there are times where you need to create a custom chart with different thread thickness and or colors Thread Charts and Thread Palettes Embroidery Thread charts are a collection of embroidery thread and color information. Tajima DG/ML by Pulse has thread charts installed that contain information on threads from many thread manufacturers. Threads from a selected thread chart are displayed in the lower right hand side of the Tajima DG/ML by Pulse workspace. Clicking the plus (+) sign at the edge of the thread chart list will allow you to change the selected thread chart for the current design. Creating a New Thread Chart The Thread Table Editor allows you to create and edit thread charts. 1. Open a new document2. Goto Tools , click on Manage and choose thread charts,. Click NEW This will open a new tab , so you can add different threads. Once your screen opens you can now start to add new threads to your chart. Please note you will need to know what thickness the embroidery thread is , they type of thread, have the color codes, and Manufacturer info. Normally available on the color thread chart 4,. To add a new thread color click EDIT and click NEW THREAD 5,. Fill in the fields on the screen.   Name ­- The name of the new thread color (such as Royal Blue or Snow White) Manufacturer- The name of the manufacturer of the thread chart that contains this embroidery thread. Code - The manufactures code number for the thread. This is a unique code that manufacturers use to identify the thread. A embroidery thread code is usually used to identify a thread when placing an order with the manufacturer. Thickness - The thickness setting is a number used to define the thickness of the thread. 1. 20 wt thread very large thread 2. 30 wt thread 3. 40 wt thread default 4. 50 wt thread 5. 60 wt thread Very small Type - The type setting is used to describe the type of material used to make the thread. Examples are Cotton, Rayon, Metallic, Nylon and Polyester. Color - There are three different values used to define the color of the thread that is displayed. These values represent the amount of red, green and blue color that make up the color of the embroidery thread. These values, called RGB, are standard values for representing colors for computers. Clicking the Choose button will allow you to select from a list of basic colors or allow you to create a custom color. Once a color is selected, the RGB values for the selected color will be displayed in the color values. Repeat step 4 until all the colors have been added. Saving your Thread Chart When you have added all your threads now you need to save the file . 5. Goto File, choose SAVE AS , add your file name and it will add it to your charts folder. Now prior to accessing the chart you will need to close your Pulse Program and reopen it .   Author: Frank Prokator

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diver361

 

Tajima Pulse experience: Organizing design Part 1

Machine embroidery design management When you enter into the embroidery business you will soon learn individual ways to track and organize your embroidery designs, some people use a specialty program, a filing systems on your computer, a database and other. Today we are going to take a look at organizing your designs with Librarian. This tool has been around for a while, while it has some limitations its a great tool for searching for designs. What is Librarian Librarian is a single user database that has been built into Tajima DGML by Pulse since version 11, the main structure of the database has not changed much over the years. This database allows you to store your PXF or a wide range of other stitch files. This database allows you to enter in information about the embroidery designs from vendor, special notes, it also keeps track of size, colors and more. You can search by a wide range of topics and or view the designs by image. It depends on how much type you want to spend setting it up. Where is librarian , it can be found at the top of your screen and is available on a wide range of levels.. This tool is one of the most ignored tools in your software, when I worked with Tajima Pulse most customers did not know that it existed or what it could do for them, not to mention that it also comes with the option of a 1000 machine embroidery designs to start up with. While the designs are free its up to you to add them if you want them. When opening your software for the first time and you open librarian it will prompt you to choose a BLANK Database or PREMIUM Database, If you choose blank it will not show you any designs until you add them , if you choose premium database it will give you 1000 machine embroidery designs. Menu Options If you click on the Librarian tab at the top of your screen you will get a menu similar to the one I have illustrated below. Open Design This allows you to visually view the embroidery designs in your database. Search This allows you to search by various fields if entered Save Design Manual way to add machine embroidery designs from your workspace to librarian Save Design as Same as above but allows you to make a different version of another design. Groups You can store embroidery designs in groups to catalog the embroidery designs easier Favorites Allows you to set embroidery designs up as favorites for quick reference Database info Path to the database for backing up and seeing how large your database is Import A option for mass loading your designs, however it doesn't enter any additional data Rebuild icons Sometimes the database will loose some image files, this option rebuilds the image files. Multiusers This is only available to users that purchased the items. Setting Librarian UP Prior to setting up your librarian for the first time you will need to make sure you have permission to allow your system to right to restricted areas of your computer. Librarian needs permission from your windows to access this area. Contact your local distributor for help with this if needed. Opening Designs When you click on the Open option in Librarian menu you will get the following screen . This screen is a bit confusing for some while it may seem like you can choose the various options, you need to setup your librarian to use these features, the easiest method for this window is leaving everything as default and clicking open., There one option you may want to look at the datatype, this will also depending on what file types you have in your database. The types included all embroidery files, stitch designs like DST, PSF and home embroidery formats, Outline files like PXF, POF, chenille embroidery designs and outline chenille designs. Stitch Files Stitch files do not retain the color information in embroidery designs, and have limitation on sizing and editing Outline Files These are the best files to save to librarian as they save all the editing information, and color info of designs, just like saving them to your system Chenille files are only available if you have a chenille embroidery machine. When you click open it will show your digitized embroidery designs in your window, depending on how large your window is will depend on how many designs it shows, also dependent on how many designs you have in the database as well. Opening a embroidery design To open a machine embroidery design you can just double click it and it will open up in Tajima DGML or you can right click to get more options, The main option you likely to use is the properties tab, but you can play around with the other options as well. GENERAL TAB This tab will tell you basic info about the design, including when it was made, name of the file, Design TAB This tab will show you information about the design including, Designer ID, Customer, Design dimension, stitch count, number of colors, number of trims etc. User Tags Optional, I have used these tabs to hold customer information, you can also add notes or special instructions to the file as well Color Information This tab will show you the color information of PXF and PSF and POF files but not dst files Attachments Optional, I use this if I store a customer logo , I attach the original artwork to the database file Groups Optional, you can add (1) embroidery design to several different groups. Dog design can be added to a Dog group or an animal group. Mass Load This option is listed as Import , but its basically a option of loading multiple designs at one time. This is a very taxing process for the computer as it has to generate alot of information for your files, You should do this when you do not need the machine for any other embroidery digitizing software task. To use this option click the file types you want to add, choose the location where the embroidery designs are and click next and it will begin uploading you may also get a note that your embroidery program is not responding, ignore this and come back later. When its done your screen will go back to the original window, Now you can go back into Librarian and see the machine embroidery designs you have added, Now if you the import option you will need to add other details to each file if you want to know the vendor etc. Searching Embroidery Designs If you mass load , you will not be able to search all the fields, unless you edit each file. when you search for a machine embroidery design you can search by the following criteria General Tab Design ID Optional , this needs to be manually added Customer Optional , this needs to be manually added Description Optional , this needs to be manually added General Key Optional, but rarely used Status Default is Production Designs Tab Designer ID Optional , needs to be added Customer Optional , needs to be added Desing Dimensions Size of the design Atributes Stitch Count, colors, trims, jobs etc,. There are some other tabs but blank by default If you want the information to be all added its best to add designs as you use them , or several a day in your free time.

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Cap stitching upholl

Hi all!  Hoping for help. I’m doing a cap. Six letters offset to the left side on the cap. The beginning of the word is 1/8” lower than the last letter. It’s sewing uphill. How do I get the last letter flush with the first?

LPT

LPT

 

Embroidery on knitwear with the help of organza

Original text by: Irina Lisitsa Embroidery on knitwear requires the use of supplementary machine embroidery materials. You have to embroider a knitwear jacket ASAP, but all the specific stabilizers have run out? You may replace them with a piece of cloth that does not stretch, thin organza for example. This method is good for designs with loose fillings or made with columns, because organza will preserve the structure and prevent the stitches sinking into the fabric. Embroidery on knitwear. Materials: Embroidery threads Machine embroidery design The top stabilizer, a water soluble film Your item A piece of organza, big enough for hooping Embroidery on knitwear. A step by step guide: Hoop a piece of organza, like you hoop embroidery stabilizers. Spray it with adhesive, then mark the center of your design on an item or fabric. Stick your item on your organza piece. Add a piece of thin water soluble film on the top so that the embroidery on uneven-surfaced knitwear would come out neat, and the stitches wouldn't sink into the fabric. Set you hoops in your machine. Run the basting stitch first: this will join all the layers together and will hold the fabric in place while embroidering. Run the embroidery. After the embroidery is completed, remove the basting. Tear the water soluble film from the right side of the item and carefully remove the organza pieces between the embroidered objects. The work is done. Your embroidery on knitwear has been completed successfully!

Irina

Irina

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