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  • Embroidery on netting

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    Irina

    Original text by: Marina Belova 

    Today I decided to check whether the high-quality embroidery on netting without using a stabilizer is possible. What kind of stabilizer do you need for the netting? Either water soluble film or other water soluble stabilizer. This means an extra cost, and not a small one; besides, you'll need to wash the embroidery afterward, which also complicates the matters. I also checked whether it was possible to embroider on such a delicate material as netting using any type of needle. I do not have SUK ball point needles, which do not cut through the yarn, only the standard

    R and SES ones. 

    I created a design: 

    embroidery-on-netting-01.jpg.9269db92a52

    Set the most ordinary density, 0.4mm. Put 2 edge runs of understitching under the satin columns. In my opinion, an underlay like this one allows for the satin columns to maintain their shape and work as a backbone, because the stitch has nothing to rely on within the particle, and it therefore creates the ugly ragged edges

    The reason for ragged edges is the large particle mesh size, so that some of the stitches fall first into one particle, then the other, and so on.

    And because the mesh particles are on different levels, the edges become ragged. I saw this method in the Italian embroidery when I was just beginning to embroider on netting. 

    I hooped the netting without the stabilizer. It was the ordinary netting — knit and quite stretchy. There are no difficulties in hooping the netting. I just place it on the inner ring of the hoop and cover it with the outer one, without tugging it in the hoop and other intricacies. The pressure caused by the outer ring is enough to pull it tight. The crucial thing is not to overstretch the netting, in order not to damage the mesh even before starting the embroidery. Otherwise, it will break during the embroidery under the pressure of the stitches pulling it, and very ugly-looking holes will appear along the perimeter. 

    embroidery-on-netting-02.jpg.ec54002cac9

    I chose a standard rayon #40 thread right away. Polyester, in my opinion, is not good for netting. I may be wrong, though. 

    Below is the result of my first attempt, still in the hoop: 

    embroidery-on-netting-03.jpg.54f65de8349

    Numerous perforations along the perimeter and in the corners are visible right away, as well as  the underlay showing in several places: 

    embroidery-on-netting-04.jpg.b2eed85aac2

    embroidery-on-netting-05.jpg.671f6a85983

    Below is the photo of the netting already unhooped but not yet pressed. The pull is not critical and can be corrected by pressing: 

    embroidery-on-netting-06.jpg.5482c5a10bb

    After the pressing: 

    embroidery-on-netting-07.jpg.5962192a988

    In my opinion, there exists a number of reasons for perforations: 

    • High density 
    • No stabilizer 
    • Wrong type of needlepoint 

    As I cannot change the type of needlepoint, I decided to lower the density by 20% (it allowed me to save about 2000 stitches), and in order for the fill to look dense enough, I changed the thread from #40 to #30. Now I'll try to embroider again. 

    embroidery-on-netting-08.jpg.918cb1f0e7c

    The holes along the perimeter and in the corners are still present. Maybe not so many. 

    The pull is not so bad: 

    embroidery-on-netting-09.jpg.92950acfa10

    After pressing the item some of the holes become less visible, but don't disappear completely: 

    embroidery-on-netting-10.jpg.77d4c919b17

    But if you try, you try. Then I decided to embroider on the netting with large square mesh. I hooped it without a stabilizer as well: 

    embroidery-on-netting-11.jpg.91d40086833

    But my attempt to embroider on the netting with a large mesh particle size (on nothing, as one may say) didn't work out. Thread kept breaking, and the embroidery became distorted: 

    embroidery-on-netting-12.jpg.d9c94af16d8

    That's why I decided to put a piece of thick water soluble stabilizer (80 microns) on top. Using thin stabilizer for this purpose is like flogging a dead horse. 

    embroidery-on-netting-13.jpg.6b51841a234

    I instantly realized that I cannot spare the stabilizer this time. This is what I got — like it had been embroidered on the ordinary fabric: 

    embroidery-on-netting-14.jpg.7b073eac7f0

    Almost no puckering: See the photo of this embroidery after washing and pressing below. An excellent sample. I thought it would look much worse: 

    embroidery-on-netting-15.jpg.12db2730d63

    Then I decided to try to embroider on the ordinary netting (like in the first 2 tests), but with the use of the thin water soluble film. But instead of placing it on top for cost reasons, I hooped it together with the netting, as required: 

    embroidery-on-netting-16.jpg.b916003e2c2

    In this case, the advantages of using stabilizer are apparent — the result looks much better than the one without it: neat and tidy, without the underlay showing. I cannot say anything about perforations until I wash off the film: 

    embroidery-on-netting-17.jpg.e365fe6f3d3

    Below is the photo of the already washed embroidery: 

    embroidery-on-netting-18.jpg.d34e26ac712

    The pull is visible, of course, but I'll try to iron it out. The ironing goes smooth and without effort. And the most remarkable thing is the absence of the perforations along the perimeter. 

    embroidery-on-netting-19.jpg.e779235b782

    It means that the needlepoint and high stitch density are not so much the reasons for perforations as using only one layer of thin water soluble stabilizer. Stabilizer is a great invention. Though too high a density is not good for embroidery. To put in a nutshell, my experience convinced me of the futility of not following the standard procedure, even for cost reasons. 

    Here you can read my article about embroidery on tulle netting

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