Jump to content

Irina

Administrators
  • Content Count

    511
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    31

Irina last won the day on April 3

Irina had the most liked content!

Community Reputation

476 Excellent

2 Followers

About Irina

  • Rank
    Advanced Member

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Female

Recent Profile Visitors

The recent visitors block is disabled and is not being shown to other users.

  1. Unfortunately, it wasn't in the article ( Maybe Igor can ask the author.
  2. Embroidery techniques: Sewing a pumpkin-shaped pincushion Internet has an endless supply of ideas. For a long time I’ve been creating round pincushions, simple and artless. And then I suddenly read that by tying it up with a cord, you can turn a round pincushion into a sort of pumpkin. And so cute it seemed to me that I’ve only been using the pumpkin pincushion in my work ever since. Besides, people now only ask pumpkin-shaped pincushions for presents. Sewing a pumpkin-shaped pincushion. Materials Sole-colored cotton Tearaway adhesive stabilizer Upper thread Underthread Scissors Decorative button or bead Cord or mouline threads Batting (wool, polyester, quilting cotton) Machine embroidery design Sewing a pumpkin-shaped pincushion. The making process If you have bought a design in the store or created it by yourself, hoop the fabric and hit the start button. I secured cotton with a tearaway adhesive stabilizer (it is my favorite–so easy to work with). You’ll need to stitch the design twice. You can make the sides identical or use two different color schemes. You can also spare the flowers and only embroider the circle on the lower side. The bottom half can do without the embroidery. When the embroidery is finished, remove the stabilizer and cut the upper and lower panels along the stitching, leaving seam allowance. Sew them together by hand, like biscornu, catching the back stitches with your needle. When only a small gap is left, stuff your pincushion through it. You can cover the stitching between the two halves of the pincushion with a cord, carefully sewing it along. Near the end, insert a cord or several mouline strands into the eye of a needle and wrap it around the pincushion. I usually divide mine pincushions into 8 parts. You can do less or more, whichever suits you best. Having done that, pass your needle through the center of the pincushion and fix the thread on both sides. To disguise the knot, cover it with a decorative button. Done! The actual making and assembling takes much less time than you may think from the description. Try it! You’ll definitely make it. Original text by Mary Stratan
  3. Thank you! Stay with us ) We'll share more useful articles )
  4. Embroidering a pocket: Kitteh This adorable and perky kitteh captivated me the moment I’ve seen the design. Lisa Prass, who created it, suggested giving some volume to this cutie. Read on to know what became of it. For a long time, I've had a soft spot for felines. When I was a child, I used to bring home kittens in my pockets, and they peeked out just like the one does in the design, which I instantly named KitteH. The embroidery took very little of my time. For it, I needed the design rendered in the Photostitch technique, an embroidery machine, a pair of jeans with pockets (a pocket flap, too, fell victim to the Kitteh’s charms and was pitilessly ripped off), embroidery threads, and, of course, the cheerful mood. First of all, I ripped off the pocket flap; in case your jeans come without one, skip this. After that, I undid the seam (the ordinary, not the decorative one). It was the inner seam in my case. I conceived my Kitteh puffy, and now was time to think how to add the volume. Having discussed the matter with the creator, I decided to embroider the cute kitten’s paw separately. I embroidered the paw on organza stabilized with the solvent stab and understood that it was too soft. Having tried several options, I finally chose the three-layer “sandwich” that consisted of a solvent stabilizer, fine mesh fabric, and organza as my base fabric. The embroidery took about 15 minutes. While the machine was going, I had time for a cup of coffee. That’s why I love machine embroidery: the machine is doing the work while I rest :-) Having stitched the paw, I trimmed it close to the stitching, washed out the stabilizer under the tap, and finished the organza edges with a lighter. The paw was ready! Now was the time to embroider the rest of my kitteh. I hooped the tearaway stabilizer. I should note that denim is quite stable as it is, so I don't reinforce it with adhesive stabilizers as a rule. With a temporary spray adhesive, I glued my denim piece to the stab and pinned it for better security. Using a layout grid and the machine’s display, I aligned the design to the pocket entrance. I checked the hooping accuracy with an outline, marking the place where the paw would go. Then I changed the thread color and stitched the paw to the main part. After that, the kitteh’s body and head were embroidered. All done. Some time, a good mood and an embroidery machine were all it took. Easy stitching to you all and have a good day! Original text by Irina Lisitsa Design available here
  5. Felt bag decorated with machine embroidery Felt is a wonderful fabric. You can decorate items with it or use it for sewing bags. I sewed this bag without a ready pattern or complicated calculations, by the eye. My pattern consisted of three rectangular panels and two stripes, cut out of felt. The bag was embellished with machine embroidery and decorative trim. A tip: you can choose any other machine embroidery design from our shop and make your bag look casual or romantic. Felt bag decorated with machine embroidery. Materials Decorative felt Bright cotton fabric Tearaway nonadhesive stabilizer Water-soluble stabilizer (film) Upper thread Underthread Machine embroidery design Embroidery or sewing and embroidery machine Embroidery machine hoop and template Felt bag decorated with machine embroidery. Embroidery process Out of felt, cut a rectangle size 18 x 22 cm. This will make a panel for your future bag. You’ll need three such panels. Two of them will make the bag, and the third will become a flap cover. Hoop the cutaway nonadhesive stabilizer, sprinkle it with a temporary spray adhesive and press the felt to it. Cover the felt with a piece of water-soluble film. In the embroidery editor, add a basting stitch outline to the design. Load the design into your embroidery machine and hit the start button. I used a common polyester thread; though it is not recommended for machine embroidery as a rule, you can use it in some cases. After you've used cotton or polyester threads, clean the shuttle thoroughly. Change the thread colors in accordance with the chart. Felt bag decorated with machine embroidery: sewing Before joining the panels, remove the water-soluble stabilizer: it will tear easily after the embroidery. Round the corners of the two panels constitute the bag. Round the corners of the panel intended for the flap. Finish the edge with decorative trim. Cut out a strip of fabric 4 cm wide to make a strap for your bag. Adorn it with a strip of fabric or decorative trim. Out of the fabric, cut out the lining. Turn in the seam allowance on the edges and baste. Attach the two parts of a magnetic clasp to the front side of the bag and the flap. Lay the lining and the flap together with their wrong sides facing each other and tack them down in order to avoid shifting during stitching. You may sew from the front or the back. When joining the panels, use a hemmer foot or an omni-purpose foot. Stitch your flap to the back side of the bag. Cut out a strip 6 cm wide for the side. Stitch this strip first to the back side of the bag, then to the front. Before sewing the felt panels, baste them first. Your felt bag decorated with machine embroidery is ready! Original text by Irina Lisitsa
  6. Thank you! We're glad the article was helpful. Please stay with us )
  7. How to embroider hard-to-reach areas of clothing? If you like one-of-kind jeans or wish to revamp your favorite pair, you can do it with comparative ease, using just an embroidery machine and your imagination. In this article, I’ll tell you how to embroider the pocket of jeans thus turning them into something original. Small items of clothing, such as jeans’ pockets, belts, straps, yokes, cuffs are somewhat difficult to embroider, being impossible to hoop. There are, however, some ways of doing it quickly and easily. I’ll be happy to tell you about them! For the embroidery, you’ll need: Embroidery machine or sewing and embroidery machine, Your favorite pair of jeans, Embroidery stabilizer (Filmoplast adhesive paper by Gunold will do nicely.), Embroidery threads of the necessary color (Madeira Rayon #40 or Gunold Poly #40), Bobbin thread of the same color as the fabric (Amman Belfil C #120), Thick threads for the jeans, same color as the stitchout (Madeira Aerofil #35), Machine embroidery needles of the corresponding thickness, with a reinforced blade (Schmetz Jeans), Embroidery needle (Schmetz Embroidery #90). First, rip off the pocket and iron it, removing the excessive threads. Carefully inspect your pocket to see whether it has any metal eyelets or decorative stitching. A layout grid comes with your embroidery machine. With it, you may position the design on the pocket the way you like. If there eyelets and rivets in that place, they should be removed so as to save your needle from breaking during the embroidery. If you don’t need the decorative stitching as part of your design, rip it off. Press the pocket with an iron once again. Prepare the stabilizer and the hoop. Filmoplast is an embroidery stabilizer with an adhesive layer covered with paper. Hoop it with the paper layer facing up. Position your pocket on top of it and jot down the placement marks with a marker. If you only embroider one pocket, it’s better to place it in the center of the hoop. In order to attach our pocket before the embroidery, you’ll need to remove the upper layer of the stabilizer (the paper one). Gently peel off the paper and press the pocket onto the adhesive area between the marks. You’re now done with the preparation. You may proceed to the embroidery. It is crucial to correctly position the design in the hoop because the entire design has to fit in. I used my Husqvarna Designer sewing and embroidery machine. Its full-color touch panel display allows you to choose an appropriate hoop (which now circumscribes your pocket) and position the embroidery where you want it. With the help of a layout grid in the hoop and another one on the touch panel display, it will be an easy job. You can check whether everything is correct by touching the design positioning button. On the screen, you’ll be able to see whether the design should be shifted a bit or rotated (see the manual that comes with your embroidery machine or ask the seller). Your embroidery is ready. Take the hoop off the machine. Carefully tear off your embroidered pocket from the stabilizer. It will be easy to do while still in the hoop because the needle soft of cuts it along the edges of the embroidery. You only need to iron the pocket and sew it back on. Thus, you have decorated your old jeans. With a sleight of hand and no fraud, you are now the owner of a one-of-a-kind pair of jeans! Wear it happily! Original text by Irina Yemelyanova
  8. Danke! Sorry, my German is very limited. I'm afraid the design is not for sale. The author, Irina Lisitsa, created it herself. Perhaps you can create your own? Or find something suitable in our Store?
  9. Making patchwork quilt on the embroidery machine Level: beginner. If you are fond of both quilting and machine embroidery, this tutorial is for you. Do want to make high-quality quilt blocks quickly? Patchwork quilt on the embroidery machine: high quality without painstaking and time-consuming work. Just a few easy steps will enable you to decorate your project with an ornate stitched pattern. Patchwork quilt on the embroidery machine: Materials: Upper fabric (front) Mid-layer (batting) Lower fabric (back) Upper thread Machine embroidery design (straight stitch) Visit our store to find a suitable embroidery design! Patchwork quilt on the embroidery machine: preparations Load the design into the embroidery machine or use the one from the memory. Activate the Basting option. Hoop the mid-layer only. For the mid-layer, you may use a high-loft polyester batting (150 gsm, two layers), cotton batting or any other kind of wadding for quilt. Choose your batting in accordance with your needs and the desired outer look of the ready item. In this tutorial, we’re going to quilt both the front and the back. In order to attain high quality and a beautiful back side, use identical upper and lower threads. Secure a piece of the backing fabric on the wrong side of the hoop with the help of a temporary spray adhesive. The wrong side of the fabric should face the batting. The piece of fabric should be approximately 5 cm larger than the ready quilt block on each side. When you make a quilt with the high-loft mid-layer, the covering fabric will get smaller, hence the shrinkage allowance. Patchwork quilt on the embroidery machine: machine embroidery Having attached the hoop to the machine, cover it with the fabric for the front, with its wrong side facing down. Hit the start button. With the Basting option turned on, all layers of the future block are first stitched together with a basting stitch. If your machine doesn’t have this option, create an outline with straight stitches no less than 7 mm long in any embroidery software. You will be able to use this outline for basting in your future projects. The outline comes first in the sewing order, before the design. After the embroidery is finished, you’ll have a ready quilt block. The front and back will look equally fine due to the identical threads. Original text by Irina Lisitsa
  10. Monograms are stylized initials of somebody’s name, surname or patronym. A monogram is a personal logo of sorts. Known since the 4th century BCE, monograms have a very long history. Embroidering a monogram is an excellent and popular way of creating a personalized gift. You can embroider on anything, including bath and kitchen towels, clothes, bed linen, handkerchiefs, pillows, lambrequins, bags and toys. These are just a few of the things that can be given as gifts. A thought struck me just now that there are common traditions one must stick to in order to avoid making a blunder. It turned out, there exists a monogram creation and usage etiquette. According to it, you need to know for whom the monogram is intended and to separate a person from a couple, a man from a woman, a kid from the betrothed. This knowledge will define the typography. In every case, there are nuances. Everybody knows, for instance, that monograms are always read from left to right and from top to bottom. A traditional way of creating monograms Choosing a font According to the tradition, all the letters in a monogram are capital and should be of the same type. Square letters are for men, slant handwritten letters – for women and married couples, and calligraphic script is for women only. You can read more on the topic in my article about Fonts. Types of monograms. The outer look In a woman’s monogram the first initial is a name, a small letter. The second is a surname. This is the biggest letter in the monogram. And the third initial is a patronym, again, a small letter. In a man’s monogram, the order is the same, but all the letters are equal in size. It is possible to omit the patronym in a monogram. If that’s the case, you first write the name, then the surname, the initials being equal in size. As a rule, a child’s monogram consists of only 1 letter. In a monogram for a married couple, the first, small, initial belongs to the wife. A big initial denoting a surname follows, then comes the husband’s initial – again, small. The levels at which the letters are placed, may be different. If a couple has double surname, these 2 initials are made big and positioned in the center. For household use, you might employ just one letter in a monogram – a surname. Naturally, there exist simple monograms, consisting of separate letters, and also of linked ones. Monograms usage If a monogram contains several letters, it is intended for official use. One letter is for unofficial cases. A modern way of creating monograms It’s XXI century now, many things have been changed and simplified, so now we have an opportunity of using any style we like, even the most bizarre. Yes, the way you like, not the conventional way. Choosing a font There is a great variety of fonts that can be used in monograms. Traditional types with serifs are still popular, but there are also the ones without; fancy fonts with excessive decoration in the form of flowers, leaves, berries in a so called “French style” are very common. And of course, one cannot forget to mention the convoluted calligraphic script, which is widely used to this very day. Men’s and women’s preferences in the character style have changed as well. Nowadays women prefer simple elegant fonts. One multicharacter monogram may contain fonts of different styles, in order to reflect the personality of its owner. The outer look Many women’s monograms of today consist of just 1 letter (denoting either a name or a surname), and men’s still have 3. If all 3 of the letters are of equal size, their sequence is changed: first comes the name, then the patronym, and the surname is the last. Personal monograms of 2 letters (name and surname initials) are possible. Both 2-letter (two names) and 4-letter (two names, two surnames) monograms can be used for the betrothed. The sequence of letters is not fundamental as it used to be. But those in the know advise following the tradition when creating monograms for bed linen, decorations and silverware. Monograms are often fit into a geometrical figure: a circle, an oval, a diamond, etc. Garlands of flowers, crests, crowns and wreaths of various kinds may be used as well. Apart from the initials, an entire name is often embroidered today – one should keep this in mind. The collection of ancient monograms, now in public domain, can be found on the Web and used as a starting point for your own creative effort. The only thing you’ll need to do is to follow the rules above. There is a huge variety of the already existing monogram templates. They can be incorporated into the average embroidery software. Some editors are even tooled for the creation of monograms only. Here you can find free monograms from the (Stitch Era Universal). You can see similar ones in any other editor, only chances are that there will be more of them there than coming from a free source. Well, they’re not the sharpest tools in the shed, but these monograms are better than nothing if you need to create a present. Read how the embroidery designs, monograms included, are usually positioned on an item. So, if you cannot draw or don’t like what you see in the free circulation, you can turn to a professional that creates various monograms to order. And if you need something simple to embroider it on an item, you can use a very handy application that has a built-in set of various fonts, vignettes, monograms, emblems and crowns.
  11. Thank you! We appreciate comments, even to the older articles )
  12. Original text by Marina Belova I wonder if anyone will ever argue that blending thread colors in machine embroidery is slightly different from blending printing colors or paints? But then again, even in painting, there have long been attempts to prove I.Newton’s classic theory of colors wrong. For those who are interested, there’s a book by Michael Wilcox called Blue and Yellow Don’t Make Green – go and read it. But let’s get back to the topic. All guides, books, and other information materials on color formation in machine embroidery are nevertheless based on Newton’s classic color wheel. For the sheer reason that you have nothing except them and your own experience to rely upon. Besides, choosing a right color with the help of the color wheel is much better than without it. Especially for the neophytes. That’s why I will take the liberty of touching on the subject of color in a machine embroidery design. Colors can be divided into 2 groups: Chromatic – the colors of the spectrum. Achromatic – white, black and all shades of gray. Let’s look at the canonical 12-part color wheel made of chromatic colors: It’s basis is formed by just 3 colors: yellow, red and blue (marked “I” in the photo). These are called primary colors, as they cannot be obtained by mixing other colors together. Secondary colors result from the intemingling of the two primary colors. In the photo, they are marked “II”. These are orange, green and purple. Tertiary colors are made by mixing two of the secondary colors (marked “III” in the photo). These are yellow-orange, red-orange, red-purple, blue-purple, blue-green and yellow-green. Also, there are such concepts as: Color hue – a property of color that defines its tone; we usually have separate names for them (lilac, magenta, etc.). Lightness – the shade of lightness/darkness. To get a shade you add some white or black to your source color. A mixture of color with white is called tint, and a mixture of color with black is shade. Saturation is the degree of intensity and purity of the color. Color temperature is connected to the idea of colors being “cool” or “warm”. On the basis of this idea, all colors are divided into warm, cool and neutral. There are several ways of creating harmonious color schemes, containing 2–4 colors, with the help of the wheel. For example: Mono – includes one color in different values. In this case, we only add shades and tints. Complementary – mixing of 2 (contrasting) colors on the opposite sides of the diagonal. Triadic – mixing of 3 colors that are located at the corners of the equilateral triangle: Mixing 3 analogous colors: Analogous colors are those that follow each other on the color wheel. Split-complementary: mixing 3 colors – two analogous and one contrasting. Mixing 4 colors: 3 analogous and 1 contrasting. Tetrad: mixing 4 colors arranged into two complementary pairs. Besides the ones above, there are other color harmonies that can be found in books and on the Web. The only thing left is to do is to practice, and don’t forget that the threads cannot blend together like paints. Also, the stitch types, stitch angles, textures selected will make their not so small impact on the end result. I’m curious if any software has algorithms helping to choose threads automatically, on the basis of the existing thread color palette, but using the methods described above?
×
×
  • Create New...