Jump to content

Beautiful design, scene look amazing.

This embroidery work up perfectly and stitch out nicely. 
Buy Now

Excellent stitches and original style

Stitched out beautifully! Looked amazing and no issues!
Buy Now

Loving birds.. Wonderful designs, stitched out beautifully

Really cute, You love this when you stitched it. Would love more of same designs.
Buy Now

Our lady looks great

Stitched out beautifully! Wonderful decoration!
Buy Now

Adorable design. Stitches out beautifully.

"Thanks so much for this design It's lovely and stitched out beautifully on leather."
Buy Now
  • Machine embroidery consumables: what and how to use: Threads

    Finally! You’ve become a happy owner of an embroidery machine.  The euphoria from the purchase is gradually cooling off, and a whole array of questions arises before the new master. What to do next? Which threads to use? Which needles to use and how not to lose your way in a huge variety of stabilizers? In this article, based on my own experience, I’ll tell you what’s what and indicate issues you should focus upon in the first place and the ones that can be left for later.
    Threads
    High-quality threads guarantee a long life for your new helper. Let me tell you straight away: you should not use sewing threads for machine embroidery designs. Machine embroidery threads are polished in a special way so that very little or no noil appear. (Noil clutters the mechanism, thus reducing the lifespan of an embroidery machine). I must admit that some embroiderers use the ordinary sewing threads and, what’s more, advocate for such usage. Well, everybody should decide for themselves. For me, this is unacceptable, because an embroidery machine costs far too much to risk its health by using threads of low quality. The embroidery threads fit into several categories.
    1. Rayon threads
    These threads are made of rayon. They have a strong sheen. The embroidery is softer than the ones made with other threads. But there are also disadvantages. First, a sheen given by rayon threads in not always appropriate (for example, in the embroidery on men’s clothes). Second, rayon can be weakened by chlorine, therefore, items embroidered with rayon threads must not be bleached. Third, when using a water soluble stabilizer and then dissolving it in water rayon threads lose some of their luster and the embroidery becomes dimmer. Almost every manufacturer has an assortment of rayon embroidery threads. I can recommend Gunold Silky threads, because they are good for their money. On the other hand, the threads made by several Chinese manufacturers have left a very unfavorable impression. Better to spend a little more and embroider comfortably than to use cheap threads and have to deal with persistent thread breakage and knots.
    2. Polyester threads
    Polyester embroidery threads are practically as good as rayon ones, and in some ways even better. Their sheen is more restrained, they are chlorine-resistant and are compatible with water-soluble stabilizers. There are well-established threads by Amann (Isacord), Gunold (Poly) and Madeira, although the last ones are rather pricey.
    3. Cotton threads
    These threads are matt-finished, thus helping to imitate hand embroidery. This is of vital importance for vyshyvanka (a Ukrainian traditional embroidered shirt), cross stitch, embroidery on men’s clothes and so on.

    Due to these threads being rather thick, it is recommended to run the machine at a low speed.
    Polyester threads with cotton sheath, like the ones made by Amann (Rasant), are a good alternative. They combine the durability of polyester with the matt finish of the cotton threads.
    4. Metallic threads
    These are essentially durable polyester threads with a metallic sheath.

    Special needles should be used with metallic threads. Do not cover large areas with them, because they leave miniature notches, and may lead to loops and thread breakage in future.
    Other types of embroidery threads
    This type of threads includes acrylic threads that imitate woolen embroidery, various fluorescent threads that glow at night, like Glowy by Gunold, chameleonic threads that change their color in the sunlight, etc.
    I’d like to place the embroidery underthreads into a separate category. These are the ultra-thin threads that are reeled on a bobbin. They make the wrong side of the embroidery soft without adding weight.
    For a beginner, I’d recommend to first purchase a basic floss palette containing 2 or 3 shades of every color + monochromatic colors + underthreads, and then add the necessary colors on demand.

    Interfacing, Filmoplast, Solufix and machine embroidery threads

    Using high-quality stabilizers is key to making high-quality machine embroidery designs with a variety of stitches, appliqué and other sewing techniques.
    Because fabrics tend to stretch during sewing or embroidery, a stabilizer is placed under the fabric.
    There are several types of stabilizing materials:
    Tearaway stabilizer, made of fibers that tear easily. Use it when embroidering on woven fabrics. On completion, tear the stabilizer away. Small leftover bits on the wrong side of the embroidery won’t get in the way.
    Water-soluble stabilizer – looks like a film but dissolves in water. Place it on top of the fabric to be embroidered.
    Tear-resistant cutaway stabilizer. This one is ideal for the designs with large stitch count and density, multipart embroidery appliqué, as well as logos and inscriptions. On completion, trim the extra bits.
    The adhesive stabilizer is used when it’s impossible to hoop the embroidery or the hoop will leave traces (velour, for instance).
    FILMOPLAST® – a multi-purpose non-woven material.
    The most convenient stabilizer to use: embroider without hooping. So, no traces on a delicate fabric. It has a sticky side and provides good support for open-mesh and knitwear fabrics, while also enhancing the look of the embroidery. It is perfect for embroidering small parts of the item which are impossible to hoop. Also, you can embroider baseball caps without a cap frame – simply stick them to FILMOPLAST® and push the start button.
     
     

    Types of stabilizers in machine embroidery.

    There are two types of stabilizers: toppings and backings.
    A top stabilizer (topping) is used to prevent stitches from sinking into loosely spun and textured fabrics. Use a top stabilizer when embroidering on knitwear, velvet or velour to help stitches to stay in place. A top stabilizer won't prevent fabric from puckering. For this purpose, use backing.  For laces, the backing is used as a base fabric.
    Machine embroidery stabilizers (interfacing, etc.) in our shop.
    Backing
    Backings are special, primarily non-woven materials, that provide support and stabilize the fabric during the embroidery, prevent creasing, distortion, and stretch. They are put under the fabric being embroidered.
    There are several types of backings: tearaway, adhesive, cutaway, water-soluble, heat-away.
    Tearaway stabilizers
    Tearaway stabilizers usually consist of paper of varying density (thickness).
    Tearaway stabilizers are good for most natural fabrics and give only a temporary support. This kind of stabilizer is easily removed and can be successfully used in cases where the wrong side will be seen (towels, plaids, scarfs and so on). It is also widely used with non-transparent fabrics of fair colors, with thick and densely woven fabrics made of natural fibers (denim, for example). Not recommended for any kinds of knits.
    Adhesive stabilizers
    These are glued to the wrong side of the item, thus giving it stability.
    There are several types of adhesives:
    An ordinary adhesive stabilizer with glue on one side. The item is attached to it with an iron.
    Adhesive paper with a sticky side covered with a protective layer. This paper is necessary when embroidering tricky fabrics: velvet, cashmere, leather, which are better not to be hooped. And also for the items that are hard to hoop: collars, cuffs, small details.
    An adhesive paper is placed in the hoop with a sticky side facing up, then the protective layer the size of the embroidery area is removed, and the item is placed on top. Having embroidered the item, tear the paper away. Example: FILMOPLAST®.
    Cutaway stabilizers
    Cutaway stabilizers (backings) are used for stabilizing highly stretchable fabrics and provide constant support during the embroidery. One needs them to embroider a machine embroidery design with a lot of stitches, in order to avoid fabric distortion, preventing the appearance of bulges or concavities (the effect stays even after several washes).
    A cutaway stabilizer is always thicker than a tearaway. It consists of a non-woven fabric made of long fibers on the basis of polyester or rayon. The way the fibers are arranged in a stabilizer defines its purpose.
    If the fibers are mainly single-oriented, it stretches and tears in this one direction. Therefore, to stabilize the fabric properly you need to use 2 layers of backing, positioning them perpendicularly. There are backings of varying density.
    Bonding short fibers (polyester, rayon, cellulose) together by solvent treatment, you'll get a non-woven fabric of high quality, which is soft like a tearaway stabilizer, has a smooth surface and does not stretch in any direction. This stabilizer can be of varying density and just one layer of it is sufficient. It is considered the best embroidery stabilizer because it does not add extra volume to the embroidery and does not show through the fabric.
    Among the cutaway stabilizers, one should note spunbond – a thin, very soft material that resembles a waffle. USA Poly Mesh or No Show Mesh stabilizers. This kind of backing is good because it does not stretch at all, providing support all the time, and is not visible through the fabric. It comes in various colors and densities. It is used for knits.
    Solvent stabilizers
    Solvent stabilizers include a water-soluble fabric-like stabilizer and a water-soluble film of varying density. They are used for stabilizing the embroidery when it is necessary to remove the backing without traces. For example, organza, transparent fabrics, FSL, and cutwork.
    Water-soluble stabilizers come in two varieties: textile interfacing materials and films
    100% polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) stabilizers Both are dissolved in water. Time of dissolution depends on the temperature of water. Approximate valued by Gunold:
    20 °C about 3 min 25 °C about 2 min 30 °C about 1 min 40 °C about 15 sec In real life, water-solubles are not so easily removed, and it takes more than one round to get rid of it completely.
    The intended purpose of a water-soluble film depends on its thickness:
    Thin (20 microns) Used as toppings for lightweight fabrics.
    Medium (35 microns) are used for textured fabrics (velour with and without pile, velvet, fur and loop fabrics). When embroidering small details and letters on textured fabrics the film should be placed on top for better results.
    Dense (80 microns) are used as a base fabric for so-called 3D embroidery, FSL, chevrons, cutwork, and as a stabilizer for the fabrics where the wrong side should look good, also for transparent fabrics.
    Heat-away stabilizers
    They are used when it is necessary to stabilize the fabric, which shouldn't get wet and you need to remove the backing leftovers. They can be successfully used for creating FSL, as well as water-soluble film. They are removed with a very hot iron (no less than 120°) through the paper. Under no circumstances should steam be used with fusible stabilizers.
    Upper stabilizers (toppings)
    These are necessary to prevent the stitches from sinking into the pile, loops, fur and other materials of that kind, also with loosely-knitted fabrics. Gelatin-based toppings are widely known because they can be easily solved in water. This is what is called a water-soluble film.
    There are two types of water-soluble film: thin and thick (dense). Thin film is used practically with everything, thick one – only with high piles.
    Next kind of stabilizers is a fusible stabilizer. They are used in cases when the fabric cannot be washed, and therefore, the use of water-soluble film is not possible.
     

    In-The-Hoop. A heart for sweets on a Sweetheart Day

    Original text by Marina Belova 
    A few days ago I remembered that St Valentines Day was ahead, so why not to invent something special for the occasion (I have already made an embroidered postcard). Though I have plenty of ideas, I settled on another project that doesn't involve a sewing machine. 
    As the result, I got this bag for candies with a Velcro. With the candies properly tucked inside. 

    Initially, I intended to make a heart with a zipper but abandoned this highly interesting option shortly after. The lack of an appropriately colored zipper was the reason. Therefore, I opted for a Velcro fastener instead. I should try it out, shouldn't I? 
    Having measured the Velcro, I drew a very simple picture (very simple was exactly what I needed): 

    Then I created 2 simple designs. One for the box itself. With its help I prepared 2 templates which would be then fastened with a Velcro: 

    The second one was for the back side and holding all the details together: 

    I chose fleece, a knitwear fabric, as a basis for my embroidery. I opted for it not only because it was of an appropriate color (pink), but also because this fabric was highly stretchy so it would be convenient for me to fill it with the sweets afterward. 
    Time to proceed to the embroidery. I hoop the stabilizer: 

    Load the first half of the design and stitch the guideline that will mark the position of our future embroidery: 

    Then attach the first part of the Velcro with its adhesive side in. I secured it with a paper tape, like that: 

    Put a piece of fleece on top on the Velcro: 

    Started the machine, stitched the Velcro, secured the edge with a zig-zag, embroidered the first part of the front side of the heart and marked the place for the next detail: 

    Now it's the time to position another piece along the key lines: 

    Then stitch the fleece to the stabilizer. The basting stitch shows where the Velcro is going to be. I forgot to make a snapshot. But, in my opinion, everything is clear even without it, especially if you take a look at the picture containing the first part of the design. I attached the Velcro adhesive side up along the guideline and secured it with tape: 

    Stitched it: 

    Took out all the details, cut along the perimeter. These will be my templates for the next stage — sewing parts of the heart together. 
    Hooped another piece of stabilizer: 

    Loaded the second half of the design and marked the places where parts of the heart will be joined together: 

    Took the hoop off the machine, turned it the wrong way out and secured a piece of fleece on the layout with temporary spray adhesive – this would be the back side of my box. The fabric should be face up: 

    Carefully, so as not to shift the fabric from below,I inserted the hoop back into the machine. 

    Time for attaching the front side of the heart bounded together with a Velcro fastener. Which is what I did: 

    I started the machine and stitched the heart with the small-scale zig-zag along the perimeter. I was lucky and two zig-zags almost completely coincided. Usually, it is hard to position all the details on the layout and achieve a perfect fit:

    Once again, take the hoop off and turn them the wrong side up: 

    Trim the extra fabric near zig-zag: 

    After that you can replace your bobbin thread with the one matching your upper thread in color: 

    Insert the hoop back into the machine and embroider the finishing border: 

    Detach the heart from the stabilizer. 

    Then do the cleaning: remove the threads that stick out, also connectors, and singe the edges with the lighter so that to get rid of the protruding fibers. I haven't removed the stabilizer and left it as it is. Almost ready. 
    Fill the heart with the sweets: 

    After that, act according to the situation. 
    As a result of my impromptu, I've come to the following conclusions: 
    Don't stitch the Velcro with a finishing border — the result will be too dense. You can avoid it by using a smaller piece.  If you slightly change the sequence in the second part of the design, you can embroider the back side of the heart, too. In that case, it won't look so empty. 
    This would also reduce the number of steps.  But, as they say, the first pancake is always a failure. 
  • Free machine embroidery designs

  • Last popular topics about machine embroidery

  • Embroidery Blog Entries

    • By duferk2 in Machine embroidery, digitizing, news, ideas help
         3
      hello, i have machine Brother pro 1050X. i have problem Embroidery pattern does not sew out correctly. look photo. how fix this problem? thanks
    • By Embroidery Life in Machine embroidery, digitizing, news, ideas help
         0
      Im looking to buy a needle embroidery machine and found one for sale on Sold Tiger as well as other embroidery equipment. I thought many of you here will be interested in some embroidery equipment.
    • By Travis in Machine embroidery, digitizing, news, ideas help
         0
      The present focused market calls for imaginative ways to deal with advancement of custom embroidery services. From imaginative introductions to simple to-explore online web stores to stunning IT administration frameworks, we give our clients the ability to broaden their corporate marking activities and surpass their showcasing objectives. Also, our far reaching request preparing and satisfaction administrations enable them to stay concentrated on their center business while our turnkey operation deals with the difficulties of the advancements and satisfaction business.
      Considering your alternatives for custom attire, embroidered clothing conveys a fundamental feeling of value that addresses the intuitive of customers and clients, giving a sentiment trust and fulfillment.
      Advantages of custom embroidery:
      It gives you a professional appearance. It can be put on a wide assortment of materials. It lasts longer (doesn't wear off like silkscreen paint does). It can be washed easily. Large amount of shades are accessible in it. Some typical examples of custom embroidery embroider clothing are:
      Hoodies – flexible for a scope of icy climate outside work. Sweatshirts – like hoodies, a sweatshirt is extraordinary to keeping warm and agreeable. Fleeces– Zipped fleeces are a decent hindrance against unforgiving conditions. Shorts – In summer, shorts for men and ladies are accessible to keep cool. Action Trousers – A more down to earth and hard wearing other option to brilliant pants. Body warmers – Another extraordinary expansion to icy climate work.




×