Jump to content

Beautiful design, Morning owl look amazing.

This embroidery work up perfectly and stitch out nicely. 
Buy Now

Excellent stitches and original style

Stitched out beautifully! Looked amazing and no issues!
Buy Now

Loving birds.. Wonderful designs, stitched out beautifully

Really cute, You love this when you stitched it. Would love more of same designs.
Buy Now

Our designs looks great

Stitched out beautifully! Wonderful decoration!
Buy Now

Adorable design. Stitches out beautifully.

"Thanks so much for this design It's lovely and stitched out beautifully on leather."
Buy Now
  • entries
    116
  • comments
    59
  • views
    102,776

Contributors to this blog

About this blog

News about machine embroidery software and digitizing.

Entries in this blog

 

How to align machine embroidery designs with lace

Original text by: Katya Ebber Your hoop is not one-size-fits-all. You become acutely aware of it when you need to embroider lace ribbons or edgings. This master-class will tell you how to align machine embroidery designs with lace so that the joining places could not be seen. This master-class shows working in the embroidery design software (creation of the alignment crosses), and also the embroidery process.  Preparing the design in Embird  Load a chosen machine embroidery design into Embird. Add the alignment stitches and half stitches at the top and the bottom of the design. Copy and flip them vertically. Having added the alignments stitches, change the order of steps in the embroidery, dragging the objects in the objects bar, and also change their color. The main objects should be located between the top and the bottom alignment stitches. Click 'Paste' in the toolbar. In the pop-up list choose 'Basting' and define the stitch length. After you click 'OK' the guide stitch will be added to specify the design's position in the hoop. How to align machine embroidery designs properly  Load the prepared design into your embroidery machine and embroider the first color, according to the chart you added in the software. Hoop the water soluble stabilizer and embroider the first design (001).  Alignment stitches are embroidered with the last color of the design. They will be used as marks for linking this part of the design with the next.  Having embroidered the first design, trim away the water soluble stabilizer near the embroidery.  Hoop water soluble stabilizer again and embroider first two colors of the design (the guide stitch and the alignment crosses). Remove the hoop from the machine and add a thin layer of spray adhesive. Using a short pin, join the center marks of the alignment crosses on the embroidery parts and on the water soluble stabilizer.  Do the alignment stitches without the thread to check if the hooping went right. If all the crosses and stitches match, begin the embroidery. If the alignment crosses do not match, repeat the alignment process as mentioned above. This method is good for many items where you need to embroider a repetitive pattern. We have embroidered lace today, but if you need to do the edging of the table cloth or curtain, this method will work just as good. Use tearaway non-adhesive stabilizer for fabrics.  

Irina

Irina

 

Placement guide

General Information for placement When using the charts included in this document, the measurements are based on the following places to measure. (A) is the distance from the shoulder seem wear it meets the collar, down to the middle of the design.( is over from the center of the garment, if it has a zipper or buttons it should be measured from their. All measurements are in imperial system ( inches ) Recommended standard designs for a left chest should be around 2.25 inches high by 4.5 inches wide. Shirts with Pockets When working on garments that have pockets you may want to ignore the normal way of measuring as the design may not look appropriate. I center the embroidery design above the pocket usually about .5 inch and limit the design to a maximum of 2 high if not it will look to high on the shirt. Center it with the button hole on the shirt. When referring to the documentation its noted on the gender as this will impact the placement, typically its 5-7” (women) 6-9” (men) and 4-5” from the center.   ( A ) DOWN ( B ) ACROSS Men S 6” 4” Men M 6” 4” Men L 6 1/2” 4 1/2” Men XL 7” 5” MenXXL 7” 5” Ladies S 5” 4” Ladies M 5” 4” Ladies L 5 1/2” 4 1/2” Ladies XL 6” 5” Ladies XXL 6” 5” Crew Cut Sweaters or T-Shirts There is two places to sew embroidery designs on sweaters or T-Shirts, left chest or center of the chest.   ( A ) DOWN ( B ) ACROSS Men S 6” 4” Men M 6” 4” Men L 6 1/2” 4 1/2” Men XL 7” 5” Men XXL 7” 5” Ladies S 5” 4” Ladies M 5” 4” Ladies L 5 1/2” 4 1/2” Ladies XL 6” 5” Ladies XXL 6” 5” Center The center of the embroidery design should be parallel to where the bottom of the sleeves on tight fitted sleeves, on larger or loose sleeves the embroidery design should be 2” above the bottom of the sleeve. Hoodies When placing a design on the back , remember to adjust the designs location so the hood doesn't hide it. but on the front you can measure.   ( A ) DOWN ( B ) ACROSS Men S 6” 4” Men M 6” 4” Men L 6 1/2” 4 1/2” Men XL 7” 5” Men XXL 7” 5” Ladies S 5” 4” Ladies M 5” 4” Ladies L 5 1/2” 4 1/2” Ladies XL 6” 5” Ladies XXL 6” 5” Center The center of the embroidery design should be parallel to where the bottom of the sleeves on tight fitted sleeves, on larger or loose sleeves the design should be 2” above the bottom of the sleeve. Jackets When placing design on jackets take time to look for garments that have the embroidery pocket , it allows for most machine embroidery designs to be embroidered on left or right side. Looks professional when completed, and less chance of the hoop popping off and or hitting a zipper.   ( A ) DOWN ( B ) ACROSS Men S 6” 4” Men M 6” 4” Men L 6 1/2” 4 1/2” Men XL 7” 5” Men XXL 7” 5” Ladies S 5” 4” Ladies M 5” 4” Ladies L 5 1/2” 4 1/2” Ladies XL 6” 5” Ladies XXL 6” 5”   General rule for jacket backs When working on jackets you will need to also know where to place some larger embroidery designs on the back. This will depend on a few variables. Partial back 6 x 10” design 4” down Full back 10 x 10” design 3” down Caps When working with caps you should make sure that the design has been made to stitch from the center out, designs that haven't been digitized for this will often push off of center. Except when you get customer that want them off center. Depending on the type and size of your cap frame will depend on how large your designs can be, it also will depend on the cap your using. Average embroidery designs are 2.5" H and 4.5" W When embroidering logo on the back try to curve them to match the back curve of the cap, use a regular hoop for hooping. The Design should be 1.5" H x 3." W they can be large if the cap supports them. Special Materials When working on any special materials there is no set rules on where you can place it, however you have to be able to hoop it, I often sew on the front side of a hoodies 1 inch in, I use the Hoop tech clamping system which allows me to clamp very hard to hoop items including some of the following bags, towels and carpets straps and many other items. When sewing on bags you will need another method for clamping them. Here are some locations where you might sew some embroidery designs. Typically I make the design , 3.5” W x 4” H but it can be longer if the embroidery logo fits..but try to center it to the best of your ability. If you would like to use the software to see if the design will fit , you have the option of viewing hoops in your embroidery digitizing software. In here you can pick the different styles of hoops.

diver361

diver361

 

Splitting a machine embroidery design for future alignment

Original text by: Lisa Prass The problem of splitting a design emerges when a beginner understands that his (her) embroidery machine does not recognize the design only because it exceeds maximum size and does not fit the largest hoop that comes with the machine. Or, it fits the giga hoop, but the machine still fails to recognize it. If you have encountered such a problem, this article is for you. Splitting a machine embroidery design First, I want to mention that here we'll discuss only the machine embroidery designs saved in a stitch format. The ones that you have downloaded from our site or got other sources. It is the format your machine can recognize, and if it cannot, change the format into the one your machine can recognize and then continue reading this article. Got it? Splendid! So, you have a machine embroidery design in a format that can be recognized by your machine, and this design exceeds your maximum embroidery area. Maximum embroidery area Beginners are often surprised by the fact that even if they have a giga hoop and design that fits, their machine still fails to recognize it. The problem is that the machine has such a parameter as maximum embroidery area, and if the size of a design exceeds it, it does not matter whether you have a giga hoop or not. The size of the maximum embroidery area is determined by the manufacturer, and the machine cannot go beyond that. Therefore, if a design is bigger than specified, you will have to split it. Giga hoops are just a tool for embroidering designs beyond the maximum embroidery area. You can find out the size of your machine's maximum embroidery area in the manual. If all written above is clear, let's proceed... Splitting a machine embroidery design So, the size of your design goes beyond the specified limits, therefore, you have to split it and embroider stage by stage. This assumes that you have some embroidery software on your computer and also the experience of working in it. How the design will be split in many ways depends from the design itself. You should approach each case individually. I don't see a decision that could satisfy them all, and describing every single one of them seems futile to me. We'll better look into them in our next articles. I may just say this: you'll encounter problems while splitting a design only in the beginning. Having split 2 or 3 designs, you'll understand the whole process much better. You also learn all the nuances. When splitting a design and placing it in the hoop like the picture below shows us, you should bear in mind that the hoops must superimpose, otherwise there parts of the design won't match. Part of the design situated in the hoop must be a bit smaller than the hoop itself, so that in case of unsuccessful hooping you could move or turn it, to align with the previous part. Aligning a machine embroidery design Any case of splitting a design assumes the future alignment. A similar process goes between the two apparatuses on the satellite trajectory. But in that case the alignment is done by a special mechanism, whereas in machine embroidery the two parts of the same design are aligned with the help of alignment stitches, of which we will tell a bit later. There are two main ways of aligning parts of the same design: •    Alignment in giga hoop
•    Rehooping the fabric The difference between these two ways is only that in the first case you join two or three parts of the design with the help alignment stitches and without rehooping, whilst in the second case you align the parts of a split design with the help of alignment stitches, but still need to rehoop every time. About the alignment stitches There are different kinds of those. They can come in the shape of a border stitching or straight lines going across the embroidery area or special alignment crosses. Everything the embroider's imagination can produce. But regardless of their type, the alignment stitches are used only temporarily and are deleted after the completion of a design. The alignment stitches are added in the embroidery editor either automatically or manually by the user. How it is done depends on the software that is currently in use, its possibility to save the design for giga hoops, the alignment method and your own wishes. The alignment stitches must be present in both parts of the design. The embroidery process goes like this: 1. Do the first part of the design.
2. Embroider the alignment stitches.
3. Rehoop your fabric or change the position of your giga hoop.
4. Join the alignment stitches.
5. After the perfect match is achieved, you do the second part of the design.
6. Repeat the process the necessary number of times. In my opinion these are the main points on splitting a design and its future alignment when embroidering. In conclusion I want to bring to your notice a problem, which the owners of the old machines or the beginner level machines can encounter. Splitting a design by layers There can be situations when the machine does not recognize the design even if it does not exceed its maximum embroidery area. This usually happens with the designs that have many colors and large stitch count. The machine simply is not able to read such an amount of information from one file. Photostitch designs are notorious for that. Nowadays, with all the contemporary machines such occurrences have become quite rare, but if you use the equipment made at the dawn of the previous century you might encounter a problem. The design is split into 2 or 3 part to be embroidered one by one. You don't rehoop the fabric. The design is embroidered without moving. For example, a design has 25 flowers which will be embroidered one after the other, in this case the 1st file will contain first 15 flowers, and the 2nd one — the remaining 10.

Irina

Irina

 

Embroidery techiques: Openwork on knitwear (two-thread french terry)

Original text by: Irina Lisitsa To demonstrate the process of making an openwork embroidery I chose two-thread french terry, because this type of knitwear is stable, trimming distorts it very little, and therefore, is perfect for this machine embroidery technique. You can do this on any sewing or embroidery equipment. The making process is the same as with openwork and cutwork embroidery on any other fabric. This master-class will help the beginners to understand that embroidery on knitwear is not all that difficult.  Materials: •    Knitwear fabric (0.3 mm two-thread french terry)
•    Tearaway adhesive, either Stiffy 1860B or 1640B
•    Water soluble film 
•    Upper thread
•    Underthread
•    Machine embroidery design (download or buy one from our shop)  Openwork: The making process  Stick a tearaway adhesive of an appropriate density to the wrong side of your fabric. Hoop the stabilized fabric and turn in the screw.  Embroider the first color of your design (usually it is the stitch, which will outline the future design and mark the areas that will be cut out. Take the hoop off the machine and make small incisions in the center of an embroidered area, using scissors, a razor blade or a ripper, then cut away the bits of fabric with scissors.  Put a thin layer of a water soluble film on top of the fabric and secure it with pins.  Be careful not to put pins into the embroidery area.  Set you hoop into your machine and continue the embroidery.  After having embroidered the design, remove the stabilizer leftovers from both the right and wrong side of the item. Press the embroidery on the wrong side, on several layers of terry towel, so that the embroidery would preserve its density and not become flat.  Your openwork on knitwear is now ready! 

Irina

Irina

 

Embroidery Stabilizers: Do You Really Need Them All?

Original text by: Marina Belova I have once written a guide to all sorts of embroidery stabilizers (fusible interfacing materials) for manual embroidery. As we all know, the market is full of such auxiliary materials, which can be helpful to an embroiderer. Nevertheless, in these days I often think that not all of them are useful for me in my day-to-day work.  In the past I used to buy a lot of stabilizers of various brands, to see if they could be really helpful. I liked some of them and disliked the others; there were also certain products that I didn't know how and where to use even after having read the manual. In the course of time, after I gained some experience, it turned out that 3 or 4 types of stabilizer were sufficient for me to make a good embroidery. They really are enough for everything I embroider lately.  I'll show you what stabilizers I use for all routine projects and all types of fabric. I must specify though that the projects I do are rather simple: standard promotional designs on knitwear, terry cloth, occasionally caps, also ordinary materials like diagonal, coarse calico, two-thread cloth, sometimes the materials used in interior design, fore example silks and velvets of varying quality.  So, here's my basic embroidery stabilizer kit: 1.   Heavy-weight cutaway stabilizer (I wouldn't call it tearaway, like most of the sellers, because it doesn't tear that good), made in China. Density circa 60 g/m2. This stabilizer has a strongly pronounced fiber orientation, which isn't always good. Works fine for knitwear. Here it is: 2.   Medium weight cutaway stabilizer (some consider it tearaway) made in China or Turkey, density 35-40 g/m2. In my kit there is a cutaway stabilizer of 2 different brands, with and without fiber orientation (the last is my personal favorite). I use them for medium-level projects and ordinary textiles. Photo: an example of a stabilizer with single fiber orientation: And this is the one without any orientation: 3. A tearaway paper-like stabilizer, density circa 60 g/m2. It resembles recycled paper because it looks just as specked and non-uniform. I also have a punched-out variation of this paper, which also tears away easily. As it turned out, it comes in very handy when embroidering a design on terry cloth. But this paper-like stabilizer (and not only this one), as experience has shown, may be replaced by ordinary printing paper, which I sometimes do when it fits the size of design.  I rarely use other types of stabilizers, and usually as supplementary ones. 4. Thin water soluble film — a stabilizer topping for pile textiles, prevents the problem with pile piercing through the stitches. Nevertheless, I rarely use this film, too, but instead replace it with a stretch wrap or a plastic bag. I tested all the these materials in order to find a substitution for the expensive water soluble stabilizers, as I have already written. Water soluble stabilizers are used for lace and cutwork. There are also other types of auxiliary materials I use from time to time: Temporary spray adhesive Paper adhesive tape Double-sided adhesive tape And that's all there is to it. I don't keep a large variety of stabilizers. No spunbond, no heat away backing, no sticky backing paper-like filmoplast or other sticky embroidery stabilizers — I don't buy or use any of those. And even if I did buy some of them in the past, it was only for the purpose of examining them, because all these stabilizers can be replaced by their less expensive analogs. You can' have them all. Besides, if you embroidered on velvet using filmoplast as a stabilizer, it would turn out a real disaster, because filmoplast has a habit of taking the pile out, and it peels off easily, too. You have to be extremely careful with the projects that require a great number of stitches. Double-sided adhesive tape also tends to peel off the fabric.  Sometimes I think that everything new that pops up on the market is made with one goal in sight, and that is to induce customers to buy more and more materials. This happens because stabilizers become more and more differentiated, and not because they work better. It seems to me that the resulting embroidery is not always in connection with the price of a stabilizer and the innovations used in its making. What it depends upon is the quality of the design and the accuracy of hooping. Generally speaking, the resulting embroidery will be in strong connection with your experience in design making as well as handling different types of fabric and the embroidery machine.  Remember the general rule: the thinner the fabric, the thicker the stabilizer, however strange it might seem. You will get very soft lace using thermogaze, but it leaves residue which does not come off easily.  What stabilizers do you use in your work?

Irina

Irina

 

Embroidery Tips n Tricks , Cap Challenges

Avoiding pit falls of working with Caps When dealing with your customers you may need to educate them on what the placement and size of the logo for your particular machine is, as often the customer will want the designs to be too large for the cap frame. Some cap frames can accommodate a 270 degree rotation and some only do 180 degrees, the height will depend on the hat. Rule 1 , Placement The designs should be places 1/2 inch above the brim of the hat this allows the needle to clear the metal bracket that holds the hat to the frame. Rule 2 , Size The size of the embroidery designs for the front for most hats should be less than 4.5 inches wide and no more than 2.75 inches high. Some caps will allow for larger areas. Rule 3 , Backing Its very important to have precut sheets of tearaway backing, I recommend buying in a roll and should be med to heavy tearaway for caps. Rules 4 , Embroidery Design The embroidery designs should be made for caps, this will eliminate the push of sewing to the middle. All text should be design to sew from the center out, ( In Tajima Pulse their a tab called sew direction for setting this ) The embroidery design should be made specific for hats. Rule 5 , Speed of machine I recommend slowing your machine down to 600 spm when embroidering on hats, this will help reduce distortion,. Rule 6 , Needles When working with hats you may experience higher number of needle breaks as some caps, like the flexfit caps seem to have a hard ridge in the center of six panel hats, using an 80/12 needle will eliminate some needle breaks. Ridge on Six Panel Caps When working with six panel hats that are structured and feel thick in the center of the hat , there are several methods for making it easier to embroider on. Method 1 Water With a spray bottle wet the front of the cap where your embroidery design is going to be, this will make the material more pliable and easier to work with. Method 2 Heat With a hat press you can pre-press the area where you need to put the embroidery logo on this will soften up the areas specially on the seams. Alternate Placement Brims Often you will get request to place logos on other areas of the hat, and you may have seen designs embroidered onto the brim of the hat, this is only available on custom hat orders where they embroider the design on the material before adding the brim and sewing the hat. Alternate Placement Sides of hats This various methods for placing logos on the side of hats, however your limited to the hoop fitting on the side often the brim will get in the way of hoop large than 3.5 inches, so your designs should be no large than 3 inches wide. You can get around this by using specialty hoops, Alternate Placement Back of Hats This can be done with a standard 4 inch hoop and works with a wide range of styles, Often you will need to arc your text to match the contour of the back of the hat depending on the style. Check with your hat vendor many of them will have a custom hat program or pre made hats with logos embroidered on them . Usually a minimum order is required for custom hats to be made. I deal with AJM International or Headwear and they both have custom hat programs.

diver361

diver361

 

Creating a lace edging

Original text by: Lena Craftwork Sometimes you need to add a nice edging to an item. There are many ways to do it, and we will see one of them here: creating a lace edging. You can decorate a napkin, a handkerchief or any other item with lace. There are numerous FSL machine embroidery designs; choose the one that suits you and matches your item. Materials: Water soluble stabilizer Spray adhesive Upper thread Underthread Fabric for your napkin The process of creating a lace edging goes like this: 1. Hoop the water soluble stabilizer. Load your design into your embroidery machine. Begin embroidering. The first stitch will mark the position of the edge of fabric on stabilizer. 2. Add a layer of spray adhesive to your stabilizer. Stick your fabric to the stabilizer according to the outline and repeat the embroidery using the first thread color. This will secure the fabric in place. Then continue your embroidery and do the lace part. If you created your design using special software, the embroidery will go along the fabric edge and also at the corner. To decorate other parts of the napkin repeat the same thing joining the lace parts together. Hoop water soluble stabilizer and embroider using your first thread color. Place the second corner of your napkin onto the stabilizer, and secure it there. 3. Repeat the embroidery along all the remaining edges. 4. Cut the stabilizer near the edge of your embroidery. After the work is completed, wash your napkin with a lace trim in a sufficient amount of warm water. The napkin is ready. You can decorate a tablecloth or a handkerchief in this way, too.

Irina

Irina

 

Tips and Tricks: Techniques 3D Foam


In the embroidery industry whether you are new or be in the industry for a while. You will be asked to make some embroidery design that might make you wonder how to do that. 3D Puff embroidery design is one topic that I find I get asked about all the time. How do I make my designs stick off the hat .. Well its actually not that difficult, and you only need some basic tools, including the run tool, satin tool and possibly the fill tool. If you need to just make some text using Foam Pulse has a couple of fonts that are designed to be used with foam. Now if you want to punch or digitize your own embroidery design, as that font may not be suited all you need to do is use your RUN tool and your SATIN tool and manually cap all open ends on the machine embroidery designs. Lets take a look at a sample design I made for a friend this past week.   NINJA TURTLE EMBROIDERY DESIGN Lets take a quick look at the different layers on how it was made,   Layer 1 This first layer is very simple, just a base for the background where the text is going using a complex fill tool.   Layer 2 Custom lettering for the WHITE text for the designs as the font slants in different directions however a standard font could be used. Layer 3 Is the 3D Foam , So what you need to do is embroidery digitizing program a stop on your embroidery machine so it stops when it finishes the white layer, this allows you time to put the foam on. I recommend taping it in place. Zooming in on one of the cap ends. Layer 4 Black layer is the border stitch.. there is 2 reasons for doing this last, it will often hide aspects of the foam sticking out and or to make it pop. his might be a bit challenging but if you break it down and look at 1 section at a time its not that difficult. Below is a final sew out of the hat. I used a 39 THIRTY New Era Full Back cap for this.. Note when you offer 3D foam to your clients make sure you increase your price but 50% I charge $30 for a design like this, the stitch count was 21576 because of the high density to cover the foam   Author: Frank Profocator

diver361

diver361

 

PE-Design NEXT; fixing problem with "unexpected format"


This is most often a problem. When you try to open a file in PES format BROTHER PE-DESIGN NEXT you get message "unexpected format". .This problem is related to a large number of embroidery formats that are supported by the company and its Brother embroidery machines (currently 9). Or in error if you convert file in some converting software (Embird, Buzz Tools....etc). For fix this problem, you need using import DST, HUS, JEF, EXP, VIP, VP3, XXX, PEC formats. Procedure. 1 Open the PE-DESIGN NEXT embroidery editing software. In tab "Home" click Import Patterns. Choose "from File". 2. Choose disc and folder contained your embroidery design, which you want import.. Choose embroidery design. Click Import button. 3. Close Import dialog. 4. Click Home button . Click Save As and enter name and version (default 9) of PES format Note: Some patterns imported from embroidery cards cannot be exported. Divided embroidery designs and embroidery designs for the jumbo frame or multi-position hoop will be exported as a single file, and will not be split into sections.

diver361

diver361

 

Software for creating cross stitch patterns for the embroidery machines

If you are reading this article, it means that your interest for machine embroidery has overcome the beginner stage, and you have decided to master the embroidery software to choose the right one for creating cross stitch patterns. A lot of manufacturers, in order to increase embroidery editor capability, add a software module that allows creating cross stitch patterns and saving them into the formats recognized by the embroidery machines. What are these software products you'll learn from this article. I want to bring to your attention the fact that in this review I only point out those software products that allow creation of cross stitch patterns for embroidery and sewing and embroidery machines. Also note that you'll find only the widely known software products on this list, for I skipped the lesser known ones. Creation of the cross stitch patterns Creating cross stitch patterns for embroidery machines, on one hand, is the easiest of all digitizing tasks, but on the other hand, the most complex one. It depends on the principle of creation: whether a designer will work with ready patterns or create the new designs completely out of his head or using the images (such as photographs) of his own. Fortune favors a designer that has decided to try and digitize a ready pattern. There is no need to think about such design characteristics as basting, density and pull compensation. There is no need for using imagination to convert a photo into a cross stitch pattern. One just needs to figure out what types of cross stitch there are in hand embroidery, which ones can be created in the software, and after having mastered the tools, to create stitches one by one. A designer that wants to create cross stitch patterns from images or photos has to face all the problems with color scheme, stitch types and their size. This requires a creative approach and artistic thinking. To be through with the embroidery software once and for all, you need to understand that it comes in standalone editors and also built-in modules. I don't want to throw my weigh around and influence your decision, and yet I want to make some comments about the usefulness of various software products. The software for creation cross stitch patterns falls into two main categories: Standalone editors Of all the software meant for creation of cross stitch patterns and conversion of the files into the format recognized by embroidery machines we can single out two products: •    PatternMaker for CrossStitch
•    CrossStitch Professional Platinum Both of these software products were designed for creating hand embroidery cross stitch patterns, and only later the manufacturer added an option of saving the result in a format recognized by an embroidery machine. Although both of these editors were designed for creating hand embroidery cross stitch patterns and have practically all the tools for creating machine embroidery designs, in my opinion, CrossStitch Professional is slightly superior to PatternMaker. Notably, the latter of the two lacks an option of saving most of the special stitches (cross stitch) into a format recognized by a machine. Both software products work with scanned patterns as well as process images automatically and create designs with the help of the tools. Additional modules Nearly all big embroidery editors have additional modules that allows creating cross stitch designs. Sometimes they come as an in-built solution, sometimes you need to buy them separately. Embird (bought separately) has an automatic conversion tool, and also an option of fitting the scanned patterns into the open documents to make the process of creation more easy. You can also create cross stitch patterns with tools. Conversion of the special stitches is present. Wilcom ES – has an automatic conversion option, is able to create cross stitch designs from scanned pattern and has tools for object creation. There is also canvas changing option and the possibility to set the stitch count. The capabilities of the software are sufficient for creating cross stitch patterns, but one would wish more operational comfort. Bernina ES (in-built) — practically the same as Wilcom ES. Digitizer MBX/Pro (bought separately) — practically the same as Wilcom ES. They cost about $160-200 each. PE Design (in-bulit) – this software had an automatic conversion option, and you can also work with scanned patterns. Creation of the cross stitch patterns with the help of tools is not the best here. Compucon EOS — automatically converts images into cross stitch patterns and also has tools for creating objects with cross stitch fill. Tajima DGML by Pulse (in-built up to v. 14) — starting form the next version there is no automatic conversion tool. The software only has a tool for creating objects with motif fills and also one for creating cross stitch lines. Which software product to choose for creating cross stitch patters, is entirely up to you!

Irina

Irina

 

Embroidering on Carpet

In some areas of leisure you will find niche markets, I have found one being able to make custom carpets for custom cars and sport fishing boats. So if you live near the water this is something you may want to offer, or if you have any car clubs in your areas. First you need to make a sample and bring it to car shows etc, or display it at your local dealers. Hi have done mats like the like the item Below, this was actually done for a young kids room.. As it was not going to be exposed to elements I was able to use some applique in the embroidery design. I have made over 20 specialized customer carpet sets for sport boats , custom cars and some other client that like items on carpets. I am also trying to break into the yacht market and embroider on carpets and seat covers. This is a niche market and I don't normally have standard pricing as you have to run your embroidery machine a lot slower it will take you twice as long to sew the designs, you will also go through more needles as once your done the job the needle are basically garbage, I would also recommend cleaning your embroidery machine between jobs the carpets give a fine dust that will get into the bobbin area when sewing. I have a small compressor right by the machine for blowing of the parts and lubricating. Most of my sets of carpets for a car go $250 to $400 and only quote on carpets for the trunk, I did one custom van and I had 5 carpets to do and I charge the customer $1200 for the job. When embroidering on carpets, you should be aware that conventional hoops will not be able hoop a carpet & that your embroidery machines arms will not support the weight on its own. I would recommend if you have a table raise it up to support the carpet. I use large clamps metal clamps to clamp it to the bottom sides of the embroidery machine arms, I found if you clamp it to the top it will stress the needle too much. I also recommend the following tips for sewing on carpets. Use a 80/12 Titanium needle with a sharp point as regular needles will get dull from punching through the carpet backing. All designs must be digitized for carpets as there are special requirements for the embroidery designs . Slow your machine down to a minimum of 400 rpm If its a Plush carpet please use topping this will prevent the presser foot from catching the nap of the carpet and or pulling out a strand or fiber of the carpet. Shave the outer edge of the carpet to prevent the nap from folding over the designs makes it look cleaner I use a Peggy stitch eraser If you want to sew you will either need to have the embroidery design made for carpets, keep in mind that you may run into problems if the embroidery design is not made properly. I purchased a used Merro embroidery machine to make custom carpets to fit the application and allows you to purchase bulk carpet for the application, If you have to purchase carpets that are customer made for the vehicle you will have to get in contact with the vendor. Another options is to sew through the rubber backing however doing this requires a great deal of patients and often frustrate you more than not however it can be done, If you consider attempting this you will need to use 110 needle and 40 weight polyester thread and slow your machine down. In addition between carpets check for needle damage and clean the needles blow of the dust from the embroidery machine. You also will need a industrial sewing machine for this option. Remember anything is possible however there is a learning curve when venturing into new areas.

diver361

diver361

 

Tajima Pulse experience: Digitizing Small letters

Small Letter Introduction In this Blog we will discuss terminology, techniques and how to digitize small letters for best results. There is no one rule for all fabric when it comes to digitizing small letters as every fabric will sew out a little bit different and some experimentation will need to be observed. We have included some terminology to help you with terms and measurements. General Rules for small letters 1) Machine Settings: Approximate speed of 400 stitches per minute. 2) Needle Size: Use the smallest needle possible: 65/9 sharp 3) Thread: Use a lighter weight thread such as 50-wt cotton or 60-wt rayon. 4) Hoop: Use the smallest hoop that will fit the design properly. 5) Backing: Use extra backing. Add a heavy piece of tear or cutaway. 6) Spray Adhesive: Use spray adhesive on thin fabrics. Measurements In this document we will be using “mm” millimeters instead of inches as its easier to define the stitch length, and small measurements accurately. Here is a quick reference chart for you to use. 25.4 mm is approximately 1 inch
3/16 tall letter is approximately 4 mm tall
1/ 4 tall letter is approximately 6 mm tall
Tools Required To digitizing small embroidery lettering its recommended that you have and know how to use the following tools Run tool
Manual tool
Satin tool
Enhanced Column tool
Properties You should also be familiar with the properties windows and how to change the density and stitch length and pull compensation and be familiar with lock stitches and underlay. General Rules for digitizing small letters There are some general rules you should be aware of , but note they don't always apply but will the base line for making small lettering look good. Stitch length should not be less than 1 mm
For best results recommend using 65/9 needle and 60 weight threads
Use capital letters when all possible
Make sure the letters are connected , DON'T trim except in between words
Use manual underlay instead of automatic as it will push and pull too much
Don't use complex fonts when all possible the detail will not show up as much
Stitch Length When designing small text the golden fast rule is that you must maintain a minimum stitch length so your embroidery machine is able to sew the letters out, when you go below the minimum stitch length you may get undesirable results like holes or embroidery thread bunching up. In the figure below it shows where you should measure the art work to gauge your stitch length After measuring the capital E @ 10 mm high the stitch lengths should be greater than 1 mm in length a 1.9 mm, b 1.3 mm. c 1.5 mm, d 1.3 mm, e height of the letter is 10 mm When looking at minimum embroidery stitch length you will need to recognize that there are factors that can affect the out come even when the rules are followed. You will need to compensate for the push and pull compensation of the letters, and the underlay, and compensate for the material your sewing on. The rules indicate the minimum stitch length should be no more than 1 mm this is cause the embroidery machine cannot sew stitches beside one another that close. We recommend using a smaller needle 65/9 and a smaller thread for best results, 60 weight embroidery thread when all possible. On some materials you may need to increase the pull compensation so when the you sew 1 mm stitch it sews out at the 1 mm size without pull compensation it will sew out smaller and either bird nest or cause the embroidery machine to make a hole in the material. Note when sewing on Pique you may be able to get away with a stitch length of .8 mm but you must use a sharp needle Underlay When digitizing small letters do not use the underlay within the properties as it will cause undesirable results on your letters, automatic underlay cause to much pull and push on the letters and will cause the letters to look funny, keep the underlay to a minimum and manually ad it using a run stitch or manual stitch. You want to keep the underlay as basic as possible. When dealing with small lettering putting too much underlay will cause the stitches to push and pull too much to occur so you want to use just enough. On larger stitch length of 1.2 mm make sure there are no more than 2 passes, but when the stitches are 1 mm or less make sure the underlay only makes 1 pass or don't use underlay at all See above “e” Cornering Techniques When manually digitizing small letters you will want to pay special attention to the corners, unlike a regular text you don't want too many stitch around the corners or it will cause it to pucker and or put a hole in the embroidery design, you need to be delicate, we recommended using a mitered corner see below. Using the mitered corner will look a lot better do to the reduced stitch count and less overlapping of the stitches. Stitch Angel When digitizing small letters, you may run into situations where the embroidery stitches will be too long for the embroidery design of the letters, at these times you may want to change the angle of the stitches so you can make sure that the stitches are minimum 1 mm in length In the above illustration you can see that change the angle will allow for the stitch to meet the 1 mm length requirement. Some people will say that it will make the edge jagged but it not the case. Usually jagged edges are caused by not enough density or the underlay showing through. Special conditions When digitizing letters that have an opening in them like P D O B R you will need to alter the artwork or the stitches a bit so they don't join, there needs to be a gap as the stitch will sometime close up as they will expand to compensate see below. You will want to make 1 mm gap between 2 sides of the stitches Expansion When your digitizing small fonts with feet or tails your going to need to allow for expansion. Your going to want to make sure there is room for the expansion of the stitch as some stitch cause the material to push into one another. See Fig 1 An effect of the material pushing you will see the design sew out like Fig 2 Expansion can also cause the lettering to sew out crooked , when you manually digitize small letters you going to want to make the stitches all go the same way. Take a look at the path of the stitches

diver361

diver361

 

Underlay Types, digitizing tips

In this blog we will look at preparing the fabric for your designs, and understanding why you should use a particular type of underlay in building a foundation for the machine embroidery design. Underlay Types There are many names for the basic types of underlay in Pulse products you have several types, including Contour, Parallel , Perpendicular, Zig Zag, Lattice , Full Lattice and Center run. Contour Underlay When no underlay is applied, the embroidery thread making up the satin column lays flat on the fabric. This not only makes the embroidery look flat, but it allows the grain or nap of the fabric to peek through. Many new designers would increase density to block out the fabric peeking through, but it would be more effective to apply the proper underlay. Tip set the contour to .02 inches on the inset to make sure it doesn't stick out on corners. Never use by itself on a fill. Parallel Underlay My favorite for text , I use the parallel underlay on any column stitch or steil stitch when ever possible, I find it gives the columns a good foundation prior to the stitching, its like a zig zag stitch but not as dense. I use it on knits and many of the stretchy type materials, including golf shirts, t-shirts, sweats, and hats and knitted caps. Perpendicular Underlay The perpendicular underlay puts a column of lines down the center of the column and is often with each line just off center. I have used this with towels when I want to raise the text up a bit in addition to using zig zag. Advantages of this it will help push the column apart as the stitching goes in opposite direction of the satin stitch. Zig Zag Underlay Zig zag underlay provides additional loft than what can be achieved by Perpendicular or Contour. These two underlay types are especially effective at lifting the top stitches on fabrics such as pique, terry cloth and fleece. Due to their lofting characteristics, they are also used to give life to embroidery design aspects such as leaves or muscle tone to animals. Zigzag underlay is often used in addition to center run underlay where the center run is securing the fabric and the zigzag is creating the loft. This combination is the most under-used of the underlays, but when used at the appropriate time can set your design apart from others. Best used on satin stitches, Lattice Underlay It can best be described as a light density fill, normally running perpendicular to the top stitch. The fill underlay anchors the target fabric to the backing and is the best way to reduce the push and pull factor so common to fill embroidery areas. It also lifts the top stitches up and allows a much less dense fill to be applied. This is the best way to prevent your designs from suffering from "bullet proof" fill areas. First placing a Contour underlay and then a lattice underlay has proven to be the best combination for medium to large fill areas. Center Run ( New Version 14 only) In Tajima DLML version 14 there is a new underlay option called center run it places a stitch right in the center of the column. This is very useful on small text as it helps keep it conformed to the space provided, and doesn't usually cause to much bulk for theses small letters. Automatic Underlay Automatic underlay can be applied with a recipe or style when using the embroidery digitizing software or you can apply it by going to properties and adding the type of underlay you want. You can also adjust the inset, density, the stitch length and angle of the embroidery stitches, number of lines, drop stitch or angle of the underlay. It can be very useful. Manual Underlay I use manual underlay when working with fills that have steil borders and or when the garment has a lot of stretch too it. Typically Automatic underlay goes under each segment, however there are times when you want the underlay to go under both segments all at once. This will eliminate the two parts pull apart, the easiest way to make this is to use the complex fill tool draw a shape around all the segments and cover them completely, see comparison below; Above you will see both the manual and the automatic have both a lattice and a parallel underlay applied, the Automatic the two underlays do not overlap where as the manual you can place the underlay underneath the parallel which will prevent the two from separating. I use this method quite a bit when digitizing. Terminology for Underlay Settings Angle The angle of the underlay Connection End The type of end used , option include, Sharp, Square Chiseled and Zig Zag. You can change the connection end to adjust either the appearance or how the design sews out. Density The density of the underlay how thick the underlay stitches will be, normally around 10.5 spi Drop run stitch Is a setting to ensure the proper placement of the run stitches, setting include None, At Anchor, Chord gap. At Anchor Drops the run stitch and penetrates it at the anchor points - None forces the run to stitches to follow the stitch length
- Chord Gap places the stitches fit to the top portion of the curve smoothly by shortening stitches at the top of the curve
Inset The distance the underlay stitches are placed from the edge of the top stitching. Inset A The outside inset Inset B The inside inset Max Chord gap The Max Chord Gap is the maximum gap between two points on a bezier curve. Min Stitch length The minimum stitch is usually set to .02 normally you do not want to go under this however sometimes you want this stitch higher. Override Some setting in the underlay they use a particular pattern, there are times when this is not suited for the application Repeats This is a setting when you want the underlay to repeat Sometimes it better to go over the same spot Sequence The sewing order of which underlay goes down first sometimes you want a perpendicular to go down before doing a parallel stitch to give some extra support. Stitch Length The length of each stitch on the underlay, the shorter is ideal when working with smaller sizes, but does increase the stitch count Application Notes 3D Foam When applying underlay to use with foam you have to remember that you do not want to suppress the foam, if you feel the need to add underlay use a contour underlay with a short stitch length. Make sure the design is made for puff.. Leather With leather you do not want the underlay to punch a hole where the designs is going to go through this can cause the material to rip , With leather reduce the density of the underlay, and rotate the underlay to a 45 deg of the top stitch pattern. Small Lettering I recommend using either the center walk on small letters or punching the underlay manually, watch the stitch lengths, and use a smaller needle and thread. Large Lettering I using parallel or a lattice to compensate for the amount of stitches going down, recommend cutaway to support large letters in large hoops. General Recipes Fabric / Backing / Underlay / Compensation Notes Broadcloth / Cutaway / Parallel / Percent 110 Burlap / Cutaway / Perpendicular / Percent 110 Canvas / Cutaway / Perpendicular / Absolute .01" Chamois / Cutaway / Parallel / Percent 110 Chartreuse / Cutaway / Perpendicular / Percent 110 Chiffon / Water-soluble / Perpendicular / Percent 110 Cloth Diapers / Tearaway / Parallel / Percent 110 Corduroy / Cutaway / Perpendicular/zigzag / Percent 110 Denim / Cutaway / Parallel / Percent 110 F aux Fur / Cutaway / Perpendicular / Percent 110 Use 505 spray on backing F aux Suede / Cutaway / Perpendicular / Percent 110 Use 505 spray on backing F aux Leather / Cutaway / Perpendicular / Percent 110 Use 505 spray on backing Felt / Tearaway / Parallel / Percent 110 Flannel / Tearaway / Parallel / Absolute .01" Fleece / Cutaway; / Perpendicular/zigzag / Absolute .01" Jersey Knit / Cutaway / Perpendicular / Absolute .01" No stretch cutaway Leather / Cutaway / Perpendicular / Percent 110 Use 505 spray on backing Linen / Tearaway / Parallel / Percent 110 Micro Pique / Cutaway / Parallel / Absolute .01" No show backing Microfiber / Cutaway / Perpendicular / Absolute .01" Neoprene / Cutaway / Perpendicular / Percent 110 Use 505 spray on backing Nylon / Cutaway / Perpendicular / Percent 110 Organza / Water-soluble / Perpendicular / Percent 110 Pique / Cutaway / Perpendicular / Absolute .01" . Satin / Cutaway / Perpendicular/parallel / Absolute .01" no show backing Silk / Cutaway / Perpendicular/parallel / Absolute .01" no show backing Spandex / Cutaway / Perpendicular/parallel / Absolute .02" Sweater / Knits / Cutaway / Perpendicular/parallel / Absolute .02" Sweatshirts / Tearaway / Perpendicular/parallel / Absolute .02" Cutaway can be used T-Shirts / Cutaway / Perpendicular/parallel / Absolute .02" Towels / Tearaway / Perpendicular/zigzag / Absolute .01" Topping can be used Velor /Cutaway / Perpendicular/parallel / Absolute .01" Velvet / Tearaway / Perpendicular/parallel / Absolute .02" Wool / Cutaway / Perpendicular/parallel / Absolute .02" NOTES 1 On most machine embroidery designs you can get away with a 75/11 needle, however if you find yourself needing small detail and or small text invest in some small needles like 60/8 or 65/9 needle and some 60 weight thread this will allow your small designs or designs that have a lot of detail to be crisp without bulking up the design. Small fonts in your software have underlay built in, you will need to 2 sheets of cutaway to helps support the text. NOTES 2 If you plan on using the recipes in your software please note they are general notes, the design the type of backing, manufactures and shirt type can all impact the design. Its your job as an embroider to learn when you need to change the backing, and to troubleshoot your choices. NOTES 3 Make sure you use the smallest hoop that will fit the embroidery design. Author: Frank Prokator

diver361

diver361

 

Working with embroidery design files; Librarian. POF format. convert to outline


Introductions When learning to use your embroidery digitizing software and or digitizing you will need to know how to work with files and file types when re-sizing etc. Embroidery Files In newer versions for Tajima DGML you can open various types of file format list below ; PXF, POF, PED, KWK, PSF, PCH, EMD, DST, TBF, TCF, EMB, ART, PEC , PES, DSB, DAT SEW, JEF, CND, EXP, PCM, PCS, CSD, PUM, ARC, PAT, T15, XXX, HUS , SHV, VIP , VP3, DSZ. Tajima Pulse embroidery formats There are only three formats that you should be working with as your primary formats, POF (Pulse Outline Format) PXF (Pulse Unified Format) DST ( stitch file ) The other embroidery formats are secondary formats, and while you can open them your limited on editing them as they are stitch files. Tajima Pulse PXF format Not all file types contain the same amount of information and when you make your own files you should be saving them to your hard drive as PXF. This format is exclusively a Tajima Pulse format. This format allows you to access both the Outline and Stitch files associated with a embroidery design, at the same time. This embroidery format gives you the most control and you don't loose any thing. Stitch Files When working with stitch files you should be aware of certain attributes and rules that apply to this format. When resizing it doesn't adjust the density, or stitch count of the design, which will make for a poor sew out if resizing more than 10%. Files that are considered stitch files include. DST, EMB, PCH, PES, PSF, SEW, When working with any stitch file your best to convert it to an outline and then re size it as an outline and then save it back to a stitch file to sew it out Outline Files When working with outline files you can edit and re size and the number of stitches in the design will adjust with the changes. Outline files are extremely flexible and allow the user to easily make changes including the stitch patterns and control settings like underlay. Outline formats include POF, PED, KWK and CND. NOTE: When converting a stitch file to an out line it will give you greater control however it will not be the same as an a true outline file, I personally recommend that you save all your designs as a PXF and only output it to DST for the machine file. Advantages of PXF Files There are many advantages to working with PXF files as seen below; 1. Full editing control, re sizing , or manipulating 2. Remembers color sequence, underlay settings, 3. Flexibility, remembers the fonts used and density 4. Saves time, 5. Eliminates guess work Differences Between Stitch Files and Outline Files Converting files to an outline In Tajima DGML version 11 or newer when you open the file you can open the file as a stitch segment , or you can convert the stitch file to an outline format which will allow you to edit it. Steps on converting the files go to file open Select a stitch file At the bottom of the open window see Fig A Choose convert stitches to outline. Then open the file. Viewing Stitch Files vs Outline files Here is some visual ques of the difference between a stitch file and the outline file. You will notice the stitch file doesn't show any angle lines, or start stop commands that are showing up in the outline file . This means the stitch file is all one group and the outline is individual segments. Re-sizing Stitch Files vs Outline Files When you re size a stitch file see the difference compared to an outline file , the original file size for the design was 1364 stitches. After re sizing both files by 50% the stitch file went down to 1330 stitches and the outline file went down to 962 stitches. The stitch should not look so dense on the outline file.   Sequence view for both stitch files and outline files; Steps for converting a stitch file to outline file To convert a file when opening it follow steps below. 1. Go to File ... 2. Choose Open 3. Select the DST file 4. At the bottom of the open screen see Fig 1 5. Select Convert segments to Outline 6. Then open the file. Outline File Editing When editing an outline file make sure its a true outline file and not a stitch file converted to an outline. Editing a true outline file will make your life as a digitizer so much easier. It addition it take 85% off of labor to edit a PXF vs a DST file when changing the design. POF files and PXF file also save all the color information no more guess work. NOTE: Do yourself a favor an save all your work as a PXF file it will make your life much easier when editing a design. NOTE: If you do not do digitizing in house , when asking for files in PXF some digitizers will try to pull the wool over your eyes when sending you a PXF file it will be a stitch file saved as a PXF file, I see this all the time. I have a video on how to recognize the difference between a stitch file, a stitch file converted to an outline and a true outline like a POF or PXF Managing your files. I don't know about how many designs you have, but I know I have embroidery designs from several different digitizes, some stock embroidery designs from various vendors, and logos for my customers. It can be a daunting task to keep a handle on them. In years gone by we would store the design on floppies, I still keep the sew files on a floppy in a file folder with the sheet but I also keep the master copy on my computer, save in the PXF format. So if I need to edit I can very easily. I also have the ability to look up what font I used and what underlay is on the design. On my digitizing computer I use Librarian. I would recommend that every one take notes on how to use Librarian, as it will once you learn it save you time hunting for that design. This is one of the most lost functions of the software not used. Librarian Librarian is a database, much like a database that you store your contacts in or accounting information in. Databases allow you to access more information in a faster pace, allows you to catalog the designs and search by various strings. I think its the most neglected tools.If you are a larger shop you may want to invest in librarian server which allows you to store the designs on a server and access them on any system with DGML with the appropriate licenses. This option also allows you to pull designs down from librarian server to the embroidery machine when using the bar code option. NOTE The built in version of librarian when set up for the first time comes with 1000 stock designs for use in your embroidery designs. These design can be access by searches or by the categories. Librarian Menu You have the ability to browse by picture, name or list of the designs, or you can get very specific and search for the embroidery design you want. You can organize your customer into groups, save favorites or even have different databases. You have the ability to import or I call it Mass load embroidery designs , and depending on your level you can export the designs too. It can be a very powerful tool is its given the chance. File Open In the file Open window you have the ability to type in the name or data type and view the files in that type, for customer that have embroidery and chenille its a great way to organize your designs. If you just want to browse all you have to do it just click open and it will open all your designs in alphabetic order Librarian Librarian allows you in basic to view, search and store lots of information about the embroidery design. You can store color information of all outline files in addition it records the size and options.This single version is free in all the levels of the software. In addition their is no limit to the size of the database, the only limitation is that is a single version. Searching Searching tool this is where this program excels, you can search by name or part of a name, by customer, by description, production or stock design, or special fields like chenille. You can also use wild cards while searching designs. On the properties tab , you can search by size, creation date or last used, several different. When you go to the properties of any design that you have saved there it will have a lot of useful information available at your fingertips Information like , Designer ID, Customer, Size , Stitch count, number of colors, number of trims, number of stops, Type of file, description, creation date, edit the groups that the design is assigned to. The import function allows you to do a mass load of files from a CD or from a directory. There are pro's and con's to this method. Pro's - ability to import files in sequence. Con's - you cannot edit the information until after you have added them to librarian. - depending on the speed of your computer it is a slow process Librarian (Mass Load) In this screen you will need to select type of file and any rules for and then click add... High light the directory names and click on Create Link Then you can select your category or you can make a new category. Then click OK and click finish then it will load all the files in the directory. In the videos we will also show you how to setup and use librarian and how to access and search your designs. And how to use this tool as well as the rest of the software. If you take the time to learn librarian it will allow you to search and or browse all your designs easily. In addition it stores quite a bit of information about the design you would not normally have access too.

diver361

diver361

 

Embroidery on t-shirts: how to hoop in three minutes

Original text by: Nata Beloshveika Many of you have received big orders for t-shirts embroidered with logos. Sometimes rehooping takes more time than the embroidery process itself. I mean, the embroidery has to be in the same place on all items, if possible.  So what do we do? Should we do the measuring and marking every time? But it is quite a laborious task, and boring, too.  A solution exists! I want to show you my way of doing it.  Embroidery on t-shirts. Materials and tools:  A t-shirt  A machine embroidery design Upper thread Underthread Double-sided adhesive tape Printing paper  Embroidery stabilizer (Filmoplast)  A ruler or a triangular  Tailor's chalk, design knife, scissors  Embroidery on t-shirts. The making process:  I create all my designs by myself.  Previous to the beginning of the embroidery I run a guide stitch 5-7 mm away from the contour. Hoop one layer of printing paper. Run the guide stitch without a thread. Carefully cut out a window in the paper along the stitches with the knife. Stick a double-sided adhesive tape around the perimeter of the window. Take off the first layer of adhesive.  Now I'm going to mark out the placement of my future embroidery on the first t-shirt. To do this I measure the front side and mark the bottom left corner of the design with the chalk.  Onto the marked t-shirt I put a layer of printing paper in order to create a template for hooping other t-shirts. I draw all the necessary outlines there — neck hole, shoulders, arm-holes (for small size t-shirts, because the L-size ones will not fit into the A4 format), central line or placket line for a polo shirt. Also I mark the left corner of my future design with the cross.  Then I put the hoop on top of it, so that the cross on my template would be exactly in the lower left corner of the hoop.  This is important!  You should make sure that the hoop lines to the template and the t-shirt — check horizontal and vertical marks (vertical are very handy for checking against the knitwear loops), so that it would not move.  Then I trace the hoop contour (it's better to use a felt pen to make the lines visible of the wrong side of the template) and cut out the template along the construction lines (neck line, middle, arm hole). The template is ready! All of this has been a preparation job. Now we proceed to the hooping.  I cut a piece of filmoplast, so that it would cover all the adhesive tape frame. Stick it onto the adhesive tape, take off the protection layer.  I take the t-shirt inside out and put the template on top of the left (!!!) half of the t-shirt. Then I superimpose the neck hole, the central line and the arm-holes. Put a hoop on top of it (with the layer of adhesive facing down), superimposing the hoop and the template.  Carefully remove the template from under the hoop, so that it would not move. Once again carefully (the hoop must not move in relation to the t-shirt) fold the t-shirt around the hoop — first the sleeves and then the bottom.  Then I turn the whole thing over and stick filmoplast to the t-shirt, smoothing it out with one hand. Carry it to the machine, without turning it right way round.  Having unfolded the hoop on the side where the screw is, I set the hoop into the embroidery machine, smooth out the t-shirt under the foot and turn it the right way round to open the embroidery area.  Now I begin to embroider. After having completed I take off the hoop from the machine and carefully unstick filmoplast from the adhesive tape.  And after that I begin this all over again — stick filmoplast into the hoop, put a template on the t-shirt, stick the hoop to the t-shirt and embroider. All this is done very quickly and the result is of a high quality. I wish you the same!   

Irina

Irina

 

Introducting Tajima DG15 by Pulse


The new Tajima DG15 uses the same platform as Tajima DGML by Pulse Version 14 so the look and feel of the layout should seem quite familiar for those migrating over from version 14. If your migrating over from version 11, 12, or 13 you may want to read the document on setting your embroidery digitizing software up as many tool bars, and settings are optional. While this version looks quite similar to Version 14 they have stepped up the usability of the platform to include some key components that make this version stand out. NEW FEATURE The first thing I noticed apron installing the digitizing software is I can view all the PXF files on my computer using Windows Explorer and or My Computer, the trick with this is the files need to have the a picture embedded in the file. This will go a long ways to helping me sort out the files..   Pulse Cloud The second new feature will apply to shop that are expanding or network their machines they included a few different tools to allow you to move files around. The biggest advantage would be Pulse Cloud which is included with Tajima DG15 By Pulse, this allows you to some key mobility options for network machines including; Key Features of Pulse Cloud Browse Designs from any Device • Constant access to all your designs from any mobile device Create New Designs • Use templates to create beautiful personalized embroidery designs Monitor Machine Status • Keep an eye on your production floor from anywhere Send to Machine • Send a design straight to your embroidery machine from the Pulse Cloud This new add on allows you to store, manage, and browse 100,000 of your embroidery designs on multiple devices through the Pulse Cloud service, included with Tajima DG15. It also allows you to edit embroidery design, create new embroidery designs, monitor your machines, send machine embroidery designs from your mobile device. Contact your distributor on how this can work for you.. I am not sure of the restrictions or how to set it up, I do know there is an app for mobile devices for Pulse Cloud. This feature also allows you to share free embroidery designs on popular social media feeds.   Drop Box This is another new option great for customer that have their embroidery machine at one location and their digitizing software at another location. You can store your designs and move them to the drop box and open them up and edit them and save back to the drop box.   New Monogram Wizard This is the first time they have made the wizard for monogramming very simple to use, its great for someone who doesn't digitize or wants a simple but powerful tool to use to make monograms, this tool works with both the monogram fonts or regular fonts and offers a wide selection of borders, decorations and placement options., you can also edit the font per digit in this utility On the left side you can select your placement or style of text , on the right side you can select the font and or size, you can also change the border and the design all through this wizard and standard on this product. I found it very easy to use and their over 15 text placement styles, Access to all your fonts in your embroidery digitizing software, color of the font and size. You can have each letter a separate font and color too which makes it nice. To change a frame you select the frame and you can scroll through over 25 frames and over 25 decorations for inside the frame. You can also choose no frame or no decoration, and you can edit the decorations independently. Touch Screen Support This new feature also allows those of you to have touch screen monitors to use them with the software, I do not have a touch screen so I am not sure how it works. But it could for some applications be easy to use. Vector Tool Improvements They have made some improvements to the vector tools which can make it easier to slice and edit curves much like in Corel Draw. Embroidery Machine Instruction This new version will also allow you to implement warning or special instruction to the embroidery machine including, speed limitation and or notes. Vertical Text Tool This allows you to put text up or down great for arms and pant legs,   Wave Fill Options They also now allow you to use complex fill and carved tiles with the wave tool allowing for better creation of flags in my view then programmed runs but it great tool for other applications too. Improvement to Quotation Tool They made some changed to how the quotation tool works, I do not use this as I have my own template for quoting jobs for customers, but for a beginner its a great way to price jobs for yourself. Supports Corel Draw Version 7 This latest version also supports the latest version of Corel. In review , I installed the software on Windows 7 64 Bit Premium Edition with no issues, it made all the necessary updates as it installed the program, it doesn't over right any existing version which I like as I make videos and documentation for all versions. Pulse Cloud is available on all the current levels and the levels have not changed they still include Composer, Creator, Illustrator Extreme, Artist Pulse and Maestro.

diver361

diver361

 

On the quality of machine embroidery...

Original text by: unknown Everything has its reason, and it is good when these reasons can be analyzed and understood and mistakes prevented before the material has been hooped and stabilizers, fabrics, threads and, what's most important, time have been wasted. Are you familiar with the situation when you overexert yourself, but all you get is an ill-looking embroidery with objects dislocated and the fabric pulled? How to prevent it?  On the quality of machine embroidery Problems with a design  One of the reasons of a bad embroidery is a low quality design. The main signs of the low quality design are: the lack of basting where it is needed, large quantity of stitches that are too short or too long, and also Tatami fill, which is the result of an automatic processing (90% of the designs created automatically are of poor quality and can be more or less normally embroidered on dense, well-stabilized fabrics). If you come across such a design, the result will most probably be deplorable. The reason for this are the mistakes made by the designer in the process of digitizing a design or the ones made by the user in the process of altering it.  Identify a low quality design  How to do it? In future, when you gain sufficient experience, you will discern problems in a design at the first glance.  Problems with embroidery technique  You have made some mistakes when preparing a design and then embroidering it, which resulted in a work of poor quality. Like using a stabilizer in a wrong way or embroidering a design on a wrong type of fabric. For example, a beginner may embroider a dense design on leather. As a result, the embroidery may just fall out, because numerous needle perforations will separate the embroidered piece from the rest of the fabric.  Another embroidery technology mistake is loose hooping. The choice of a needle also may influence the quality of your embroidery. This particularly concerns embroidery on thin knitwear or such materials as leather, faux leather, upholstery fabrics and coated fabrics. Sure, you won't always have to put up with fabrics that give you problems, but you need to consider fabric+needle+thread in any case. For example, beginners and even experienced embroiderers often encounter a problem with embroidery on a perforated fabric or knitwear, because a thin and sharp embroidery needle only cuts the threads up. You should use a thin ballpoint needle for knits when working with such fabrics.  Leather, especially cordovan or the the thick one used for belts, should be embroidered with leather needles, and the use of designs such as Blackwork or Redwork, where stitches are sparse, is preferable. Disregard for the rules of embroidery making may lead to a disagreeable result. For example, in case when a thin film, which is intended to be used as an upper stabilizer, is used as an underlay for a fabric or a main stabilizer for lace.  Preparing for embroidery you should choose your stabilizer properly and carefully read the manual.  A very common mistake is to hoop the fabric in a wrong way. When the fabric is loose, there are creases and cramps on it. And of course, you'll get a defective result, even if the design is good. To get a neat embroidery, with an even fill and without any creases and shifting of the details, you need to press the fabric beforehand, in order to stabilize it properly, to straighten the fabric in the hoop (try not to overdo it!) and to tighten the hoop screw so that the fabric would not move. Another mistake made by many embroiderers, especially those who just begin to learn the technique by themselves, is embroidering a dense design on knitwear. Despite using a stabilizer an embroidery does not look good, because the fabric is pulled at the edges, and the embroidered area is much more rigid than the rest of the fabric, to the point where it seems like a piece of wax. If you have embroidered right on the item, without doing a test piece first, your favorite pullover or your client's jacket is ruined. To avoid problems like that choose the fabric that matches your design in density. Problems with equipment  If your machine breaks the thread  •    The main reason for it may be an accumulation of thread fragments and lint in the tensioner and also the dirt under the throat plate. 
Take off the top that covers the lamp (you won't lose your guarantee, but will be able see everything inside) and inspect your machine carefully (you can use a magnifier). If you find fragments of threads and other litter, remove them. 
•    One more reason for the thread breakage is the poor quality of embroidery threads.Try the threads of some other brand and see how they work in your machine.
•    The third reason for thread breakage are needles. The needles need to be replaced from time to time, because they wear down. It's not very economical to replace them often, but if the thread breakage continues, it's time to do it, because there may be a burr in the needle's eye.
•    Also the thread may break because of adhesive. Even adhesives specifically manufactured for machine embroidery may, if applied in large quantities, stick not only to the fabric, but to the needle, too. Lint accumulates, the thread gets stuck in it and breaks as a result. Clean your needles with a cotton swab dipped in alcohol and try to apply less adhesive in future. Too much stabilizer In some cases, such as embroidering a painting, you need it to be very dense, but a thin stabilizer or several layers of printing paper, which is used by many money-saving embroiderers, adds friction, so when the thread goes through a lot of layers, it becomes frayed and eventually breaks. What is the most unpleasant, the thread may be in this state for a while, and the machine won't signal its breakage, and the embroidery will be done incorrectly for a long time.  This won't happen if you choose a stabilizer of an appropriate density.  Too loose or too tight upper thread or underthread tension may have a negative impact on the quality of the embroidery. Underthread may show on the right side and ruin the look of your design. You need to regulate it, either by yourself, following the instructions in your manual, or with the help of a service engineer.  Loops on the wrong side usually appear when the upper thread is loose because it did not get between the tension discs. Some models have their own way of threading: in some the foot must be up, in the others — down. In order to fix it you need to rethread the machine, in accordance with the manual.  The automatic trimming between the objects does not always have a good impact on the design. For example, it's better not to trim a cross-stitch design that has numerous individual crosses lying very close to each other. In case of automatic trimming the you'll get a thick fringe of thread ends and the machine will have trouble embroidering.  Each case requires a unique approach, depending on the design, and you should turn down the automatic trimming option if needed, either in the software or in the machine.  This is an incomplete list of embroidery technique irregularities and the reasons for low quality output. Beginners sometimes get rather inventive. Nevertheless, if you read this and learn to avoid some mistakes, the success is guaranteed. We wish our readers to accomplish only the best quality while embroidering!

Irina

Irina

 

Embroidery techniques: cutwork with alignment

Original text by: Olga Ionova This master-class will tell you how to do cutwork embroidery. Cutwork embroidery has its own aspects, and if the design is beyond the hoop so that you have to join its parts together, the amount of the aspects doubles. This master-class will tell you how to do cutwork with alignment and border designs without the special hoop, but with the help of alignment stitches instead.  Cutwork embroidery. Materials: •    Fabric or an item to be embroidered 
•    Tearaway stabilizer 
•    Water soluble stabilizer (film)
•    Upper thread (white)
•    Underthread (white) Cutwork embroidery. The making process Prepare your fabric. Iron it and press the tearaway adhesive to the wrong side.  In keeping with the design do the marking. Mark the fabric in accordance with the plastic pattern of your hoop.  Tightly hoop the fabric and the stabilizer. You can add pins, too. Cutwork embroidery design must include several colors, which will mark the places for your machine to stop.  The first color will be a Ran stitch, also zigzag may be added. Having embroidered the first color, stop the machine and take the hoop off. Marked are the areas that will be cut out. These are always enclosed areas.  Don't unhoop the fabric! It must stay in the hoop.  With the help of scissors cut away the areas inside the objects from the stitching, trying not to damage it. Use the stork embroidery scissors or the ones that were specially designed for cutwork.  Put a layer of thin water soluble stabilizer on top of the fabric and secure it with pins. Set you hoops in your machine run the embroidery with the second color.  The embroidery consists of finishing the open areas with zigzag stitches and later with satin columns, while water soluble stabilizer is used as a substitute for the fabric. It holds the fabric and the cut-away details together.  The order of cutting and finishing depends upon the programmed sequence. The details here should be cut away and embroidered one after the other.  Embroider all the details as was described above.  Embroider all the elements of the design.  Cutwork embroidery. The alignment of the elements  When embroidering borders or repetitive design patterns you have to do the alignment. Therefore, draw the central line while doing the preparations. To get the exact match between the different parts the design must contain the alignment stitches and crosses (dots and lines). In the first part of the embroidery they are embroidered the last. The alignment spots marked violet on the photo.  If you add the alignment crosses by yourself (it can be done in any embroidery software editor), mark them with different color from that of the last part of the design.  You can mark the places where the needle will hit the alignment crosses by moving down the balance wheel, but not perforating the fabric. This works extremely good for leather.  The last part of the embroidery before next may include tacking down the first object of the part that will be hooped next. You can use this stitch as an additional alignment mark.  Cutwork embroidery. Rehooping  Take the embroidered detail out and press it flat, moving the iron carefully up and down. Never use steam!  Hoop the next part of the fabric to be embroidered in accordance with the marking and the hoop pattern.  Set you hoops in your machine and make sure that the first is the color of the alignment crosses. All alignment spots must match! You don't have to embroider them, just move the balance wheel down and see if the needle hits the marks.  After that the embroidery will go as was described above.  Having completed the embroidery, unhoop the fabric. Cut away the excessive water soluble stabilizer on both right and wrong side.  Tear away the tearaway adhesive stabilizer. Wash the water soluble stabilizer in the warm water until it will go off completely.  Dry the embroidery until it becomes only a bit wet.  Press your embroidery on something soft like a folded terry towel covered with a thin cloth. Press the embroidery flat in up and down motions only! Never move an iron side to side or back and force.  It's done!     

Irina

Irina

 

Splitting a design in PE Design using Photostitch design as an example

Original text by: Lisa Prass So, you have created or downloaded a machine embroidery design that does not fit you hoop. Now, to embroider the design, you should take a series of actions to split it. In this lesson I will show you how to split a design, how to add the alignment stitches and crosses, and how to save it into two different files, using a "Stitch" machine embroidery design in Photostitch technique as an example. The process includes several basic steps... Splitting a design: creating and positioning of the hoop  Using the Rectangle tool, create additional objects that will imitate your hoop. Place them in the embroidery area so that your machine embroidery design would be within these virtual hoops. If you don't like what you see, change the position of the hoop until you will achieve the result you want.  The hoops for which you split your design must have an intersection (remember what you learned about the intersection of sets at school?), otherwise the alignment with the help of crosses will be impossible. Splitting a design: how and where?  The main task of splitting a machine embroidery design is that the separating lines must not be seen when embroidering. Therefore, you should understand where it is better to split an object and whether it is possible to get along without splitting. Learn to split so as to hide the separating lines under the last embroidered objects. After splitting the design in your mind, proceed to do it in reality. Instructions on what splitting tool to use and how, you can find in video tutorials on Youtube. Having split the design, you now come to the next part: adding of the alignment stitches. Splitting a design: adding alignment stitches/crosses  Some people prefer alignment stitches, some use alignment crosses. Both are utilities allowing you to quickly and within the accuracy of 1 mm join two designs into one project while rehooping. Recommendations on what tools and with what preferences you should use when creating the utilities for making the joining process easier, you can find on Youtube.  Alignment stitches and crosses are always situated in the hoop intersection area and are present in both first and second parts of a design. In the first part of a design they are embroidered last, and in the second they are embroidered in the beginning. They must match together. If they match loosely, you should rehoop the fabric or change the design position in the hoop. If possible, place you alignment stitches and crosses where there will be no embroidery. If there is no such possibility, delete them after aligning. Splitting a design: saving  After having completed the splitting you should save the result into two different files, which will be embroidered one after the other, and choose which one of them will come first. In our example, we embroider the body first and then the head. Is it clear, why? Because if there is a minor offset, Stitch's head won't look like it is incorporated into his body. Before saving your design delete the virtual hoops, because they have completed their task and you won't need them anymore.  After this lesson you'll have 2 files as a result: Body. PES and Head.PES. Steps in these files go as follows:  Body.PES: First, you embroider all the objects of Stitch's body, then the alignment stitches and crosses.  Head.PES: First, you embroider all the stitches and crosses, and then all the objects of Stitch's head.

Irina

Irina

 

The reasons for thread breakage on domestic embroidery machines

Original text by: unknown Every embroiderer has been in a situation where an embroidery machine that was running smoothly only a day before, suddenly begins to break the upper or the underthread almost every stitch. Such a problem, in case you eliminate the possibility of mechanical breakage, is connected with certain processes, and also with the quality of the embroidery materials you use in your work. If such a situation occurs, try to solve the problem yourself before calling a service engineer. In this article we tried to describe possible problems and their solutions, ranking from the easiest to the complex ones. Resume the embroidery process after having done this or that, to check if the problem has disappeared.  Why does the thread breakage occur  Upper thread  Underthread  Stabilizer  Needle  Shuttle  1. Upper thread Tension regulation. Check your upper thread tension. Often the reason for the thread breakage may be too tight a tension.  Wrong threading may be the reason for thread breakage, too. In this case rethread your machine in accordance with the manual.  An upper thread of poor quality. If breakage occurred after replacing the upper thread, get back the bobbin you used before that. If breakage stops, buy embroidery threads of some other brand. Rayon thread. This thread often causes thread breakage trouble for beginners. Threads literally "leap off" the bobbins. This problem is very easily solved. Place a grid on the bobbin case and reduce the embroidery speed.  Metallic thread. When working with this thread use a special grid, set a needle for metallic threads, and also reduce the embroidery speed.  2. Underthread  The wrong size of the bobbin. However strange it might seem, such a problem exists. Check your manual to see what type of the bobbin is recommended for your machine.  Wrong winding may become the reason for thread breakage, too. In this case unwind the bobbin and rewind it after that.  Wrong threading. One of the common reasons for thread breakage. Carefully read that section in the manual that describes how to insert the bobbin, and do accordingly.  Thread thickness. One of the well-known reasons for thread breakage. Some of the sewing-embroidery machines just won't work with a very thin bobbin thread. In this case you should get a thicker thread.  All sewing and embroidery threads have their own thickness, determined by the number. The greater the number is, the thinner is the thread, and vise versa. For example: An upper thread #200 is thinner than #30  3. Stabilizer  Glue particles adhere to the thread and the needle, holding back their movement, which causes the thread to break. If that's the case, stop the machine, clean the needle with alcohol, and rethread. Repeat every time your thread breaks until the embroidery will be completed. After that refrain from using this particular type of adhesive stabilizer or spray adhesive in your work.  On the internet you can find many recommendations on the original use of various materials. You can count the use of double adhesive tape and sewing stabilizers, which are not manufactured specifically for our purpose and may cause thread breakage. The problem itself, together with the solution, was described above.  If the cleaning does not help and the thread continues to break, stop the embroidery and change the stabilizer.  4. Needle  A bent needle, burrs and a blunt needlepoint may also be the reason for thread breakage. In this case change the needle to a new one.  Also if the needle type is wrong for the particular kind of fabric, this may lead to the thread breakage, too. Read the information on how to choose needles, in our future articles. 5. Shuttle In some embroidery machines the bobbin case used for the embroidery is different from the one used for sewing. If you have encountered the problem with thread breakage, check the one that is currently in use.  Burrs on the bobbin case are often the reason for the thread breakage. Take out the case and inspect it. If there are burrs and scratches present, polish them with a soft abrasive cloth. When it will be possible, buy a new bobbin case.  Scratches on the throat plate caused by the needles hitting it may lead to the thread breakage. Inspect the throat plate from above and from below, and if you find burrs and scratches there, think of buying a new one.     

Irina

Irina

 

Tajima Pulse experience: Carving your Way

Carving Your Way Introduction to Line Carving   When it comes to digitizing vehicles, and other complex items the line tool can assist with adding dimension to the embroidery design with minimal embroidery effect on the stitch count this is great as stitch counts can be high when creating works of art.   The tool is available for higher level in Tajima DGML by Pulse, and is standard in Maestro level. This tool looks like the following in Tajima DGML by Pulse 14 or Tajima DG15.   The short cut for this tools is Shift + F10 on your keyboard. This tool works the best on fills or satin stitches and it works best going the opposite direction of the stitch angle. To use the tools follow the steps below.   1. Draw you shape with the complex fill tool, have the stitches going horizontal   2 Next with the Line Carving tool , draw a line across the image vertically or on a slight angle.   3. Complete the segment and force the embroidery digitizing software to regenerate by pressing Shift G and it will turn from a vector line to the above image.   This technique adds very little stitches , it basically tells the machine to stop and start again giving the appearance of two fills side by side. It only adds stitches where it needs to shorten them for the fill.   This tool can be applied to embroidery fills, and satin stitches and works well in designs where you do not want to use the run stitch or other tools. An example of where it can be used to add dimension is below.   In the above example the run stitches add decoration to the top of the tractor,and the line carved adds detail. These tools should compliment each other when used in the embroidery designs.   So if you have this tool you should learn when and how to use it, I use it a lot on vehicle designs, flower veins , and decorative stitches on patterns.

diver361

diver361

 

Learning series How to make Patches in Tajima DGML by Pulse


Patches Do you tremble when a customer comes in and asks you to do embroidery patches, patches is not as difficult as it may seem, but even if you do not want to digitize and make the patches your self you can out source the patches to companies that specialize in that sort of thing. Today we will take a look at digitizing tips for patches, supplies you will need and general information about patches. Equipment and supplies needed   12 x 12 hoop or 20 x 28 hoop tearaway backing (optional) Color of twill for the fabric Sheet of Heat n Press Glue Frabic fray check glue heat press or industrial iron Digitiizng the embroidery design   In the example below I have made a karate style patch with a black fill , white fill for the karate man, a run stitch for his outline and satin stitch for the lettering , and using the Pulse Font Judo Kick for the text. The border is a steil stitch with a density of 85 spi and has perpendicular and zig zag underlay.   In Tajima DGML by Pulse Version 14 or Tajima DG15 the embroidery digitizing software comes with a utility to make embroidered patches, and its fairly easy to do and works with a wide range of embroidery design types,   1. Digitize the file, save it to your PC 2. Goto File New , 3. CLICK on the PATCHES icon and a wizard will come up. 3. Once the file has been generated then we can goto through the process for hooping your fabric. I would recommend that you hoop the twill by itself but if you want backing to stabilize the twill use tearaway. 4. Load the embroidery design on your machine , center the embroidery designs and trace to make sure it fits. 5. Embroider the patches. 6. Remove from hoop , press to flatten the patches, ( recommend at heat press @ 320 degrees for 5 seconds 7. With some Fray check or clear glue , coat the edge of the threads around the patch. 8. Tear away the backing 9. Cut them into smaller pieces, and heat press Heat n Bond or similar glue material using a heat press for 10 seconds. @ 320 degrees 10. Trim around the steil stitch as close as possible, 11 . With the Fray Glue go around the edge to seal up any loose ends, repeat for all the patches..   Thats how easy it is to make a patch.

diver361

diver361

 

Tajima DG15 by Pulse new features and screenshots


Tajima Pulse version 15 new release! In the new version, we have improved many embroidery features of the program so you will have an increasingly productive tool compatible with new technologies. Have also improved integration with other apparel decoration specialties, making this version the most powerful multi-decoration professional embroidery digitizing software of the market. New features in Tajima DG15 to help increase your productivity include: Superior Anchor Point Functionality New Fill Options for Wave Effects and Complex Fills New Slice Options: Breakup, Rectangle Slice Advanced Quotation Estimator Increased Snapping Functionality Vertical Text Capability Touch-Screen Support Best Sequin Features in the Industry New Monogramming Wizard Accessible from your mobile device Superior Vector Features Users are easily able to add multiple anchor points. Anchor points can be quickly converted by pressing control and right clicking. Cusp to Smooth Smooth to Straight (results in Cusp) Symmetric to Smooth This new function helps users doing embroidery designs for carbon layer. Select one or more nodes with the Vertex Select Tool and right click on one of the selected nodes to open a function list for nodes. The Move Anchors option in this list allows users to enter values for selected nodes to be moved. Alignment features have been added for the following: Vertical alignment to top, bottom and center/none
Horizontal alignment to left, right and center/none Breakup can now be applied to virtual slice segments. This feature will breakup each sliced section. After breaking up, virtual slicing is lost and user can only use combine for branching. Rectangle Slice Tool has been created. New Fill Options for Wave & Complex Fills Standard and carved fills can be used together with a wave effect. This means that wave fills maintain the pattern assigned to them and do not distort the embroidery pattern. Revolving complex fill. Stitches generate in a revolving path Complex Fill Modifier will have repeats and patterns mirror those in complex fill. During stitch generation, it collects the overlapping outlines and settings and modifies the complex fill stitch generation in those overlapping areas.   Improved Quotation Estimator Users can rotate the 3D embroidery design image within the Quotation Estimator. This feature allows the user to pre-populate information from previously entered/stored customer data. Increased Snapping Functionality Users have the ability to select nodes and snap them to an art segment or snap them to grid. When modifying a segment snap to guidelines on the canvas. Snapping to anchor points is now available. Vertical Text Capability A Vertical Text Tool has been added. This tool includes vertical spacing between characters. The default value is 25% of the reference height of the embroidery font. Vertical text can be adjusted using vertical justify New embroidery machine integration features Display messages to machine operators on the controller through your design Set the maximum speed of the machine through your design Using the Latest Technology • DG15 takes advantage of the latest hardware and operating systems with powerful 64-bit processing and CorelDRAW X7 support PulseCloud lets you to create, manage and browse your machine embroidery designs from multiple devices. Moving into the cloud opens the door for various mobile and social possibilities, enabling you to take your business on-the-go and access your designs and machine status securely on multiple devices. • Browse your embroidery design portfolio • Create new embroidery designs and change text from templates • Send embroidery designs to machines • Monitor embroidery machine status

diver361

diver361

 

How to mark the position of your embroidery design on fabric before hooping

Original text by: Marina Belova Suddenly it struck me that marking the position of an embroidery design on fabric before hooping is a major stumbling block to me. Is is so because I often get fabrics and garments that cannot be marked with a leftover sliver of soap or even with a disappearing marker. Another reason for the issue being of such a great importance to me, because I don't have any magic device for positioning of the hoops and most probably won't have one in the nearest future. I mean one of those. In the course of my embroidery career I've learned several ways of marking various types of garments manually. Some of them were successful, others turned out to be a disaster; there were ones requiring a great deal of sweat and those that didn't require much time.  Let's begin with the least successful ones. Marking with a pencil. When I was just a beginner (and I started working with fabrics rather suddenly) I made this mistake. I marked the fabric with an ordinary pencil. And of course, I had to do it all over again, the cutting and the embroidery, because it turned out that the marks made with ordinary pencil do not wash off.  Marking with a tailor's chalk. I can tell from experience that marking your fabric with a chalk is not really a good idea, because it leaves traces on some types of fabrics.  Eventually I gained sufficient experience having changed several jobs that involved dealing with unique designs on very expensive fabrics, which were extremely tricky to mark. It took a long time, too, not just because marking itself is quite a task, but because the size of the fabric was usually 3X3.5 m. So we used the following ways instead: Marking a position with pins: first the center of the embroidery and then a couple of dots on X and Y axes. This is one of my favorites, because it is the quickest and never leaves any traces. But it's not always good. It is very handy when using a single needle Classic embroidery machine, which has a correction angle allowing for the machine to adjust to the fabric hooped rather haphazardly. Creasing all the necessary lines. A highly questionable operation, because it leaves crease marks on many types of fabric which could not be corrected with the help of a steam iron. Nevertheless, it can be used in some cases. Using special markers which disappear when exposed to light. I should point out that in my opinion the best disappearing markers are the cheap ones made in China. They make a thinner line that disappear more quickly then branded markers such as Madeira. But! They left an unwashable trace on several types of fabrics such as 100% cotton, which left me with a thought that one should test everything before using it.  Using markers easily erased by water. Well, they should be erased by water. It is not a problem in case you are going to wash your handiwork in future, but what if you don't? We used to carefully wash off the marks with a tampon, trying not to leave splotches. The thing is that some manufacturers use such a strong pigment (Hemline for example) that we had to do it 3 or 5 times, because after the fabric had dried off the marks appeared again. There are, of course, special erasers used with these two types of markers. But to buy both the marker and the eraser is not really cost-effective. Soap. A sliver of soap is very good: the outline can easily be washed off with water and removed with steam, too. But there is a fly in the ointment: first you should find the brand that does not leave greasy splotches (and even soap without additives can do that), and when you find one, it may not be possible to use it on the specific type of fabric. I found this out when working with natural silk.  And now, encore: basting.  Basting is the best way to mark your embroidery. Yes, I mean the one done with a plain needle and thread along the lines on the back of the fabric (if you have such a possibility, you'd better use your embroidery machine instead). Sometimes you cannot avoid a laborious job of drawing lines and basting. There were times when such an elaborate grid was needed for multiple hooping and lining up the elements of a design on the garment that it took me 4 or 5 hours to do the marking. But this method can be used wit practically every type of fabric including silk and silk velvet, which can damaged just by looking at it. And what won't one do to achieve a good result. Luckily, I haven't been working with a piece of a fabric about the size of a football field for some time now. But the question of placement and marking an embroidery remains one of the most important to me. I mostly work with similar garments nowadays, but the place for a design changes all the time. Up to a certain point in time towels and bathrobes made from terry cloth were my biggest problem. As they were mostly white, soap was out of question, because it would not be visible. Besides, the texture did not help much. That's why I made an outline with a disappearing marker and washed it off with water afterwords to make it disappear more quickly. But the terry cloth is a fabric of volume and bulk, so I had plenty to wash off, because the traces appeared again once the fabric was dry.  Once I was surfing the internet and stumbled across this photo where all the marks were made with writing pencil over the removable adhesive tape. This is how it works: first you place your garment onto the hooping device and do the hooping, then remove an adhesive tape and embroider. So I tried applying this to a terry cloth. It proved to be very handy, especially when embroidering a design in the corner of a towel, which is not very easy to place into round or square hoops. To embroider a corner in such a way is not the easiest task, but even to place it into the hoops is a problem. That's why I use frames when embroidering towels. Placing an unmarked fabric into the hoops is a skill I am yet to master. Though I'm not very eager to do so, because I have embroidered an incorrectly hooped garment in the past (I didn't know the proper way then). So, I need to embroider quite a big design in the corner of a towel. 1. I stick a piece of adhesive tape in the area where my marking is going to be. 2. Then I measure out all the distances and draw the lines. 3. Frame the fabric or the garment. 4. Trace it onto the fabric, then remove the adhesive tape. 5. Embroider a design. 6. Then I mark the back of a bathrobe before hooping.  You can use it for a big embroidery in the middle of a towel, too. That's all that is to it. You don't have to wash the marks off. Of course, you have to deal with adhesive, but it is only a trifling matter in comparison. One more way to mark your fabric is to use a tool called an alignment laser. It projects a perfect crosshair onto any surface you like.  To find the perfect center you should cut out your design pattern and place it onto your garment sprayed with a removable adhesive. Even if you misplace it slightly, you may always adjust the hoops.  And what do you do use to place a design onto the fabric? Share your placement tips and tricks, please. Did something escape my attention?
 

Irina

Irina

 

Melco Bravo Embroidery Machine

If you want to engage in embroidery on a professional level, you should buy a reliable embroidery equipment with manifold possibilities that won't fail at the most crucial moment. Melco Bravo is a highly efficient 16-needle embroidery machine designed for amateur embroiderers turned professionals. A distinguishing feature of this machine is that it provides maximum efficiency for it's price. Melco Bravo allows you to embroider high quality designs on garments, hats, bags and large variety of textile products. Thanks to a smaller lower cylinder arm you can embroider on a wider variety of products while maintaining high speed.  Acti-Feed™, the patent system of active thread supply automatically adjust the thread tension and provides smooth working process without any thread breakage. BRAVO OS, the embroidery machine operational system, controls the thread tension and it's supply by providing a portion of thread needed and basing thread-tensioning upon three separate parameters for every thread regulated by piezotransducer. The better-quality embroidery is made on high speeds because of the lesser thread breakage. The system also allows you to embroider on some types of fabric without the use of the underlay. Melco Bravo is an embroidery machine with manifold possibilities for doing business. The small diameter cylinder arm allows you to embroider on various products, including the areas hard to embroider and also wider designs on caps. Cylinder hoops allow you to embroider on smaller areas, such as pockets and shirtsleeves, and also children's garments. The use of laser positioning mechanism will enable you to position you design properly.  Download Melco Bravo brochure Melco Bravo comes with DesignShop Lite, a professional embroidery design editor. DesignShop Lite allows you to scale, mirror and rotate a design, edit it's main characteristics, such as density, type of the underlay and shape of the hoop, and also work with the text. Embroidery is always in trend. Embroider with Bravo!

Irina

Irina

×