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  1. Make your own bias binding When sewing a garment, every little detail counts. However, it often happens that the most important one is missing. What if you need a bias binding, and the nearby craft shop has all the wrong colors? In that case, you can create your own bias binding. Read this article to learn how to make the binding of the right size, what tools to use and how to sew bias binding on the garment. Bias binding. Tools There are all kinds of tools for making bias binding that come in a variety of shapes; you can buy it in a specialty store. The number on a tool shows the width of bias binding with the folded edges. The double binding is two times narrower after being sewn on the edge of the garment. Bias binding. Tool size 6 mm—for the “textile mosaic” technique, which is used for decoration of dresses, shirts and so on. 12 mm—narrow bias binding, the width on a garment only 0.6 cm. It is cut from lightweight fabrics. Neck holes and armholes of the dresses/tunics, seams of the “high-class” garments, buttonholes on trousers and skirts. 18 mm—a good edge finishing for the garments or homemade textiles. It is, perhaps, the most common size, for you see it in the stores most often. This kind of binding is 0.9 cm wide when sewn. 25 mm—mostly for home textiles, table linen, kid’s clothes, such as bibs, pinafores, etc. 50 mm—almost a cording. It is used in the same way as 25 mm binding. The template should be exactly two times wider than the ready binding. For example, If you want 12 mm binding, you should cut a 12*2 = 24 mm tape. Align your fabric with the weft thread and the crosswise grain of the fabric (the one that runs along the selvage). Trim the selvage. Use a triangle ruler or a quilting ruler or fold the fabric at a 45° angle. Bias binding. Sewing the strips into one continuous tape Set the quilting foot with a blade on your machine, and select the straight stitch with the needle in a center position. Place the ends of the strips one over another with a 7 mm overlap, right sides together. The overlap is there for the stitching line that will join the strips. Stitch back and forth a few times at the beginning and the end. After sewing, press the seams open and flat. Trim the “dog ears”. Bias binding. Shaping Cut your binding on the bias; it will be easier to insert it into the bias binding maker this way. Feed the strip into the wide end of the maker and pull it out of the narrow one. You may poke it with a needle if the fabric is of a heavier kind. The strip of fabric will come out with folded edges. All you’ll need is to press them with an iron. Bias binding. Sewing The methods of attaching bias binding to the garment are aplenty. There are feet designed specifically for the purpose, which can be used in a variety of ways. We described one of them in our previous articles: Original text by Irina Lisitsa
  2. DIY anime style backpack Pause for a moment and consider: how many pairs of jeans are there in your wardrobe and how many of those you haven’t put on for ages? A pair of jeans that is not fashionable anymore or the one you're bored with can be given a new life with just a trifle of effort. Uncover your sewing and embroidery machine! Let’s create an anime style backpack for you or one of your friends. Read this tutorial to learn hot. Are you with us? DIY anime style backpack. Materials A pair of jeans Lining fabric Zipper Bias binding (4 cm wide) Padding fabric Machine embroidery design Sewing and embroidery machine Machine embroidery threads DIY anime style backpack. Embroidery For this tutorial, I used a design already embroidered on a piece of white cotton fabric. You may do the embroidery right on the fabric you’ve chosen for your backpack if you want. The embroidery itself is easy. Attach a piece of tearaway adhesive stabilizer of appropriate weight to the wrong side of your fabric and hoop the whole thing. Load the design into the embroidery machine and attach the hoop. Hit the start button and do the embroidery, changing colors in accordance with the color chart that comes with your design. DIY anime style backpack. Sewing Out of the legs of your jeans, cut two rectangular pieces. You can make them any size you like; I used a pair of sneakers and a zipper as a reference. The resulting panels measured 40 x 30 cm. Place a zipper between the two denim pieces and join them with straight lines of stitches. Use a standard zipper foot. Now the front panel is ready. Check the measurements by placing your item of reference (sports shoes in my case) on top of it. Round the edges using a French curve or a soup bowl of a suitable diameter. Cut the identical panel for the back side of the backpack. Now you can cut the panels out of the padding and the lining fabrics. Place the back panel on top of the padding piece and draw the stitching pattern (diagonal squares in our case). Attach the walking foot and stitch along the traced lines. DIY anime style backpack. Appliqué Out of the embroidered piece, cut the design, leaving 2 cm allowance along the perimeter. Secure it of one of the two halves of the front panel. You can pin it or use a glue pencil or temporary spray adhesive. Choose the threads to match the color of your fabric. I picked the ones I used while embroidering the design: cyan for the hair, mauve for the skirt, etc. Straight stitch along the perimeter (stitch length 2, the needle in the center position). Trim the extra material close to the stitching line. Secure the embroidered panel with a zigzag stitch (the needle in the center position). Many computerized sewing machines with a speed regulator have an option of smooth zigzag width adjustment. Use the manual that comes with your equipment to learn what it’s capable of. Stitch the lining to the front panel along the zipper tape; after that, secure the lining along the edges. Sew the lining to the back panel close to the edge. Cut the denim leftovers to strips 7 cm wide for the side panels. Stitch together the short sides of the strips to make one long piece. Place this piece on top of the padding fabric and join it with the piece of lining. Join them with parallel straight lines of stitches. Trim the projecting edges of the padding and the lining fabrics. Fold the long side piece in two and find its center. Join the center of the long piece to the top of the backpack and baste the panels, leaving allowance on the right side. Having reached the center on the bottom side, mark the crossline and cut the extra material, leaving 1 cm for seam allowance. Sew the piece in the center and baste it to another panel of the backpack. Prepare a rectangular piece of fabric for the strap. Baste the hanger to the back side. Straight stitch through all layers. Trim the edges and finish them with the bias binding. Read about different ways of attaching the binding here: Original text by Irina Lisitsa Visit our store for oriental embroidery designs
  3. Thank you for reading us and for your kind commentaries )
  4. Sewing textile envelope: a tutorial Every little fashionista will be happy to have a pretty textile envelope for hairpins, hair ties, and other knickknacks. We’ll find appropriate summer colors, adding a bright touch with a decorative fabric. To add still more flavor, we’ll give the edges a special finish and embroider the owner’s signature. Read this tutorial and how to sew and embroider a textile envelope. Textile envelope: materials Fabrics (two colors) and cotton fabric band Bias binding (a ready one or made of the decorative fabric) Quilting foot (Art.F057:XC7416252) Edge foot (Art. F056N:XC6441252) Sewing threads, scissors or a rotary fabric cutter, and a cutting mat A piece of Velcro and a decorative button See how to create a bias binding in Sewing tutorials: bias binding article (coming soon!). Textile envelope: cutting For a 15 x 28 cm, prepare the following: A square 30 x 30 cm out of the main fabric (the one with flowers) A square 30 x 30 cm cut out of the decorative fabric Bias binding (1.8 cm wide), a strip of fabric 30 cm long, and also a strip 150 cm long A cotton fabric decorative band 30 cm long A piece of Velcro size 0.5 x 2 cm. If there is no Velcro, you can use a button or a pair of strings. Textile envelope: sewing On your machine, select a straight stitch and lead the needle in the center position. Install the quilting foot with the guide. Fold the decorative fabric square and press the crease with an iron. Fold the panels with their right sides together and join them with the stitchline (don’t forget the seam allowance). The blade on the quilting foot makes stitching at an even distance from the edge much easier. Finish the edges with an overlock or use one of the edge seams on your sewing machine. Reduce the stitch length and sew on the decorative ribbon, aligning its straight edge with the crease. Fold the envelope so that its lower edge aligns with the seam joining the two fabrics, and the upper one with the folding line. If necessary, you can trim the edges a bit. Finish the edges of the bias binding with a strip of the decorative fabric 30 cm wide. If you prepare your binding by folding it in two and pressing the crease with an iron, you will be able to use the quilting foot for sewing it on. Now, reduce the length of the envelope to 28 cm. A cutting mat, a rotary fabric cutter, and a ruler will help you with this. Round the edges of the outer panel. Finish the edges with the bias binding. The lower part of the envelope and the pocket should be processed together. If you're an experienced sewer, just pin the details together and stitch, and if a beginner, baste them first. Stitch the bias binding to the envelope. Textile envelope: embroidery You can personalize your envelope with machine embroidery. Brother sewing and embroidery machines have lots of in-built character sets for inscriptions. Create an inscription of a suitable size, using a character set of your choice. Hoop the nonadhesive tearaway stabilizer, sprinkle it slightly with a temporary spray adhesive and secure the flap. Do the embroidery and remove the stabilizer leftovers. Place the panel on a soft underlay with the right side of the embroidery facing down and iron it. Attach Velcro to the flap and the main part of the envelope so that it could safely close. Sew on a decorative button. All finished! Pleasant sewing! Original text by Irina Lisitsa
  5. Hi Mila! I'm glad you like the article ) There is a link in it to our store where you can find a logo to your liking. We have lots of them ) The one in the article is there just for illustration.
  6. Sewing toys: a machine embroidered soft ball It is relatively easy to sew a child’s toy: there are a lot of patterns on the Web. If you have an embroidery machine, you can decorate the toy with the monogram with the child’s initials, the name of his or her favorite group or sports team. There are tons of possible variants. Read this tutorial and learn how to assemble a soft ball from appliqué panels. Sewing toys: materials Machine embroidery design Felt 2 mm thick, 3 colors Tearaway nonadhesive stabilizer Upper thread Underthread Sewing toys: sewing order Load the design into your embroidery or sewing and embroidery machine. Hoop a nonadhesive tearaway stabilizer, attach it to the embroidery machine and embroider the first line, which will serve as a guide for positioning your felt panels. After that, the machine will stop and you will place your felt panels of different colors onto the stabilizer. I've conceived a two-color soft ball. The stitchline of the next color will join the felt and the stabilizer, and the one after that will serve as a guide for the manual sewing of the panels. Depending on the design you've chosen (mine is appliqué), you’ll need to change the upper thread color. In appliqué, the layers are sewn on one after the other. In this case, it’s yellow, like the future logo background. Having sewn on the detail of your future appliqué, trim the edge with sharp scissors. After that, you embroider the appliqué panel. On another panel of my ball, I’ve decided to place a child’s initial. For this, I used the character sets from the Brother Innov-is LE memory. I enlarged the letter using the resize option. All manipulations with letters should be performed before the embroidery starts, in the Embroidery Edit mode! Having finished the embroidery, remove the leftovers of your tearaway from the panels and cut them, leaving 0.5 to 1 cm allowance. Sew the details like a biscornu pincushion (translator's note: a tutorial will be added in the nearest future!) Visit our store for an Embroidery library of logos! Original text by Irina Lisitsa
  7. The “Hawaiian” bag It’s spring, at last, the sun comes out more and more frequently and twinkles between the tree branches. Soon, the emerald-green verdure will appear and nature will dress in the rainbow colors. Time has come to sew a new vibrant-colored bag for the spring-summer season. Read this step-by-step tutorial to know how. For this job, you’ll need: ScanNCut – an electronic cutting machine Iron-on contact sheet for the appliqué A piece of black fabric 82 x 50 cm Two brightly colored zippers, each 18°cm long Hot melt glue voluminous adhesive for making the bag harder 4 pieces of bright sole-colored fabrics 15 x 15 cm each 4 appliqué printouts, 13 x 13 cm You can download them on the Web Black and colored sewing threads The “Hawaiian” bag: cutting out the panels Cut the panels of the future bag out of the black fabric: 4 pieces,15 x 15 cm each, for the appliqué 2 pieces, 62 x8 cm each, for the bag's top and bottom 1 piece, 23 x11 cm, 1 piece, 23 x 8 cm, 1 piece, 23 x12 cm, for the insert on the back side 4 pieces, 23 x 12 cm each, for the pockets 1 piece, 82 x5 cm, for the top of the bag 2 pieces, 70 x 10 cm each, for the handles The “Hawaiian” bag: preparing the fabric for ScanNCut Take an iron and press the hot melt glue backing to the wrong side of the 15 x 15 cm piece of fabric; the sticker with a picture of an iron should be facing up. After the fabric has cooled, peel off the protective paper from the wrong side of the fabric. Secure the fabric on the cutting mat and do the test cut (blade length 5, pressure 3). If the test cut was successful (the fabric was cut and the mat wasn’t), proceed to the next step. Stick the printout onto your mat. Select Direct Cut. The machine will scan the surface of the mat and the image will appear on the screen. Select the image No 3 and save it. Now go to the Saved Objects and open the saved file on your screen. Check if the image was scanned correctly. Sometimes the machine adds extra dashes and lines while scanning. Select them and press Del. Secure the fabric and scan the surface of the mat. Place the image so that it doesn't cross the edges of the fabric. Cut. Using a spatula, designed specifically for this purpose, detach the fabric from the mat. You can make two appliqué pieces from this cutout. I used the outer side for my bag. Put the appliqué piece on top of the bright sole-colored fabric and iron it. In the same fashion, cut the rest of the appliqué pieces and press them with the iron to the fabric. Position all four pieces edge-to-edge. This will get you a rectangle 60 x 15 cm in size. Cover the edges with a black strip of fabric 1 cm wide. Iron the strip. The “Hawaiian” bag: appliqué Select the quilting mode on your machine. Choose the buttonhole stitch or something similar. Stitch the appliqué with black threads perimeter-wise. Press it with the iron and trim the edges. The “Hawaiian” bag: sewing the bag Prepare the back panel. Sew the patches and zippers to it. On the wrong side, sew the pockets to the zippers. Sew two strips of black fabric, 62x8 cm each, to the top and bottom of the appliqué. Attach the inset with the pockets to the bag and draw the lines for stitching 1 cm apart. Stitch with colored threads as marked. Fold the panel so that it makes a circle and stitch. Pin the handles to the top edge. Sew the border, stitching along the edge on the right side of the bag. Prepare the bottom of the bag. You can sew it from the appliqué leftovers. Sew the bottom to the bag. Add the lining and the bag is ready. Original text by Olga Milovanova
  8. How to turn a pair of jeans into a bag Dig an old pair of jeans or velour trousers out of a closet. Done? Now I’ll tell you how to turn them into a bag. Creating a new item out of something that isn’t fashionable anymore or just something you got tired of is a task for a real craftsman (or craftswoman)! This bag can hold all the necessary paraphernalia: knitting needles, knitting threads or an embroidery kit. Materials A pair of jeans Sewing threads, same color as the stitching on jeans Scissors, pins A piece of cardboard How to turn a pair of jeans into a bag. Cutting For the job, you’ll need one trouser leg together with the waistband. Measure the length of your future bag, starting at the top hem of the waistband, add 8 cm and draw a mark. You’ll need allowance for the bag bottom. Cut one leg only. Rip the leg seam and also where the zipper is sewn on. Remove the zipper. How to turn a pair of jeans into a bag. Assembling Fold the trouser leg with its right side inside, aligning along the side seam. Align the edges, if necessary. Pin the fabric along the side and the bottom seams of the future bag. Sew them together with the straight stitch and whip stitch the edge. Join the stitch lines on the side and the bottom seams. Fold them at an angle. Draw the mark from the corner center. Draw a line perpendicular to the corner, it should equal the width of the bag bottom in length. Stitch with straight stitches along the line. Turn the bag the right side out. Cut out four strips of fabric for the handles. The length and width of the handles should equal their width plus turn-ups. Fold the strips together with their right sides together and stitch along one long side. Press open the seam, fold each seam allowance inside and press. Fold the halves of the handles wrong sides inside and secure with pins. Select the triple stitch on your sewing machine. Stitch along the long sides. Whip stitch the short edges. Pin the handles to the top of the bag. Stitch the handles to the top of the bag, stitching exactly as you did previously. In order to strengthen the bottom of the bag, you can cut a rectangle same size as the bottom out of cardboard. Your bag is ready! Original text by Irina Lisitsa
  9. Patchwork pillow A soft and fuzzy pillow with frayed edges that one can easily create by utilizing scraps from other embroidery projects. The edges will become more frayed with every time the pillow is used. The pattern is basically an ordinary square; the seams will go inside so they won’t need a finish. One cannot have too many pillows, but what if you have more ideas than your flat has free space? The solution is a simple one! Sew several pillows and change their “clothing” often. Pillowcases don’t take much space and can be washed, if necessary. Pattern To create a fluffy pillowcase, take a piece of cardboard and draw a square of side 10 cm plus 2 cm for fraying. Cut out 16 squares from fabrics of various colors. Arrange them as you wish, matching them by color and print. Cut 16 more squares out of white baize or white chintz; these fabrics are easily frayed and suitable for creating the chenille effect. Install the feed dog on your machine and stitch the cutouts together into horizontal bands. If you're going to join multiple layers (4 in our case) with an ordinary foot, lessen the foot pressure first. The details should be joined with their wrong sides facing each other. Pin horizontal bands together, in order to mark the places where the seams meet. Stitch the details together, folding the fray allowance from the seam on both sides before they go under the foot. Having finished stitching, you’ll get the outlined squares on the wrong side, and fray allowance on the right side of the fabric. Rip off the stitching where the fray is. Fray the allowance at a distance of 0.5 cm to the stitching and fluff it. You may leave the last bit to your washing machine :) Several washing cycles will fray your pillowcase alright. The back side of the pillowcase and the button panels: The back side of the pillowcase is comprised of two rectangles 48 by 27 cm. On one side, where the button panels will be, attach a 3 cm wide strip of the adhesive stabilizer. Finish the edges with overlock or with overhand stitch. Fold the edge by 3 cm and stitch with a straight stitch; cut the buttonholes on one of the details. Pin the two pieces of the back side of the pillowcase together with their wrong sides facing each other. Mark the starting point at the distance equal to the fray allowance. Starting from any corner point, sew the parts of the pillow perimeter-wise, rotating it at the corners. Having finished, trim the edges. Cut the fabric reserved for fraying, avoiding the stitching. Sew the buttons, cut the buttonholes and put your pillow into your new pillowcase. Done! Original text by Olga Ionova
  10. Thank you for sharing! Do you mean "thermoflex"? Or just any heat-away stabilizer?
  11. Machine embroidery on terry cloth: the guidelines Every one of us becomes familiar with terry cloth in early childhood: our favorite bathrobes and bath towels are made of it. Terry cloth is most commonly used to produce items for home. Embroidery on terry cloth is a pleasure, for the fabric is stable and doesn't stretch. The loops are, perhaps, the only disadvantage, but if you are familiar with the correct hooping technique, and know how to choose a stabilizer and a design for the particular fabric, you needn’t concern yourself with them. In this article, we’ll cover the main points of the embroidery on terry cloth. One needs to keep in mind that all this information pertains to home embroidery and sewing and embroidery equipment; nevertheless, many of the recommendations will be applicable to commercial embroidery equipment as well. Terry cloth: its composition and properties Terry cloth is an uncut-pile fabric used in the production of towels, beach robes, bath slippers, bed linen for grown-ups and kids, children’s toys, and even bar furnishings. As for its composition, terry cloth is usually made of cotton, linen or, less frequently, bamboo. The fabric absorbs a lot of moisture and doesn’t stretch. These properties, along with the range of uses, make terry cloth very attractive for the embroiderers, both amateur and professional ones. Lately, synthetic fibers are used in the making of the fabric rather often. This lowers its quality a bit, but using it as your main fabric does not affect the result of the embroidery. There are advantages as well. Baby bibs are made of terry cloth that is partly composed of synthetic fibers. They are soft, and the after-effects of breakfast and dinners easily wash off them. Terry cloth differs in weight, thread twist, and loop height. These are the main properties one should pay attention to when mastering the embroidery on terry cloth. The higher the loop, the greater the possibility of its sinking into the fabric or showing through the fill. The thicker the fabric, the more likely you’ll have trouble with hooping it, as such fabric will be more difficult to properly secure. It is possible, but not easily attainable, and besides, do you really need it? Let's proceed. Choosing machine embroidery needles and threads When embroidering on terry cloth, one shouldn’t concern oneself too much with the needles. Ordinary embroidery kind will be just fine. In case there is trouble, use specialty needles listed below. For the embroidery on a loosely spun terry cloth, use ball point needles, such as the ones designed for knitwear. They separate the yarns without cutting them. For the embroidery on a dense terry cloth with high uncut pile and containing a great number of synthetic fibers, use a topstitch needle with a sharp tip. Such a needle easily pierces the material, thus preventing the slip stitching. If you’re going to use metallic threads, use the needle designed specifically for that purpose; metallics are whimsical: when passing through an eye of a wrongly chosen needle, they tend to fray, which at best costs them their luster, and at worst makes them snap a lot. Any threads may be used for the embroidery on terry cloth—cotton, polyester, wool, etc. The main thing that matters is their durability. Rayon and metallic thread are, perhaps, the less washable: they don't get along well with bleachers and other chemicals used in laundry. We’ll probably offer nothing new in the bobbing thread choice department. Use a common bobbin thread (white or black, depending on the design color scheme). Its thickness will depend not so much on the chosen fabric properties as on the whims of your embroidery machine. It has been noted that some machines do not take to a very thin bobbin thread (#200). When embroidering a design on a terry towel, try to choose a bobbin thread of a matching color—in that case, the wrong side will look tidier. Keep in mind, though, that it will make the embroidery thicker. Choosing a stabilizer For the embroidery on terry cloth, the stabilizers listed below will come in handy. When embroidering on terry cloth, the backing is used not only to prevent puckering but also as the main fabric that will be hooped. Tearaway nonadhesive stabilizers are preferable. They can be easily removed without scissors. On the market, you’ll find this kind of stabilizer in two colors, black and white. The color of stabilizer depends on the color of the fabric. It’s better to use black backing with dark fabrics, and a white one with light-colored fabrics. Stabilizers also differ in weight. For the embroidery on terry cloth, use the following stabilizers: 1640, 1650, 1751, 1860. Use stabilizers 1751 and 1860 for the dense terry cloth with high uncut pile (bath towels, bathrobes), and stabilizers 1640 and 1650—for the terry cloth with a low uncut pile (face towels). In addition to the nonadhesive stab, a temporary spray adhesive will be necessary. Filmoplast As a backing, Filmoplast (a tearaway stabilizer with a sticky surface) is the most convenient. It comes in two colors, white and black. You can attach it to the fabric immediately after peeling off the protective paper. More on how to work with these materials in the Hooping methods section. Adhesive stabilizers may be used as well, but in that case, you’ll have to hoop the fabric, and there is no need to hoop the terry cloth. Besides, hooping terry cloth means to make the whole process more complicated. For a topping, we recommend a water-soluble film that prevents the stitches from sinking into the fabric and can be easily removed without washing. Other kinds of topping are of little use for the embroidery on terry cloth. You may use them, but with no avail. Hooping methods Hooping terry cloth is easy. There will be no need to get the fabric tight as a drum or keep an eye on it so that there is not a single wrinkle, as you do with knits. After two or three attempts embroidery on terry cloth will become easy to you. Methods of hooping depend on the kinds of stabilizers recommended for the terry cloth. Materials Nonadhesive stabilizer (backing) Spray adhesive Water-soluble film Hoop the nonadhesive stabilizer. Carefully smooth down the stabilizer and tighten it a bit so that is doesn’t sag. Tighten the screw. Spray the upper side of the stabilizer with a temporary spray adhesive. Place the fabric with its right side facing up on top of the stabilizer. Pin the water-soluble film on top of the fabric. If you have some trouble locating the embroidery area on your machine, use a template. Any template has an embroidery area marked upon it. Materials Filmoplast Water-soluble film Scissors Hoop the Filmoplast. Carefully smooth it down and tighten it a bit so that is doesn’t sag. Tighten the screw. With your scissors, make an incision in the stabilizer’s protective layer. Peel off the protective layer. On top of the stabilizer, place your fabric with its right side facing up. On top of the fabric, place the water-soluble film. Pin it to the fabric. If you have some trouble locating the embroidery area on your machine, use a template. Any template has an embroidery area marked upon it. Choosing machine embroidery designs The vast majority of machine embroidery designs gives one freedom to act. When choosing a design, one should learn to see it from the inside. To understand which fills the creator has used and whether the embroidery will look good on terry cloth. Having tried different embroidery techniques, you’ll come to the conclusion that in the majority of cases a topping should be used for the embroidery on terry cloth. If you’ll stick to this rule, the embroidery on a garment will undoubtedly come out beautifully. In order for you to know your way around the plenitude of machine embroidery designs, we offer the tried-and-true variants with the detailed account of the results. We have lots of logos and other designs in our store. All of the showpieces were embroidered with the help of the 1751 nonadhesive tearaway stabilizer. All stitching designs may be divided into two main kinds: 1) Double run—as a rule, all quilting and Redwork designs are made with simple double running stitches 2) Triple Run—every stitch is repeated three times. The record shows that Triple Run designs come out good with or without the water-soluble film on top. After you’ve removed the stabilizer leftovers and gently passed your hand over the surface, the difference is hardly visible. As regards Double Run, one may state that it is better not to use it while embroidering designs without topping. The difference is clearly pronounced. The picture below shows the same design embroidered with and without the topping. One should not forget that the design embroidered with running stitches on terry cloth may in time sink into the fabric, despite the result being satisfactory right after the embroidery. Therefore, here’s what we propose: embroider stitching designs on thin terry items with low uncut pile (face towels) and refrain from doing that on thick terry items with high uncut pile (bathrobes and bath towels). A highly popular kind of machine embroidery designs are congratulations and inscriptions, and also logos made with satin columns. Monograms are also created with the help of satin columns. This kind of designs is perfect for towels, bathrobes and other items made of terry cloth. To provide you with full information on the subject, we have embroidered terry cloth with satin stitches under different circumstances. In the picture below you can see a monogram embroidered with the topping and without. We’ve tested the design on the least troublesome fabric with the low uncut pile. 1751 nonadhesive stabilizer was used as the backing. When embroidering monograms that consist of satin columns and fills without topping, thread breakage often occurs. The thread is caught in the loops, and that leads to chaffing. Thread breakage is not linked with the needle type or the kind of thread used (we’ve tried metallic, rayon and polyester embroidery threads of various manufacturers). The difficulty was also caused by the fact that the thread didn’t break at once but was chaffed so that the machine continued to embroider for some time after that. When embroidering the same design with the topping, the thread didn’t snap even once, and what’s more, the embroidery ran at a higher speed, with an excellent result. The embroidery without the stabilizer ran at 350 spm, with the stabilizer—at 600 spm! Tatami is one of the most popular fills. Up to 80% of the designs contain objects filled with it. In order to understand how Tatami behaves on terry cloth, we’ve used a simple design with the high-density fill (“Mushrooms”) and a design with the low-density fill (“Flower”). Both designs were embroidered twice, with and without water-soluble stabilizer. We’ve got the following results. The embroidery of the designs that contain Tatami fill without topping leads to trouble. When stitching the design with high-density fill (“Mushrooms”) without the water-soluble stabilizer, the thread twisted and snapped. Terry cloth showed through. When doing this design with the topping, the result was a way better. Though in some places terry cloth is still visible through the fill, you may avoid it by adding an underlay. When embroidering a design with a low-density fill (“Flower”) without the stabilizer, terry cloth showed through the fill, and the thread did not twist but snapped at once. That most often happened on very small stitches. When embroidering the same design with the water-soluble topping, terry cloth didn’t show through (almost), but in some places, where the fill was the least dense, one could see the color of the main fabric. Choosing a design with the Tatami fill, pay attention to whether it has an underlay: it further strengthens the fabric and prevents the terry cloth from showing through during wear. The design we’ve chosen for our test piece didn’t have an underlay and was rather dense. Perfect for terry cloth! The fabric covers the pile that adds some volume to the embroidery. We recommend using a water-soluble stabilizer on top—though without it the thread didn’t break, the loops showed through the satin column. Cross-stitch looked wonderful on a terry towel embroidered with the help of water-soluble stabilizer. One may turn a blind eye to the slight distortion of the stitches after the removal of the stabilizer if one wants a towel embroidered in this technique. We advise against the embroidery without the water-soluble stabilizer because the result is the same as with other embroidery techniques: thread breakage and stitches shifting. Of course, the sky is the limit for a really imaginative embroiderer, but the designs rendered in this technique are not good for terry cloth, especially for a dense high-piled one. If you're going to do cutwork, use the techniques above. You’ll find the guidelines in the section where we discussed satin columns. When choosing a design, pay attention to the width of the satin column. Do not use designs with columns less than 3 mm wide that are trimmed on the side. Taking care of an embroidered item If you want your embroidered item to serve you for many years (OK, months at least), you’ll need to learn how to take care of it. Having finished the embroidery, remove the traces of topping and backing. Gently iron the item in the embroidered area. An important note: it’s better not to use hot pressing and steaming with terry cloth. The loops are flattened, the general appearance of the garment suffers, making it look untidy. You may circumvent this issue by keeping an iron suspended above the fabric and using the steam boost option. Or, you may use a soft underlay—for example, a blanket, or an old terry towel. Items made of terry cloth are highly washable, therefore, if you’ve chosen right threads, no chemicals or high temperatures will do your item any damage. Machine maintenance If you embroider on terry cloth often, especially without any backing, the lint, which is always present, may clutter the shuttle. It is, perhaps, the only problem your embroidery machine may encounter during the embroidery on terry cloth. Keep your shuttle clean and everything will be fine! Happy embroidery! Original text by Irina Lisitsa, Maria Stratan, Lisa Prass
  12. Machine embroidery on linen It is getting difficult for newcomers to find the information they seek among the numerous articles and forum discussions. Therefore, I have compiled all the pieces covering embroidery on linen here. In masterclasses, and also on sewing and embroidery forums, you often see phrases like “sew linen”, “embroidery on linen”, “linen napkins”. No wonder, as linen is a very easy-to-sew fabric. There are heavyweight linen fabrics (grayish brown in color), semi-white, white and dyed. Linens are valued for their durability and wear resistance, and also for their ability to absorb moisture while allowing for good heat and air penetration. Linen fabric varies greatly in appearance, from smooth with a matte finish to heavyweight with a coarse structure. Linen fabric is perfect for tablecloths, table napkins, curtains or bed linen decorated with embroidery. This fabric allows for the natural thermoregulation of the human body, which makes it a perfect material for summer clothes. Types of linen fabric, their uses, and appeal for the embroiderers, will be covered in the future articles. Here I’m talking about how embroidery on linen should be done. Newbie seamstresses and embroiderers should remember that natural (i.e. not containing any synthetic fibers) linen fabric shrinks a lot after washing. One must keep this in mind before cutting out and a pattern and embroidering. In order for the embroidered item to keep its neat look after the first laundering, you need to sanforize the fabric, i.e. to wash it or moisten it with hot steam. After washing, the fabric should be smoothed down while still damp, to save yourself the trouble with ironing out the creases. The rules of embroidery on linen Linen is a very easy fabric to embroider and the least troublesome for embroiderers. Nevertheless, there are several pieces of advice that may come handy for the first-time embroiderers on this highly manageable material. Hooping Linen is hooped in a standard way. The fabric should be smoothed down before being placed in the hoop, with a matching stabilizer glued to its wrong side. Only after that the fabric together with the stabilizer is placed onto the smaller hoop and is covered with a bigger one. Tighten the screw until the fabric is taut to prevent shifting during the embroidery. If the fabric is very thin and you’re afraid to damage it, you may hoop a tearaway stabilizer, and glue the fabric on top. Needles There are no special requirements when choosing needles for embroidery on linen. An ordinary embroidery needle with a sharp tip will be fine. Threads You can use any kind of embroidery threads: polyester, rayon, cotton ones; though it is not advisable to use metallics, there are no rules. If your design calls for metallic threads, try it out. Cotton thread is most often used for the embroidery on linen because its dull surface goes will together with the linen surface. Acrylic threads look interesting: they resemble woolen yarns in appearance. Stabilizer Choosing the right kind of stabilizer for linen depends on the fabric type and the design properties. The density of the stabilizer depends on the density of the design and the fabric weight. If the linen is thin, and the design is dense, you’ll need a tearaway stabilizer with adhesive or an ordinary tearaway. If the linen is dense and plain weave, and the design is a “light” one that only contains simple stitches, you may spare the stabilizer altogether. Too dense designs look bad on thin fabrics, spoiling the effect by reminding one of coarse patches. Soft, if dense, designs should be embroidered on soft, flowing fabrics. If embroidering a dense design on a thin linen fabric cannot be avoided, use a thin bobbin thread: it will make the embroidery a bit lighter. As textured linen is often loosely woven, it is necessary to use a thin water-soluble film on top of it. Embroidery designs In case you digitize your own designs, you’ll need to maintain a certain ratio between the density of the design and the weight of linen on which the design or inscription will be embroidered. If you’re going to embroider on loosely woven linen, it’s better to secure it with an outline prior to the embroidery. If you haven't learned to digitize yet, you are welcome to choose something from our large collection of free embroidery designs. Follow these rules, and the embroidery on linen will be a piece of pie to you. Linen towels, napkins, tablecloths, curtains, bedcovers, and pillowcases will decorate your home. Linen clothes, comfortable to wear, will look beautiful as well, thanks to the machine embroidery. ] Original text by Yelena Kraftwork
  13. A textile etui with cross stitch embroidery (Bargello imitation) Where do you keep your bijou jewelry, beads, memory sticks, buttons, and other knickknacks? Boxes and tins aren’t good–the heart yearns for the beautiful. These cross stitch designs imitate the famous Florentine embroidery known as Bargello. Below I explain how to actually sew and embroider an etui. A textile etui with cross stitch embroidery. Materials Printed cotton fabric Sole-colored cotton fabric Tearaway adhesive stabilizer Upper thread Underthread Scissors Machine embroidery design The sewing order (the image below) A textile etui with cross stitch embroidery. The making process You can buy the design or create it yourself. For those who don't know how, there will be tutorials in future. Prepare the design and working materials. I like doing it before the work starts, thus eliminating the possibility of missing something in the crucial moment. We’ll be using a sole-colored fabric. Attach the adhesive stabilizer to the wrong side. Hoop the fabric together with the stabilizer. Tighten the screw. After that, do the upper and lower threading and attach the hoop. Hit the start button. The embroidery consists of three parts, two rectangular and one square. You need to embroider two rectangular parts and one square part, which will make the basis for your etui. I recommend following the color chart that comes with the design so that to avoid gaudiness. If you’ve decided to create your etui out of felt, you may forego the lining. In the course of embroidery, even cotton fabric becomes thicker, but I decided to leave the stabilizer and to add lining. In order to do that, embroider only the outer stitch on a sole-colored or printed fabric. As it comes last in the embroidery order, you need go to the editing menu of the design and skip the steps you don’t want to embroider. Having embroidered one square and two sides for both inner and outer sides of the etui, cut out the details, leaving 0.5–1 cm for seam allowance. Remove the stabilizer from the seam allowance, it will be superfluous there. Sew first the outer sides, and then inner sides together (see the scheme). Insert the lining into the etui and stitch the two sides together. I sewed by hand, catching the back stitches. You can additionally decorate the item with beads, ribbons, tassels or charms, whichever suits your taste best. In the end, you’ll get a nice textile etui where you can put your sundry. Such an etui may also be used as a box for a small present. Happy embroidery! P.S. Explore other embroidery techniques here! Original text by Mary Stratan Free machine embroidery designs made in this technique can be found here.
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