Jump to content

Beautiful design, Morning owl look amazing.

This embroidery work up perfectly and stitch out nicely. 
Buy Now

Excellent stitches and original style

Stitched out beautifully! Looked amazing and no issues!
Buy Now

Loving birds.. Wonderful designs, stitched out beautifully

Really cute, You love this when you stitched it. Would love more of same designs.
Buy Now

Our designs looks great

Stitched out beautifully! Wonderful decoration!
Buy Now

Adorable design. Stitches out beautifully.

"Thanks so much for this design It's lovely and stitched out beautifully on leather."
Buy Now
  • Articles

    Our website articles

    My embroidery machine doesn’t recognize a design. What am I to do?

    My embroidery machine doesn’t recognize a design. What am I to do?
    Olga approached the embroidery machine. In her hand, there was a brand new 32 Gb USB flash drive that she had bought online specifically for the purpose. Olga drew her breath. She was about to initiate her very first contact with the embroidery machine. Olga stretched her arm in the direction of the USB port on a side panel. The data transfer was about to commence!
    Her swift stylus was flying over the screen, guiding her to the location, which, according to the manual, contained her embroidery designs. These operations were familiar to Olga: after all, she didn’t play Solitaire on her phone during the long winter evenings for nothing. In the end, she was in for a disappointment: the machine found no designs on the USB flash drive. Olga was quite puzzled: what happened to her files and why the machine did not see them?

    The embroidery machine doesn’t recognize a design
    This article deals with the problems almost every machine embroidery novice encounters sooner or later. Gradually, old problems are solved and give way to the new ones; therefore, the information accumulated here will be updated.
    Before loading the designs into your embroidery machine, carefully read the manual to learn how this can be done. Presently, the most popular way of doing that is using a USB flash drive. For this very reason, it is the USB Flash drive that is most troublesome for novice embroiderers.
    In this article, I’ll describe the main reasons for the design load failure, together with the possible solutions.
    The stitch file format is unfamiliar for your embroidery machine
    The embroidery machine manual always lists all compatible file formats/types. The format/extension is identified by the three letters after the dot in the name of the file.
    Every manufacturer has its own format to add to the embroiderer’s troubles.
    Brother — PES Janome — JEF Bernina — ART Pfaff — VIP And so on.
    If you saved your design in the PES format, and your machine can only read JEF and DST, do not expect miracles. Your machine won’t be able to see the design.
    Today, DST is considered a universal stitch format. A lot of manufacturers are aware of the fact, their equipment supporting both DST and the format that is its “native”.
    If your machine can read DST — use it!
    USB flash drive is full
    You have crammed too much information into your USB flash drive. This problem does not occur frequently, but it might, especially if you own a machine of one of the previous generations. Try to format the USB flash drive and then load the designs. If the solution has worked, congratulations! If not, read on.
    You’re using a file format of the newer version 
    I've mentioned the file formats/types just above. You already know that your machine supports PES files, but the machine still fails to recognize them. One possible explanation is that you’re using a newer version of PES than the ones supported by your machine (there are approximately 10 versions of it in total). This trouble usually bothers the owners of the machines that support PES format. What can be done in this case?
    Open the file in any converter software and save it in the older version of the format. Embird automatically saves the files in the latest version of the format, it being compatible with the majority of Brother embroidery machines.
    Machine embroidery design was saved to a wrong folder
    Again, I suggest perusing your embroidery machine manual. It describes the correct sequence, in which the designs should be saved to the USB flash drive, and how to prepare it for the task. Before starting to load any designs, you should format it. Switch on your embroidery machine and insert your USB flash drive into the port. The machine will find and format it, if necessary, creating the system folders. It is in one of these folders that the files should be loaded.
    In case your machine was made after 2014, you’ll most probably never have to face this problem, as the loading process has since been simplified. On the other hand, anything can happen.
    The design is too big
    Any embroidery machine has a maximum embroidery area. It determines the largest size of the design that can be loaded into this particular piece of equipment. If you try to load a 141x139 mm design into the machine that only handles the ones up to 140x140 mm, it won’t be recognized. Open the design in any converter/embroidery editor and check the size. If the design is too large, resize it without stitch recount so as to preserve the decorative fills.
    P.S. Do not mistake the Giga hoop size with the maximum embroidery area!
    Embroidery design is not centered
    Some embroidery formats contain information about the positioning of the design along the X and Y axes. They convey this information to the embroidery machine, and, in case the design is off-center, the machine will fail to recognize it. This problem can be solved by using more complex converters or software specifically designed for the loading of the designs into the embroidery machine. As a rule, they center the designs automatically.
    P.S. This trouble is common for Janome embroidery machines, with their native JEF format. The ultimate fix is provided by Customizer or Embird. Convert the design, ticking the Center in the Hoop box.
    You forgot to load the design to the USB Flash drive
    Yep, it happens. Insert your USB flash drive in the port on your laptop or PC and check.
    Stitch count is too large
    This problem usually occurs on the old machines with small hoops, when one is trying to embroider PhotoStitch designs on them. It means the embroidery file contains more stitches that the machine can process. Solution: divide the file by color into two parts.
    USB flash drive is not compatible with the machine
    A home embroidery machine is a whimsical lady: sometimes the size is all wrong, sometimes it is the face (or, rather, the manufacturer) she takes an immediate dislike to. If nothing of the above has helped, get a new USB flash drive. Which one to choose? I won’t recommend any particular brands. In my experience, two machines of the same manufacturer and of the identical version treated the same USB flash drive differently: one easily recognized all files, the other refused to do it until they were saved in the special design loading software. Furthermore, the machine behaved in a strange way, stitching like there’s no tomorrow, once the USB flash drive was inserted. So, seek your own USB Flash drive, and ye shall find.
    Choose the smaller one. The smaller, the better. 
    If you have any questions or suggestions, please feel free to write us a commentary or start a topic in the community. May only the easy-to-read formats and universally accepted USB flash drives come your way!
    Original text by Lisa Prass

    This beautiful and useful biscornu

    This beautiful and useful biscornu
    Biscornu is a French word, meaning something like “quirky”. You can see these cute thingies in almost every home. Even those who only sew on a button or two from time to time, keep them within reach as something to stick superfluous pins and needles in. A skillfully crafted biscornu may serve as an admirable decoration. But that’s all prattle.
    My point is this: almost all DIY biscornu tutorials concentrate on pincushions for cross-stitch embroidery done by hand, and practically nobody ever mentions the possibility of doing all the sewing and embroidery on a machine. 
    As I already said, the work “biscornu” is of a French origin. It literally means “something uneven”, “with horns or projections”, “irregular”, “funny”, absurd”. For the embroiderers, this word denotes a small polygonal cushion, more or less symmetrical. This skewed little thing may serve as a pincushion, a pendant, a keychain, a scissors fob, and even an ornament. If you add some suitable adornment, you can even hang it on a Christmas tree! Many people would be happy to receive one as a present. Let’s create a biscornu. In this article, I’ll tell you how I made my own.

    To make a biscornu, you’ll need:
    1. A piece of evenly woven fabric (linen or dense cotton). 2. An embroidery machine. 3. Embroidery threads. 4. Optionally, buttons, beads or seed beads, sequins, and rhinestones. 5. Water-soluble or tearaway stabilizer. 6. A design (you may get one from our store https://embroideres.com/). 1. Let’s start by hooping stabilizer and fabric. Tighten the screw and additionally secure the fabric with pins, so that it doesn’t shift during the embroidery.


    2. Load the design into the embroidery machine, attach the hoop and embroider both parts of your biscornu.



    3. Attention! The essential part of biscornu decor is backstitch running along the edge of the design. It will be used for the joining of the two parts.

    4. Both parts of our biscornu are ready. Cut them out with a 1 cm seam allowance.


    5. Before you start assembling the thing, locate the centers of every side of your squares. Mark center points with pins. Join the center of one square with the corner of another. This will give the thing the required skewed shape.
    The assembling process is fun, but it’s also time-consuming, so switch on an audiobook or an episode of your favorite TV series. We’re going to sew the parts of our biscornu by hand.

    6. Pick up the needle and the thread (same as you used for the backstitch), fold it in half so that there is a loop at one end. Move the needle through the first backstitch, then back and through the loop, thus securing the thread with an invisible stitch.

    7. Pull the thread through 2 corner stitches.


    8. Continue in this manner, joining the stitches of square No1 with the stitches of square No2, until your biscornu is stitched up on three sides. You only sew half of the fourth side, leaving an opening for the stuffing.

    9. Snip the inner corners.

    10. Stuff the things with bits of polyester batting or another padding material.



    11. Sew the opening.

    12. Your biscornu is almost ready. Let’s add some finishing touches.


    13. Fold the thread in half, so there is a loop at one end, and thread the two ends through the needle. Find the center of every side of the square, and with a long needle pierce the biscornu through. Then bring the needle back and through the loop.



    14. Pull the thread through the buttons, gathering your biscornu a bit.


    Having looked at my biscornu the following morning, I realized that I didn’t like the buttons. So I replaced them with beads.



    Good luck and easy stitching to you all! Creating biscornu is fun!
    Tutorial supplement. How to create a design for a biscornu
    Loading the design
    1. Open Embird Editor and click on Cross Stitch.
    2. Load the design via Chart Import.

    3. In the window, click on the part of the design and use the Crop tool on it.

    You should get something like this. Press OK. 

    While cropping the image and placement of the marks, use +/- to zoom in or out.
    4. In the next window, place the red marks as shown in the picture below, and click on Align Grid.

    In the window that pops up, you’ll be offered to place a number of crosses between marks 1 and 2, and also between marks 2 and 3. Type in 10 (the number corresponds with the real number of crosses between the marks) and press OK.

    5. See whether the red greed aligns with the chart greed. If yes, press OK. If the two grids don't align, click on Undo Alignment and change the placement of the three marks.

    A 100% alignment is not necessary.
    The loading image FAQ 
    How to activate the Crop button? 
    Open your image (step 3), and immediately after that place the cursor in the spot A. Holding down your left mouse button, move the cursor to the spot B. Release the button. Now the Crop tool is active.

    Why did you place the red marks in those places, and not in the corners? Why 10 crosses?
    You can place the red marks whenever you want them, and set any spacing you like (even if it is only 1 cross). Play around with the options and see what works best for you.
    Drawing the pattern
    1. First of all, let’s choose the color. Click on the Eye Dropper tool on the toolbar. Left-click on the wine-red color. It will appear in your color chart.

    2. Click on Line and create the objects 1, 2 and 3.

    3. Now, click on Pencil, and create the objects 4, 5 and 6.

    Play with these tools a bit. Note the difference between them. Decide for yourself, in which cases you would prefer Line, and when Pencil would be better.
    4. Click on the Eye dropper again, but this time choose grey. 
    5. Now click on Line and draw the objects 1,2 and 3.

    6. Click on Pencil and draw the rest of the objects.

    We’re done with drawing. Let’s proceed to the last part, copying and pasting.
    Copying and placement
    Before copying and placing the symmetrical pattern, you’ll need to change the size of your work area. 
    1. Go to the Options menu and click on Preferences.

    2. Check the Keep Aspect Ratio box and change the value to:

    3. Your work area now looks like this:

    4. Click on Marquee (vertical toolbar) and select your pattern. Press Auto Repeat.

    5. In the opening window, set the following values: right pointing arrow (1), mirror horizontally (2), spacing -1 (3). Press OK.

    6. Using the Marquee tool (step 4), select the pattern and click on Auto Repeat.

    7. The window will pop up, where you set the following values: The arrow pointing down (1), mirror vertically (2), spacing -1 (3). 

    Your pattern is ready. Save the file in the necessary format.
    For those who don’t want to bother with all that, here you can download the design.

    Original text by Irina Lisitsa, tutorial supplement by Lisa Prass

    Cherry tree blossom: revamping old roller shades

    Cherry tree blossom: revamping old roller shades
    Roller shades have become a customary part of our homes. Thanks to the huge variety of textures and sizes, they can be easily adjusted to fit into our interior environments. And, should you make some changes to your interior design (I did), you can easily transform them, let’s say, by adding an oriental touch – a cherry tree blossom to remind you of the first rays of sunshine. For this tutorial, I’ll be using a design found on the Internet. I’ll alter it a bit, then cut it out using ScanNCut, and after that add some finishing touches with the help of a stencil.
    Materials
    Two pieces of roller shade material to fit your windows + fittings or two ready roller shades 30 cm wide. ScanNCut machine. Standard mat, 30 or 60 cm long, depending on the size of your design. A piece of paper large enough to fit your stencil. White craft glue. Fabric paints (I used acrylic). A sponge (or a paintbrush). A design. First, I made some changes to the picture I found (a cherry tree branch) in Canvas Workspace (the former ScаnNCutCanvas). You’ll need 2 files, one for making a stencil, and another one for cutting the roller shade.
    Open the image in your Canvas Workspace, go to Image Tracing, and press Color–Preview–OK.


    Select all objects, right-click and press Group. Save the result to a USB flash drive. This is our file No1. We’ll use it to create a stencil.

    Now, we proceed to the pattern for the shade. We’ll only need those objects that are going to be cut. Select all stems on the image and press Delete. Only the flowers should be left. This is our file No2. We’ll use it to cut the roller shade.


    Select all objects, right-click and press Group. Save the result to USB flash drive.

    (In order for the patterns on the shades to differ slightly, I deleted several flowers on the bottom and saved them into a separate file).
    Let’s prepare our roller shades.
    I cut 30 cm from each piece of fabric, thus getting two shades 30 cm wide (because my cutting mat is 30 cm wide). Metallic tubes on top and bottom of every shade should be filed with a mill file. Slide the bottom hem of the shade from the metal tube and detach the cardboard strip.


    Or, you may use a couple of existing roller shades, 30 cm wide each. In that case, you’ll only need to de-tube them and remove the strips.
    Secure the bottom edge of the shade to the mat and do the test cut. (Blade length 5, pressure 4. Other values may be used, depending on the material your roller shade is made of).

    Open file No2 in ScanNCut. Now let’s alter the design a bit: first invert it, then check the size and placement. Cut out your pattern and unpeel it from the mat.



    Repeat with the second roller shade. Change the size and placement of the design and cut.


    Apply some white craft glue to the wrong side of the narrow parts to give them additional strength. After the glue dries, it won’t be visible.

    Cut out a paper stencil, using file No1. Blade length 4, pressure 0.


    Align your stencil with the pattern on the shade and secure it with pieces of an adhesive tape.
    To be on the safe side, I also taped over the flowers, to prevent the paint from getting there. Squeeze the paint onto the paper, dip your paintbrush/sponge into it and start tapping on the openings in the stencil.




    It will take approximately 5 hours for the paint to dry. After that, take away your stencil, attach strips of cardboard to the bottom parts of the shades and insert metallic tubes.



    Attach fittings to the narrow shades and put them up.

    Hopefully, this will add a bit of sunshine into your winter homes.


    The idea for the decoration in this tutorial was found on the Internet.
    Original text by Maria Bespalova

    Sewing three-dimensional letters of the alphabet

    Sewing three-dimensional letters of the alphabet
    Three-dimensional letters are very easy to make if you have a sewing/sewing and embroidery machine. It requires very few expendables, a bit of your free time and a good mood.
    Sewing three-dimensional letters of the alphabet. Materials
    For the tutorial, I purchased a set of cute girly fabrics. It contained seven different patterns, of which I chose three, for a five-letter name. Besides fabrics, you’ll require threads, hand sewing and embroidery needles, soft padding material (polyester batting, Holofiber), and, naturally, the machine.


    Sewing three-dimensional letters of the alphabet. Embroidery
    The making of the embroidery design is a piece of cake even for beginners. Choose a font or create your own in your PE Design. Load the design into your embroidery machine, and hoop the stabilizer. Place your padding material (let’s say, 100 g/m2 polyester batting) on top of it. Next, place the outer fabric with its right side up.


    Hit the start button. While the machine is running, hold on to your fabric, pulling it just a little. You can also attach an eyelet for hanging.


    Finish the embroidery.
    Two parts of a letter can be embroidered in one go in a 200x300 mm hoop. In order to do that, copy your design and invert it, using your machine’s editor.


    Trim the embroidered letters around the contours with a 0.7 cm seam allowance. Now stitch them together as shown in this article (coming tomorrow!). Leave a 5 cm long opening for the stuffing.


    Having put your padding inside, sew the opening. You may ask the kids to help you, they’ll probably jump at the idea.

    This is the set of letters I made for a newborn baby. Many happy creations to you!

    Original text by Irina Lisitsa

     

    Sewing essentials. Double stitched seam

    Sewing essentials: Double stitched seam
    Double stitched seam is one of the basic seams that are used for sewing shirts, swing blouses, jeans, sport trousers, bed linen, etc. If you only have a sewing machine and no overlocker, no need to worry about it. Thanks to the double stitched seam, both right and wrong sides of your garment will look perfect.
    Ready? Let's go!
    Before you start working on the actual garment, find some leftover pieces of fabric and do some tests. In this tutorial, I’ll be using a piece of middle-weight fabric, but keep in mind that double seam is also suitable for delicate fraying fabrics as cheesecloth and batiste. I strongly advise against using it on highly stretchable knits, unless you’re an owner of a coverstitch machine with adjustable differential feed.
    Creating double stitched seam
    Far left needle position Standard Brother sewing machine presser foot Pink upper thread and turquoise lower thread Blue-colored wavy line on the right side of the fabric Put the fabric pieces with their wrong sides together. Stitch at a distance of 0.5 cm from the edge. To get a nice straight row of stitches, use the scale on your standard presser foot.


    Keep the width steady by using a seam guide on your throat plate.


    In the photo, you can see the two details stitched together from the wrong side. Press the seam allowance with an iron. Put the details with their wrong sides together, circumventing the protruding seam allowance. Stitch at a distance of 0.7 cm from the edge.
    You can choose a different value if you want. Play with the stitch width, do several test pieces and decide which one works best in your case. For the purposes of this tutorial, I set the values as follows: ready double stitch width 0.7 cm, seam allowance 1 cm (0.3 cm will be “lost” in turndowns).


    As a result, the wrong side of your garment will look like the one in the photo below. The edge of the fabric is hidden inside the seam allowance. After that, not a single loose thread will escape.


    Press the seam allowance with an iron. Right (the photo above) and wrong sides (the photo below).

    >
    Now all that’s left is to add a finish. It’ll kill two birds with one stone: secure the seam allowance on the wrong side and serve as a decoration. You may add one or two lines of decorative stitches.
    If you chose the latter of the two options, place the fabric under the foot and stitch the first line of decorative stitches at a distance of 0.25 cm from the joining stitchline. For the sake of convenience, you may draw a line with an erasable pen on the foot itself (see the photo).

    Or, you may skip this and proceed to the second line of decorative stitches.

    It will be just as durable, but on the right side, there will be less decoration.
    The second line of decorative stitches should lie at a distance of 0.7 cm from the joining stitchline. Use the scale on your presser foot while doing that.


    All done! You now have two parallel lines of stitches on the right side, and three on the wrong side.





    Original text by Irina Lisitsa

    Placemats with machine embroidery

    Placemats with machine embroidery
    Preparing for a holiday, one must take a number of things into account, such as buying or creating presents, inviting guests, home decoration, etc. To make your table look inviting, you’ll only need several pieces of fabric and a sewing and embroidery machine. Sew the placemats and decorate them with machine embroidery that your guests will love!
    Placemats with machine embroidery. Materials
    Outer fabric Inner fabric Between-lay Tearaway adhesive stabilizer Sewing and embroidery threads Placemats with machine embroidery. Preparations
    Cut the 48x38 cm rectangles out of the outer and inner fabrics, as well as the between-lay material. Put them together in this way: first goes the inner fabric, right side down, then the between-lay, and the upper fabric with its right side up on top of it all. Pin the layers together and draw the straight or diagonal lines with the help of a long ruler.



    Using the walking foot with a guide, stitch the layers together along the lines you’ve just drawn. Start with the centerline, and gradually work your way to the sides.



    Placemats with machine embroidery. Embroidery
    Choose a design from the machine’s memory or download one from our store. When you use designs from your machine’s memory (letters, for example), you can change their size up to 20% directly in the machine. If you are in a mood for creativity, and the machine’s capabilities are not enough, you might want to use PE Design.

    Stick a tearaway adhesive to the wrong side of your fabric. Hoop and run the embroidery. 


    After the machine has finished stitching, unhoop the fabric, and remove the stabilizer leftovers. Cut out the pockets or decorations for your placemat. 


    In order to create a pocket for the cutlery, stitch on the seam allowance. Insert a cardboard pattern and gather the thread. Press the cutout with an iron. 


    Placemats with machine embroidery. Assembling
    The pockets can be sewn on with a straight stitch on the sewing machine or by hand (blind stitch). For the neat edges, use the edge stitch foot.


    The details may be attached by a zigzag stitch or any of the decorative stitches.

    Bias binding is good for the edges. You can cut it from the main fabric or you may use the companion fabric to make your bias binding a part of the decoration. To attach it to the placemat, use the edge stitch foot.


    Placemats are easy to sew, and there is an unlimited number of decorations.


    Original text by Irina Lisitsa

    Heart-shaped scissors holder with embroidery

    Heart-shaped scissors holder with embroidery
    Want to learn how the simplest design, a couple of stitches and tools make a cute item? This tutorial contains a bare minimum of technique, a couple of tips and a step-by-step guide to creating an original scissors holder shaped like a heart. A gift like this will warm the heart of any crafter. And, if you have a really creative sewer/embroiderer for a friend, who owns lots of scissors, you may even give it to them instead of a Valentine. 
    Heart-shaped scissors holder with embroidery. Materials:
    Sole-colored fabric (non-stretchy) Felt (thick) Tearaway adhesive stabilizer Upper embroidery threads Lower embroidery threads Scissors Machine embroidery design
    Heart-shaped scissors holder with embroidery. The making process
    Prepare the necessary materials. Load the design into your embroidery machine and attach the sole-colored fabric to the stabilizer. This will be our front (embroidered) panel.
    I usually prefer a tearaway adhesive, but in this case, a nonadhesive tearaway will do just as good, as will a cutaway stabilizer. If you use the last one, you may leave it in place after embroidery; in that case, you’ll have a strengthened front panel.
    If you’ll choose to make an entire holder out of thick felt, you may spare the stabilizer altogether.
    The next step is to attach the hoop to the embroidery machine and start the embroidery. Home embroidery machine will make stops for a thread change.

    Once the embroidery is finished, unhoop. Leave the stabilizer in place, if you wish.
    On the embroidered fabric, draw a triangle in such a way that the design fits exactly in its center. Keep in mind the size of the scissors, for which the holder is intended. Before cutting the triangle out, decide whether you will fold the edges or not. If yes, don't forget to leave some fabric for seam allowance (or fraying, as shown in this tutorial).

    Pick up a sheet of paper, draw the triangle and then add two half-circles to transform it into a heart. You may skip this part and draw directly on felt. It is easier to draw on paper, so, if you're not an artist (I’m not), do as I did. 

    Press the paper template to the felt and cut the back panel of your holder.

    You’re almost done. The fabric I chose for my front panel frays a bit. I decided not to fold the sides in order to hide the edges. In order to prevent the upper edge from fraying more than it is necessary for decoration, I add a decorative stitch at some distance from it. Now I join the sides with the back panel. I use threads of the same color as the felt.

    One last thing: I pierce a hole on the side and tie the ribbon in a bow. A piercer came with my sewing and embroidery machine. If you do not own one, use a substitute.

    Voila! Your scissors holder is ready!
    Original text by Mary Stratan
    Pick the design you like from our store! https://embroideres.com/ 

    Sewing in the hoop: An embroidered bag in the shape of a house

    Sewing in the hoop: An embroidered bag in the shape of a house
    An embroidered bag in the shape of a house
    For this job, you’ll need:
    A hoop, size 20 x 30 cm A design, size 20 x 30 cm A piece of yellow fabric, size 20 x 24 cm Two pieces of red fabric, size 20 x 8 cm each Two strips of fabric for the eyelets, size 7 x 3 cm each A piece of lining, size 32 x 18 cm Colored embroidery threads High-loft interfacing material (adhesive) Tearaway stabilizer A zipper If you’re going to use a Brother V machine, you’ll need to have the Premium Pack I installed to be able to enlarge the embroidery field to 20 x 30 cm.
    An embroidered bag in the shape of a house. Embroidery
    With an iron, fuse the high-loft interfacing material to the yellow fabric. Place a piece of tearaway stabilizer under the fabric and hoop them together. Make sure that the center of the yellow piece corresponds to the center of the hoop.


    Begin the embroidery. The machine will stitch the outline and make a stop.

    Don’t unhoop; place the red pieces on top. Fuse them to the high-loft interfacing material with an iron, fix the edges with glue and continue embroidery.


    Trim the extra fabric from the scallops and embroider the rest of the design.



    An embroidered bag in the shape of a house. Sewing
    Iron the embroidery and cut along the outline.
    Now create the eyelets. Fold the 14 3 cm strip of fabric in two, stitch along the longer side and turn the right side out. The ready eyelets should measure 7 x 2 cm.


    Fold the strip in two and stitch it to the right side of the fabric with a straight stitch, as shown in the picture.

    Sew the zipper to the upper part of the bag.


    Stitch the lining along the zipper. Fold the bag, right side inside, align the sides. Stitch the sides. Leave 5 cm of the lining for the turning out.


    Fold the lower corners inside and stitch across, 2 cm from the edge.

    Turn the right side out and iron. Drag a cord or a band through the eyelets. It will serve as a handle.



    Original text by Olga Milovanova

    An embroidered tea set for two

    An embroidered tea set for two
    Let’s create a cozy atmosphere and sew a tea set. Our set will include two napkins and two teacup sleeves – for you and for your significant other. If you own an embroidery/sewing and embroidery machine, this will be easy for you. A tea set for two might also make a great present for your Valentine. Are you with us? Let’s go!
    For this job, you’ll need:
    A sewing and embroidery machine A piece of linen fabric size 50 x 50 cm Machine embroidery threads Sewing threads Machine embroidery designs An embroidered tea set for two. Embroidery techniques
    Download the designs.
    Design sizes:
    For a napkin: width 76, height 105 mm. For a sleeve: width 164, height 76 mm. Load the designs into your embroidery machine. From the wrong side, press the tearaway stabilizer to the fabric with an iron, then hoop the whole thing. Check the design placement and hit the start button.


    After the machine has stopped, unhoop the fabric, tear away the stabilizer from the wrong side and press the embroidery with an iron.
    Cutting and sewing
    Cut the panels. For a napkin: 45 x 26 cm. For a sleeve: 2 details, 18 x 26 cm each (size of the ready sleeve: 8.5 x24.5 cm). 


    Sleeve: fuse a piece of high-loft interfacing material size 8.5 x 25 cm to the wrong side of your fabric and iron it (do not touch the seam allowance).
    Take a small piece of fabric and fold it on the bias so that it is about 8 cm long. Sew in into an eyelet and pin to the right side of your fabric, 5 cm from the edge. (You may use a piece of round elastic instead).


    Fold the fabric along its long side with the right side inside, pin and stitch on three sides, 7 mm from the edge. Don't forget to leave an opening for turning out. Cut the corners.


    Turn the right side out and iron. Try it on a cup and sew on a button.


    Napkin: trim the edges, pull out threads along the perimeter, 0.5 cm from the edge. All done!


    Original text by Olga Milovanova
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...