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    Clothes repair: How to move a zipper to another side

    Clothes repair: How to move a zipper to another side
    While sewing a pair of shorts or pants, a beginner tailor might easily, in the heat of work, make a mistake of attaching a zipper on the ‘men’s’ side instead of ‘women’s’ and vice versa. These shorts with a zipper on the ‘women’s’ came to me as the result of a young man’s hasty shopping. An unusual order resulted in a tutorial, which I’m now sharing with you.
    How to move a zipper to another side. Materials
    Shorts A sewing machine A zipper foot A spare zipper (if necessary) Threads and needles, scissors, a seam ripper How to move a zipper to another side. The work order
    This is how the shorts looked before I started working on them. I want to call your attention to the waistband; we’ll be making changes to it as well.


    A ready garment is not that different from a semi-finished one when it comes to preparation. You’ll need to get rid of unnecessary stitches and deconstruct the unit. Pick up a seam ripper and carefully deconstruct the whole thing. Don’t touch the cording or edge finishing made with a serger.


    Let’s proceed to the zipper. On the fly front guard there already is a line that will serve you as a guide for sewing a zipper. Baste the zipper to the wrong side. Install a zipper foot on your machine and stitch the zipper tape.
    Baste or pin the front fly extension to the other side of the tape and stitch. In order to prevent the pieces from getting nipped in the course of sewing, you may fold them in half and pin.



    On the right side of the garment, mark where the topstitch will run. Align the edge of the zipper unit with the edge of your garment. Stitch the parts together.


    Fold the zipper unit to the wrong side and topstitch along the edge from the lower to the upper edge. Edge stitch foot is your little helper here.


    Set the values according to your own taste. You can easily determine the stitch length by simply measuring it with a ruler on a ready item. Different embroidery machine models have different stitch settings; there is a lot written about them in the manual. It often has tables that help to quickly choose the right stitch and the values.


    Topstitch the fly guard along the drafted line. After that, join the free edge of the zipper tape and the garment.


    This is how my shorts looked like after I relocated the zipper. Stitch the lower part of the front seam under the topstitching line to the center point where the seams meet, one or two times. Join the parts with their wrong sides together, and topstitch on the right side (optional).


    All that’s left is to sew a waistband. In order to do it evenly, join the waistband and the garment, beginning at the center back. Evenly distribute the waistband, paying attention to where the side seams meet. If there are the belt loops, use them as guides. Stitch the waistband to the garment, then fold the waistband lining to the wrong side and topstitch along the lower edge or do the shadow seam. This will help to lower the burden on the first seam, and also to join the inner side of the waistband to the outer one.


    Sew the buttons back on.
    Compare the two photos. On the left are the shorts how they came to me, on the right — the shorts after I repaired them. This tutorial uses an unusual way of sewing a zipper.


    In the clothing repair shop where I saw it first, it was called ‘the quick one’ and was intended for speedy clothes repair.
    Original text by Irina Lisitsa

    Wardrobe revamping: a dress with ‘bat’ sleeves

    Wardrobe revamping: a dress with ‘bat’ sleeves
    A serger machine should not remain idle. Let’s use it to freshen up your old clothes and sew a knitted dress with ‘bat’ sleeves. In this tutorial, I’ll be employing simple dress sewing techniques: doing a blind hem on the serger and also attaching neckline facing. You’ll enjoy the work and the new dress will uplift your mood.
    To do this job, you’ll need:
    Fabric Sewing threads Serger and invisible stitch foot Adhesive sewing interfacing material for knits T-shirt or blouse pattern with 'bat' sleeves In order to buy the right amount of fabric, you need to know the length of your dress. Place the measuring tape at your shoulder and go all the way down (make sure that it is straight). Measure the desired length. The length of the piece of fabric will equal two lengths of the dress plus 20 cm.
    Wash or soak the fabric in hot water for approximately an hour. You need to do this in order for the fabric to shrink before you cut it. Skipping this step, you risk getting a smaller dress after the first washing.
    A dress with ‘bat’ sleeves. Cutting
    Fold the fabric in half, with its right side inside. Fold the T-shirt in half and align its fold line with the fold line of the fabric. Trace the outline with a piece of chalk.
    If you don’t have a blouse with ‘bat’ sleeves in your wardrobe, use a close-fitting T-shirt to find the key points, or a sewing pattern, changing the values to suit you.



    Having traced the outline and taking all basic measurements — chest, waist, and hips circumference — cut the back part with a 0.7 cm seam allowance. Place the cutout on top of the second piece of fabric, folded in half, and cut out the front part, making the front neckline approximately 3 cm deeper.



    Out of the remaining fabric, cut out a strip for the loops that will keep the belt in place. Sew, turn it right side out and press.


    Place the front and the back parts together, their right sides together. Position the belt loops at a waistline, over the side seams. Pin the side and shoulder edges, stitch the parts together on your serger with a 4-thread stitch. Attach the belt loops to the side seams.


    A dress with ‘bat’ sleeves. Facing
    Transfer the back and front neckline to the tracing paper, move down 3–4 cm down and cut out your future facing pattern. Glue the sewing interfacing material for knits to the piece of fabric. Cut out your front and back facing, together with seam allowance.



    Stitch the short sides together. Baste and finish the edge with a 3-thread stitch on your serger. Place the facing and the neckhole to each other, right sides together, and pin.



    Stitch with your serger, pin, and press lightly. Sew the facing to the neckline with invisible stitches.



    A dress with ‘bat’ sleeves. Hemming
    Mark the hemline on the right side of the fabric. Do the blind hem on your overlocker. You’ll know how to do that from our Blind hem with your serger tutorial (Link will be here in the future).



    Cut out the belt 11 cm wide (length should be equal to your waist circumference plus 3 cm). Attach the hooks, folding seam allowance inside.



    Your dress is now ready! Get your hair done, add some bijou and show off your new garment!

    Original text by Irina Lisitsa
    P.S. Sewing pattern

    Decorating a kitchen: an embroidered pot holder

    Decorating a kitchen: an embroidered pot holder
    Not only will an embroidered pot holder protect your hands from scalding but also make your kitchen look lovely. In the course of our collaborative projects, the participants are required to embroider any of the kitchen or table textiles of their choice. No need to do something complex, as one can always make a pot holder.
    An embroidered pot holder. Materials
    Sole-colored cotton, 2 pieces Printed cotton, 1 piece Tearaway adhesive stabilizer Upper thread Underthread Scissors Cotton lace Padding material
    An embroidered pot holder. The making process
    I used two sole-colored pieces of different fabrics for the embroidered part and for the back part of my pot holder, with a binding. I could have cut the front and the back parts out of the same fabric, as it would look more natural if the whole thing was white. But I didn't have the necessary amount of white fabric, and therefore, I supplemented it with beige one.
    Let’s embroider a design first. Stabilize your fabric and hoop it. Select your threads (I do it beforehand, and sort them in the order of sewing), and start the embroidery. While the machine is going, you can make yourself a cup of coffee, pausing occasionally to change the thread.

    Once the embroidery is ready, unhoop the fabric and do the cutting. Natural fabrics, being heat-resistant, are preferable. My pot holder was a simple square one, with no bells and whistles. As for the batting, felt, wadding or drape cloth are most common, but if you don't have any of those, and you only plan to use the pot holder for the decoration, you may use polyester batting instead.
    Attention! Polyester batting is highly thermal conductive and has a low melting threshold.
    You’ll need to cut two square pieces, one sole-colored and one printed. Don’t use vividly colored prints; the fabric should not distract attention from the embroidery. It would be better if one of the colors of the fabric will match one of the main colors in your design.
    Out of the embroidered piece, cut out a pocket with seam allowance, so that the design is right at the center. Lay a piece of lace on top of it, facing into the right corner. Cut with allowance, in case it shifts during sewing, and you don’t want to rip it off.
    Prepare the binding. It is usually cut on a bias, but if you don’t have enough material, you may use a simple rectangle instead.
    First, I stitched the batting and the beige fabric for the back part of my pot holder. These are simple square pieces, no difficulties here. You may mark them for better alignment, but I did it by eye, and it came out fine.

    Then I stitched the pocket and the lace to the front part. I ironed out the edging so that it would sew easier, pinned the corners and carefully stitched along the edge. Now be very careful and make sure that the stitch goes along the top edge of the binding in one go and doesn’t slide down the lower one. If you set your machine at a low speed and keep steadying it along the way, it will come out fine. Be extra careful at the corners (alas, I didn’t manage to achieve perfection here).

    I don’t like basting and step-by-step stuff, all this dilly-dallying just doesn’t agree with me. But if you prefer to work that way, you can baste the thing first.
    Cut your binding a little longer than the perimeter of the pot holder; we’ll make the surplus into an eyelet. Your pot holder is ready! You may insert your favorite recipe into the pocket.


    Original text by Mary Stratan

    Clothes repair: Changing a zipper in a jacket

    Clothes repair: Changing a zipper in a jacket
    If a zipper in your favorite jacket stopped working, don’t despair! Don’t be haste to chuck it. With a sewing machine at home, you’ll be able to repair it for a very small price. In this tutorial, I’ll show you how to change a zipper with a cord in a kids' jacket. The method used here is identical to the one in this article (link coming soon!).
    Changing a zipper in a jacket. Preparations
    To prepare for the job, you need to rip the seams open to remove the broken zipper, to buy a new one, preferably of the same length. Clear away the thread remnants.


    Close to the teeth of the new zipper, baste the cord.


    Changing a zipper in a jacket. Sewing
    To sew a zipper, you’ll need two pressure feet: a standard zipper foot and a cording foot. Prepare your machine for cording. Choose a straight stitch, with the needle in the center position, and set the stitch length at 3 mm.


    Place the zipper with the cording under the foot and stitch carefully.



    After that, baste the zipper to the jacket, and fold the cording to the wrong side.


    Likewise, fold the upper edge of the jacket to the wrong side and baste. Make sure that the two halves of the cording are equal in length. Now install the zipper foot, and position the needle at the right or at the left.
    The side depends on which side of the zipper you’re going to attach first.


    Sew the zipper to the jacket.
    The work is done, and the jacket gets the second life.

    Original text by Irina Lisitsa

    Circular embroidery attachment

    Circular embroidery attachment
    Being an owner of a wonderful Brother Innov-is 950 sewing and embroidery machine, I constantly seek to add functionality to it. I’m able to do it with various accessories and attachments. Today, I want to tell you about a circular embroidery attachment which is not listed among the Brother machines accessories. I bought it on a trial basis, without being sure whether it is compatible or not. Now I am able to state with confidence that it is indeed compatible not only with my machine but also the whole number of other models.

    Circular embroidery attachment. Materials
    Dense fabric Circular embroidery attachment Sewing threads Scissors Embroidery or sewing and embroidery machine
    Circular embroidery attachment. How to install and sew
    I covered all the key aspects in my video. I want to additionally stress several, in my opinion, important points:
    During the attachment installation, the long lever should hover over the screw that holds the needle in place. Only in that position the attachment will move in the proper way, forming a circular pattern.
     The upper thread should be above the attachment prior to the beginning of the embroidery. Make sure that is doesn’t get underneath. The lower side of the attachment is covered with a thick non-slippery material that allows moving the fabric in the right direction. If the thread gets under the attachment, the fabric will shift, and the embroidery will come out warped.
      If you’re going to use thin fabric, make sure to strengthen it with a machine embroidery stabilizer prior to the embroidery. A tearaway adhesive works fine, as it is easy to remove after the work is done.
     You may choose from a multitude of decorative stitches (including zigzag) in your circular embroidery. Before starting on the real thing, do not forget to do a test sew first.
     Turn off the feed dog before starting the embroidery. The attachment itself will feed the fabric.
    With its help, you will be able to embroider circular designs of three different sizes: large, medium-sized and small. To change the size, you’ll need to loosen the screw, move the attachment to the “plus” or “minus” side and tighten the screw again.

    Double needles, too, may be used for circular embroidery.
    The attachment is also compatible with such Brother machines as: Boutique 27, Comfort 10, Comfort 15, Comfort 25, Comfort 25A, Comfort 35A, LS2125, LS3125, Prestige 100, Prestige 200, Prestige 300, Prestige 50, Universal 17, Universal 25, Universal 27S, Universal 37S, XL-2130, XL-2140, XL-2240, XL-2250, XL-2600, XL-3500, XL-2120, XL-2220, XL-2230, XL-5050, XL-5060, XL-5070, XL-5500, XL-5600, XL-5700.
    Original text by Mary Stratan

    Machine embroidery with subsequent coloring

    Machine embroidery with subsequent coloring
    Today, I want to share a very interesting project that involves machine embroidery and coloring. A ready-made child raincoat was used. In the course of making, a lining had to be ripped off, and sewn back again after the project was completed. I needed to do that to keep the inner side of the garment neat and clean. The idea was to embroider an outline and then to paint the inner areas with different colors, using color textile markers made specifically for such purposes.
    For this project, I needed:
    A child’s raincoat Tearaway stabilizer Black embroidery threads and lower (bobbin) thread Color textile markers (permanent) Brother embroidery or sewing and embroidery machine   Design creation and editing software Creation of the design
    First, I created an embroidery design. Suitable vector images were found on the Internet. You can use bitmap images, too, if you like, but they usually take much more time and effort. Several fragments of the embroidery were thus converted and later aligned with each other during the embroidery.

    Embroidery
    In this particular case, it was convenient to use the largest hoop available. As the embroidery was conducted on Brother Innov-is V7 machine, it was practicable to use a 300 x180 cm frame that comes with the machine – it helped to reduce the number of rehoopings.
    A rightly chosen stabilizer is a must if you want to get a high-quality embroidery. I used Filmoplast.

    In order for the outline to look sharp and distinguished, it was digitized as a double stitch.

    After the embroidery was completed, I removed all stabilizer leftovers from the wrong side.

    The embroidery ran along the lower hem of the garment, and also around the sleeves (which were, too, unseamed in advance). The embroidery took quite a lengthy amount of time, but the result was worth it! The raincoat looks very original and exquisite!

    Let’s proceed to the coloring.
    For the last step, we required permanent textile markers. A happy owner of the future raincoat was invited to join the process; she readily employed all her skills to her heart’s content.



    A few hours of pleasant collaboration – and an exclusive raincoat is ready! It’s certainly one and only! 

    Original text and sewing project by Olga Milovanova

     

    Sewing tutorial: an eco friendly bag with a Rooster

    Sewing tutorial: an eco-friendly bag with a Rooster
    This is another one of the tutorials presented at the Mlyn exhibition in Minsk. In this tutorial, I’ll show you how to sew an eco-friendly bag with a reverse appliqué (Rooster). And not just a simple appliqué, but a quilted one, too.

    Sewing a Rooster eco bag. Materials:
    Unbleached linen fabric For the bag: 2 pieces, 30 x 35 cm each For the handles: 2 pieces, 7 x 60 cm each (or 1 piece, 7 x120 cm) For the lining: 2 pieces of calico, 32 x 30 cm plus 1 piece, 18 x 18 cm – for the pocket Colored strips of fabric 24 cm long for the appliqué (the width may vary: 2.5 or 3 or 3.5 cm) Sewing threads, erasable pen, zigzag scissors. Sewing a Rooster eco-friendly bag. The working process:
    For the decoration, we’ll be using a raw edge reverse appliqué. You can use any outline drawing of a rooster size 20 x 20 cm. Print it and cut out the pattern.
    Stitch the strips of fabric together to make a quilt: one after the other, alternating between different colors, until you get a piece 24 x 24 cm in size.


    Place the front part of your bag on top of the quilt and secure it with pins.

    Trace the design onto the fabric with an erasable pen. Make sure that the design isn’t bigger than the quilted area. Sew along the outline with a decorative stitch.



    Using your zigzag scissors, make a hole in the outlined area and cut it close to the outline.


    Use the resulting piece to create your eco-bag.

    Original text by Olga Milovanova

    Freestyle backpack purse: a step-by-step guide.

    A guide to sewing a freestyle backpack purse.
    Beginning
    Step 1. Let’s sew the straps. We have 4 of those.
    If you use fabric, fold the pattern No13 right side inside, stitch the sides together, turn right side out and finish the edges with a topstitch.
    If you use leather or artificial leather, trim allowance on the sides of the pattern No13. Glue the edges on the wrong side and fold them toward the center. Finish the edges with a topstitch.
    Put the resulting leather/fabric/webbing piece through the metallic frame, thus getting a part of the future strap.

    Step 2. Sew the straps to the pattern No5, in accordance with the plotted lines painted on it.
    Step 3. Place the pattern No6 (the lower edge) on top of the pattern No5 (the edge with the straps), and stitch with seam allowance, right sides facing each other. Turn the piece right side out and add do a topstitch along the seam (the seam allowance should be facing the bottom, the straps should be facing the back).
    Step 4. Now take resulting piece of Step 3, and match up the narrow part of the pattern No5 with the lower edge of the pattern No4, right sides facing each other.

    Stitch with seam allowance, fold back to the right side and finish with a topstitch along the seam on the side of the pattern No5 (the seam allowance should be facing toward the bottom).
    Step 5. To the resulting piece of Step 4, attach the edging, in accordance with the plotted lines on the pattern No6.
    Step 6. Preparing a zipper. Put the parts of the pattern No11 together, their right sides facing each other, so that the short end of the assembly covers a 40 cm long zipper. Stitch with 1 cm seam allowance and then topstitch along the seam.

    Step 7. Stitch the resulting pieces of Step 5 and Step 6 together, in accordance with the plotted lines. One flange of the zipper is now secured.

    Step 8. Place two parts of the pattern No7 (canvas) on top of each other, right sides facing each other, and sew along the lower edge with seam allowance.
    Flip both parts back.
    Place the resulting piece of Step 7 on the canvas, right sides facing each other, in accordance with the plotted lines. Sew with seam allowance to the edge of the pattern No4 (the assembly with the zipper).
    ***The beginning and the end of the line of stitching should not overlap the second canvas piece.
    Step 9. Turn the Pattern No8 right side out.
    Transfer the center point over onto the zipper tape.
    Cover it with the second piece of canvas, right sides facing each other, align the centers and the triangular bracings.
    Baste and stitch with 0.5 seam allowance.
    Step 10. Patch plate on the front.
    If you decided to make your patch plate rectangular, fold the edges to the center and do a topstitch along the folding lines.
    Sew the last pair of straps to the pattern No12. You may shorten these straps as much as possible.

    Step 11. Sew the resulting piece of Step 10 to the pattern No3.
    Step 12. Sew the resulting piece of Step 11 to the pattern No9, matching up the centers.
    Step 13. Now we’re going to sew the short handles.
    If you're using fabric, fold the parts of the pattern No10, right sides facing each other, and stitch with seam allowance.
    Turn the whole thing right side out, press it with an iron and do a topstitch along the folding lines.
    If you're using leather or artificial leather,
    glue the long sides to a depth of 2 cm. Hem in the seam allowance, then gently tap the folds with a small hammer.
    Fold the result in half and sew the folded hems together.
    Add another line of stitching at the same distance, parallel to the first.
    Round handle: an alternative.
    To make a round handle, you’ll need a cord, preferably the one that has a core. The circumference of the handle will depend on the diameter of the cord. The point here is to match the diameter of the cord to the inner part of the future handle. The cord should be equal to the pattern No10 in length, minus 2 cm of seam allowance.
    How to calculate the width of the pattern No10 (the round handle):
    Measure the diameter of the cord, if unknown. Add 3–5 mm so that is moves freely, and 2 cm allowance on top of that. That will give you get the necessary width.
    Fold the seam allowance to the wrong side. Glue (if you're using leather) or baste (if you’re using fabric). Match up the folded hems and sew.
    Using whatever you have at hand, pass the cord through the pattern.
    This is how I do it. First, I pick up a thick thread and a needle. Having cut 30 cm of the thread, I secure it at the end of the cord, winding it around several times with a needle. I also have a sturdy strand of wire. Folding it in half; I attach the free end of the thread to the bend.
    Then I pass the wire through my future short handle and draw the end of the cord on the other side.
    It will take some effort, because there is not too much room inside. It will be an easy journey from here.
    We now have the straps.
    Step 14. Sew the result of Step 13 (the short handles) to the short edges of the result of Step 12, right sides facing each other, at a distance of 1.5 cm from the corner.
    Step 15. Now let’s add our zipper.
    Fold the pattern No2 in half and put it on top of your main zipper, close to the teeth, but not too close.
    Sew along the folding line at a distance of 3–5 mm from the edge. If the zipper tape is wide, you may add another line of stitching, parallel to the first. Repeat with the second flange.
    Be sure to do the reversing to secure the end of the zipper so that it doesn’t pop open.

    Step 16. Sew the resulting piece of Step 15 to the even edge of the pattern No1 (made of outer fabric), right sides together. Repeat with the second part of pattern No1.
     
    Step 17. If you’re making a bag out of fabric, baste the resulting piece of the Step 14 to the resulting piece of the pattern 16, right sides together, at a distance of 1.5 cm from the upper edge of the pattern No1. Later this assembly will be stitched to the upper edge of the body of the bag.
    In order to make a beautiful even seam, use the markings on the pattern No1 that correspond to the markings on the bottom part of the resulting piece of Step 14.
    Do not sew the upper edges of the lining to the upper end of the body!

    Stitch the basted edges with seam allowance.
    Thus we get the future upper part of the backpack.
    Step 18. Put the two parts of the pattern No8 together, right sides facing each other, and stitch along the upper and lower edges. Turn right side out through the open sides. If you decided to make two pockets, repeat this last step with the second part of the pattern No8.
    Iron out the pocket edges.
    Step 19. Sew the resulting piece of Step 18 to the pattern No6, in accordance with the plotted lines. Sew or baste the sides, fixing them in place. Stitch along bottom folding line, thus attaching the lower part of the pocket. Or, you may stitch the pocket in one go: first the right side, then the bottom, and then the left.
    Step 20. Now, the lining for the body of your bag.
    Align the resulting piece of Step 19 and the pattern No9, and sew with seam allowance along the shorter edge, right sides facing each other.
    Press the seam allowance open.
    Step 21. Sew the result of the Step 20 with the pattern N1 (the lining), at a distance of 1.5 cm from the upper corner of that pattern. Leave an opening for turning your backpack right side out.
    Step 22. Unzip.
    Align the upper edges of the result of Step 21 (right side) to the upper edges of the resulting piece of Step 17 (wrong side). Sew with seam allowance.
    Step 23. Tuck the outer part of the bag into the lining. Do not turn the whole thing right side out yet.
    Align the open side edges of the lining and the zipper. Make sure that the edges of the inside and outside parts of the bag align.
    Sew with seam allowance.

    Step 24. Turn the backpack right side out through the opening in the lining.
    Tuck the lining into the backpack and check all of the seams for defects.
    All good? Then stitch the opening in the lining with a blind stitch.
    Step 25. Now let’s prepare the lower parts of the straps.
    Use the technique from step 13. We sewed the short handles there.
    Step 26. Slide on the strap adjusters.
    Detachable straps.
    Stitch the strap ends.
    Non-detachable straps.
    Pass the strap ends through the openings in the front part of the backpack and sew.
    Pass the other ends through the openings on the back (the ones on the straps) and then once more through the strap length adjusters, so as to form a second lover loop.
    Sewing the edge of the shoulder straps.
    P.S. If you find any part of the tutorial difficult, feel free to write a comment, and we’ll try to help.
    Please share the photos of your backpacks with us; we’ll be happy to add them to our Gallery!
    We’ll be happy to see your creations!

    Custom wedding invitation

    Custom wedding invitation
    I began preparing for my wedding with the making of the wedding invitations. The wedding is a pretty important occasion in the life of a woman, so I took the matter seriously.
    Naturally, I wanted my invitations to be hand-made and original. In this, I succeeded.
    Tools and materials
    2 sheets of scrapbooking paper, size 30.5*30.5 cm (I used Fleur Design Romantic Vintage and Romantic Patterns) A satin ribbon 1.2 cm wide A heat gun Embossing powder Alphabet stamp (Russian letters “В” and “Д” in my case) An embossing ink pad An acrylic stamping block Talcum powder and sponge (for degreasing) A cutting mat Sticky foam pads Glue Double-sided adhesive tape (narrow) Scissors, ruler, pencil, design knife, a pair of tweezers A creasing tool A corner hole punch for the insertion of the photograph First, I created files for cutting in the Canvas Workspace and transferred the designs to the cutting machine via USB flash drive. I used the slightly sticky cutting mat and a standard knife. Before the work started, I adjusted the knife (the paper density is very important here) and did several test cuts. Only after that, I proceeded to the scanning and positioning.

    I cut the following details: an envelope, an insert piece, and some decorative elements for the front part of my invitation (a carrier with two openings, a carved edge decoration, and an oval thing).

    If the cutting machine has left something uncut, don't panic. You can easily remedy it with a design knife.


    To get the neat-looking, I smoothed them out on all sides with a creasing tool and also made some folding creases on the envelope (center part and sides — let’s call them “wings”).



    I stuck small strips of adhesive tape on both “wings” and glued the parts of the envelope together.

    This resulted in a lot of workpieces.

    Using my hole punch, I made several openings the insert piece so that I could put in the text sheet later (you may glue it or use Canvas Workspace instead).

    I also decided to emboss the bride and bridegroom’s initials (you may just stamp them with ink or glue the word “Invitation” or something).
    For embossing, you’ll need:
    A heat gun Embossing powder An embossing ink pad “В” and “Д” stamps An acrylic stamping block Talcum powder and sponge (for degreasing)
    First, I prepared the surface, using talcum powder and sponge (so that the small particles of the embossing powder only stuck to the parts I had applied my stamp to).

    Then I used the pad to create the inscription, sprinkled the embossing powder, shook off the excess and heated the inscription. As the heat gun gets really hot, I recommend holding your paper with tweezers.



    All is ready for the assembling of the invitation:

    An envelope blank An insert piece Three decorative elements: The carrier with two openings, the decoration with carved edges and the oval thing with embossing A satin ribbon 1.2 mm wide Sticky foam pads Glue A ruler and scissors I held the ribbon to the envelope, measured the required length (it should be sufficient to go around the envelope), and cut. I could have singed the edge with a lighter, so as to prevent it from unraveling, but decided not to, for the ends were to be glued.

    Then I passed the ribbon through the carrier and glued one end of it almost at the center (use any glue you like).


    Then I pulled the ribbon tight, overlapped, and glued the second edge. I shifted the carrier toward the center so that it covered that spot.

    I used glue to attach the decoration with the carved edges, but you may replace it with double-sided adhesive tape. Then, I stuck the oval thing with embossing (my inscription) to the sticky foam pads.
    Our wedding invitation is ready.

    All that’s left to do is to print the text with the vital details about the wedding and to attach it.

    Original text by Valeria Balashova
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