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Beautiful design, Morning owl look amazing.

This embroidery work up perfectly and stitch out nicely. 
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Excellent stitches and original style

Stitched out beautifully! Looked amazing and no issues!
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Loving birds.. Wonderful designs, stitched out beautifully

Really cute, You love this when you stitched it. Would love more of same designs.
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Our designs looks great

Stitched out beautifully! Wonderful decoration!
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Adorable design. Stitches out beautifully.

"Thanks so much for this design It's lovely and stitched out beautifully on leather."
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  • Custom wedding invitation

    Custom wedding invitation
    I began preparing for my wedding with the making of the wedding invitations. The wedding is a pretty important occasion in the life of a woman, so I took the matter seriously.
    Naturally, I wanted my invitations to be hand-made and original. In this, I succeeded.
    Tools and materials
    2 sheets of scrapbooking paper, size 30.5*30.5 cm (I used Fleur Design Romantic Vintage and Romantic Patterns) A satin ribbon 1.2 cm wide A heat gun Embossing powder Alphabet stamp (Russian letters “В” and “Д” in my case) An embossing ink pad An acrylic stamping block Talcum powder and sponge (for degreasing) A cutting mat Sticky foam pads Glue Double-sided adhesive tape (narrow) Scissors, ruler, pencil, design knife, a pair of tweezers A creasing tool A corner hole punch for the insertion of the photograph First, I created files for cutting in the Canvas Workspace and transferred the designs to the cutting machine via USB flash drive. I used the slightly sticky cutting mat and a standard knife. Before the work started, I adjusted the knife (the paper density is very important here) and did several test cuts. Only after that, I proceeded to the scanning and positioning.

    I cut the following details: an envelope, an insert piece, and some decorative elements for the front part of my invitation (a carrier with two openings, a carved edge decoration, and an oval thing).

    If the cutting machine has left something uncut, don't panic. You can easily remedy it with a design knife.


    To get the neat-looking, I smoothed them out on all sides with a creasing tool and also made some folding creases on the envelope (center part and sides — let’s call them “wings”).



    I stuck small strips of adhesive tape on both “wings” and glued the parts of the envelope together.

    This resulted in a lot of workpieces.

    Using my hole punch, I made several openings the insert piece so that I could put in the text sheet later (you may glue it or use Canvas Workspace instead).

    I also decided to emboss the bride and bridegroom’s initials (you may just stamp them with ink or glue the word “Invitation” or something).
    For embossing, you’ll need:
    A heat gun Embossing powder An embossing ink pad “В” and “Д” stamps An acrylic stamping block Talcum powder and sponge (for degreasing)
    First, I prepared the surface, using talcum powder and sponge (so that the small particles of the embossing powder only stuck to the parts I had applied my stamp to).

    Then I used the pad to create the inscription, sprinkled the embossing powder, shook off the excess and heated the inscription. As the heat gun gets really hot, I recommend holding your paper with tweezers.



    All is ready for the assembling of the invitation:

    An envelope blank An insert piece Three decorative elements: The carrier with two openings, the decoration with carved edges and the oval thing with embossing A satin ribbon 1.2 mm wide Sticky foam pads Glue A ruler and scissors I held the ribbon to the envelope, measured the required length (it should be sufficient to go around the envelope), and cut. I could have singed the edge with a lighter, so as to prevent it from unraveling, but decided not to, for the ends were to be glued.

    Then I passed the ribbon through the carrier and glued one end of it almost at the center (use any glue you like).


    Then I pulled the ribbon tight, overlapped, and glued the second edge. I shifted the carrier toward the center so that it covered that spot.

    I used glue to attach the decoration with the carved edges, but you may replace it with double-sided adhesive tape. Then, I stuck the oval thing with embossing (my inscription) to the sticky foam pads.
    Our wedding invitation is ready.

    All that’s left to do is to print the text with the vital details about the wedding and to attach it.

    Original text by Valeria Balashova

    Cherry tree blossom: revamping old roller shades

    Cherry tree blossom: revamping old roller shades
    Roller shades have become a customary part of our homes. Thanks to the huge variety of textures and sizes, they can be easily adjusted to fit into our interior environments. And, should you make some changes to your interior design (I did), you can easily transform them, let’s say, by adding an oriental touch – a cherry tree blossom to remind you of the first rays of sunshine. For this tutorial, I’ll be using a design found on the Internet. I’ll alter it a bit, then cut it out using ScanNCut, and after that add some finishing touches with the help of a stencil.
    Materials
    Two pieces of roller shade material to fit your windows + fittings or two ready roller shades 30 cm wide. ScanNCut machine. Standard mat, 30 or 60 cm long, depending on the size of your design. A piece of paper large enough to fit your stencil. White craft glue. Fabric paints (I used acrylic). A sponge (or a paintbrush). A design. First, I made some changes to the picture I found (a cherry tree branch) in Canvas Workspace (the former ScаnNCutCanvas). You’ll need 2 files, one for making a stencil, and another one for cutting the roller shade.
    Open the image in your Canvas Workspace, go to Image Tracing, and press Color–Preview–OK.


    Select all objects, right-click and press Group. Save the result to a USB flash drive. This is our file No1. We’ll use it to create a stencil.

    Now, we proceed to the pattern for the shade. We’ll only need those objects that are going to be cut. Select all stems on the image and press Delete. Only the flowers should be left. This is our file No2. We’ll use it to cut the roller shade.


    Select all objects, right-click and press Group. Save the result to USB flash drive.

    (In order for the patterns on the shades to differ slightly, I deleted several flowers on the bottom and saved them into a separate file).
    Let’s prepare our roller shades.
    I cut 30 cm from each piece of fabric, thus getting two shades 30 cm wide (because my cutting mat is 30 cm wide). Metallic tubes on top and bottom of every shade should be filed with a mill file. Slide the bottom hem of the shade from the metal tube and detach the cardboard strip.


    Or, you may use a couple of existing roller shades, 30 cm wide each. In that case, you’ll only need to de-tube them and remove the strips.
    Secure the bottom edge of the shade to the mat and do the test cut. (Blade length 5, pressure 4. Other values may be used, depending on the material your roller shade is made of).

    Open file No2 in ScanNCut. Now let’s alter the design a bit: first invert it, then check the size and placement. Cut out your pattern and unpeel it from the mat.



    Repeat with the second roller shade. Change the size and placement of the design and cut.


    Apply some white craft glue to the wrong side of the narrow parts to give them additional strength. After the glue dries, it won’t be visible.

    Cut out a paper stencil, using file No1. Blade length 4, pressure 0.


    Align your stencil with the pattern on the shade and secure it with pieces of an adhesive tape.
    To be on the safe side, I also taped over the flowers, to prevent the paint from getting there. Squeeze the paint onto the paper, dip your paintbrush/sponge into it and start tapping on the openings in the stencil.




    It will take approximately 5 hours for the paint to dry. After that, take away your stencil, attach strips of cardboard to the bottom parts of the shades and insert metallic tubes.



    Attach fittings to the narrow shades and put them up.

    Hopefully, this will add a bit of sunshine into your winter homes.


    The idea for the decoration in this tutorial was found on the Internet.
    Original text by Maria Bespalova

    Sewing accessories: a Ruffler foot

    Sewing accessories: a Ruffler foot
    Pleats are cute! Ruffles, pleats, and frills are fashionable again. You can use the main fabric or decorative ribbons, and attach the ruffles to the garment or at the edge. The variety of textures in one garment is very popular this season. This article contains three short tutorials. You may choose the one you like for the embellishment of your apparel. Revamp a dress you grew tired of, replace old and dull sleeves with the puffed ones with the cute ruffled ribbon decoration.
    Revamping an old dress: Materials
    A dress A sewing machine Sewing threads The Ruffler foot 65 cm of chiffon fabric of the matching color Ribbons of varying width and texture, of the matching colors
    Revamping an old dress: Ruffler foot
    Attach the Ruffler foot and ruffle your ribbons. They will look as if made by a professional. Feeding the fabric to be ruffled into the foot with a steady hand at an even pace, you’ll finish the job quickly.
    Adjust the depth screw. You may choose any value between 1 and 8. The higher the number, the deeper the pleat (more fabric is tucked into the foot). If you set it to 1 or 2, the attachment will create very narrow pleats. Set it to 8, and the pleats will be as deep as possible. Using the manual, replace your ordinary presser foot with a Ruffler foot.


    Adjust the ruffle regulator. The lever can be put in one of the four possible positions: 1, 6, 12 and *. If set to 1, the ruffle will be made with every stitch. If set to 6, the ruffle will appear every 6 stitches, and if set to 12, every twelfth stitch. In case you need a straight stitch, set the lever to *. The stitch length also affects the distance between the ruffles. The lower it is, the closer together they will be.
    Set your needle in the center position. Push a ribbon through the foot. Put one end of the ribbon in a piece of paper and push it between the ruffling blade and the fabric feed plate. After that, the paper can be removed.



    Position the ribbon in such a way that the needle is exactly in the middle between its two edges. Sew at a low speed. Don’t forget to check: the row of stitches should run in the middle.  


    Adjust the ruffle depth and the distance between the ruffles in accordance with the ribbon width. The narrower the ribbon, the lesser the pleat depth. 


    Revamping an old dress: Decorating the sleeves
    Prepare your sleeves for the decoration. Rip them out, unravel the seams and iron out the pieces. Now, you need to cut the identical pieces out of the chiffon.
    Fold the chiffon in half, with its right side inside. Place the “real” sleeve on top and cut along the outline. To the newly-cut chiffon parts, fuse the interfacing material. It will strengthen the fabric and prevent it from shifting. 


    Lay out the prepared ribbons on top. Alternate wide and narrow ones. Pin them and sew the straight stitch along the gathering line. You may cover the seam with a cord or a narrow satin ribbon. Attach the cord with a zigzag stitch.  



    Once the ribbons are attached, remove the interfacing material from the wrong side.


    Fold the hems, sew the sleeves and attach them to the arm-holes.

    Wear happily! 


    In the second part of our article, we are going to sew a summer jacket with basque and decorate it with a ruffled satin ribbon.
    Summer jacket with basque. Materials
    Fabric for the jacket (110 cm long and 140 cm wide) Jacket sewing pattern (to the waistline) A 20x90 cm piece of colored satin for the decoration A Ruffler foot A sewing machine Sewing threads Summer jacket with basque. Preparing the decoration
    Adjust the depth screw. Set the depth screw to 8. Using the manual, replace your ordinary presser foot with a Ruffler foot. Set your needle in the center position. 


    Set the ruffle regulator to 6, so that every 6 stitches you get a ruffle.
    Cut the colored satin fabric into strips 6 cm wide and approximately 180–200 cm long. Fold the ribbon in half (lengthwise) and iron out all the way. Put one end of the ribbon in a piece of paper and push it between the ruffling blade and the fabric feed plate. After that, the paper can be removed. Place the needle above the ribbon 1 cm from its edge. Sew at a low speed. Check the position of the seam: it should run 1 cm from the edge.  



    Press down the ruffles with an iron.


    Summer jacket with basque. Sewing
    Cut out the parts and sew the sides, shoulders, and darts. 


    Pin the already ruffled satin ribbon to the right front part along the centerline, around the neckline and 15 cm under the neckline on the left front edge. Stitch close to the edge.


    Sew the facing and the neckline facing together. On top of the decoration, pin the facing and the neckline facing to the right front part of your jacket on the right side, and stitch 1 cm from the edge.
    Turn the facing the wrong side out and iron out. Using the edge stitch presser foot, finish the edge (stitch on the right side).
    For the basque, prepare a piece of fabric approximately 160 cm long and 11 cm wide. Turn up the lower edge and stitch. 


    Along the upper edge, attach the ruffles, 1 cm from the edge. 


    Press down the ruffles on the basque with an iron. Pin the basque to the lower part of the jacket and sew.


    Cover the seam with a satin ribbon 1.5 cm wide (in the ready state) and stitch on both sides. Prior to that, fold the hems and flatten them with an iron. 


    Sew the sleeve, fold the hem and stitch. Attach the sleeve to the arm-hole. Attach the snap fasteners.


    “One-click” cascade ruffles
    All you need to sew a dress with cascade ruffles is a piece of fabric and a Ruffler foot. This tutorial will show you the possible variants of cascade ruffles, assembled at home.
    “One-click” cascade ruffles Version 1
    For this job, you’ll need: A sewing machine Sewing threads A Ruffler foot A piece of lace 15 cm wide and 600 cm long, for a three-tier skirt with a 60–65 cm waistline “One-click” cascade ruffles. Creating the ruffles
    Prepare the lace for the skirt. Adjust the depth screw. Set the depth screw to 8.
    Set the ruffle regulator to 6, so that every 6 stitches you get a ruffle. Set your needle in the center position. You can narrow the distance between the pleats by reducing the stitch length. Do the test sewing.


    Push the lace through the foot. Position the needle above the lace 1 cm from the edge. Sew at a low speed. Check the position of the seam: it should run 1 cm from the edge. Ruffle the whole length of the lace piece. It will be used to create a three-tier skirt.


    “One-click” cascade ruffles. Sewing the dress
    Sew the bodice on the sides. Don’t touch the back seam. Starting from the center back, stitch the first tier of ruffles to the bodice along the waistline, right sides inside. Cut the excess lace. The seam at the back should remain open all the way.


    Stitch the second tier of the ruffles to the first one. Hide the end of the ruffled lace under the first tier of ruffles. Sew the straight stitch on the right side. Cut the excess lace. Stitch the third tier to the second one. Sew the dress at the back, from the neck hole to the lower edge.  



    Finish the neck hole and attach the sleeves.

    “One-click” cascade ruffles Version 2
    For this job, you’ll need:
    A sewing machine Sewing threads A Ruffler foot A piece of lining 13 cm wide and equal to the lace in length. A piece of lace 15 cm wide and 500 cm long, for a three-tier skirt with a 55 cm waistline. “One-click” cascade ruffles. Preparing lace
    Do steps 1 and 2 from Version 1. Cover the lining with the lace, align them together and push the whole into the foot. Place the needle above the ribbon 1 cm from the edge.
    Sew at a low speed. Check the position of the seam: it should run 1 cm from the edge. You will ruffle two fabrics simultaneously.


    Ruffle the whole length of the lace piece. It will be used to create a three-tier skirt.


    “One-click” cascade ruffles. Sewing the dress
    Sew the bodice on the sides. Don’t touch the back seam. Starting from the center back, stitch the first tier of ruffles to the bodice along the waistline, right sides inside. Cut the excess lace. The seam at the back should remain open all the way.


    Stitch the second tier of ruffles to the lining of the first tier, using a straight stitch. Cut the excess lace.

    Stitch the third tier to the lining of the second one. Sew skirt at the back in two stages. First, all lace tiers, with their right sides together. Then, all lining tiers with one seam.  



    Finish the neck hole and attach the sleeves.

    Original text by Olga Milovanova
    Read also: 
     
     

    How to use a Ruffler foot

    How to use a Ruffler foot
    Today, we’ll be working with a presser foot designed for the creation of the pleats, frills and ruffles. A little while ago I promised to show you what the Ruffler foot is capable of. At the first glance, the contraption seems a bit complicated. Several adjusters and guides allow you to gather fabric and simultaneously attach ruffles to the garment. Let’s see how it works.

    The Ruffler foot structure:
    A bifurcated arm (4) serves to synchronize the attachment with the needle bar. The clamp (5) is for quick attachment of the foot to the machine. Two screws and the adapter at the rear enable the foot to move up and down, and to the left and to the right of the needle bar. Adjusters:
    The depth screw (1) determines the amount of fabric pushed into the foot every time it tucks: from 1 to 8 mm. With the ruffle regulator (2), you determine how often a ruffle will appear: every 1, 6 or 12 stitches. Once set it to *, the attachment will create no ruffles at all. Fabric guide lines:
    Green line — for the main fabric, no ruffles. Red line — the ruffling blade. Lilac line — the fabric feed plate (also for braids, ribbons).

    You may place your fabric along any of the three guide lines, but only using the red one will give you ruffles.
    Stitch at a low or medium speed!
    Types of ruffles and pleats:
    Single or double pleat. To create one or the other, place one (or two, in the latter case) pieces of fabric to be ruffled, along the red guide line. Set the depth screw at 4 or higher. Set the Ruffle regulator to 6 or 12.

    How to ruffle fabric and attach it to the main fabric simultaneously
    Set the regulators to make single or double pleats. Insert the main fabric into the guide along the green guide line.

    You can create a twisted pleat, using a capronic or a satin band, or a specially prepared piece of fabric up to 7 cm wide. Set the stitch length at 2.5 mm. Set the depth screw at 1–3, and the ruffle regulator at 1.

    It’s also possible to ruffle fabric and simultaneously attach it to two flat fabrics, on the top and bottom. In order to do this, insert the main fabric with its right side facing up, into the foot along the green guide line, and the fabric to be pleated along the red line, with its right side also facing up. Along the lilac line, place the second piece of fabric, with its wrong side facing up.
    Use the prongs on the foot for the width of the seam allowance to be consistent.


    How to attach a pleat, folded in half, to the hem of the garment
    Finish your seam allowance with an overlocker.
    Mark the width of the seam allowance on the right side with a fabric marker. Place the main fabric along the green guide line, and the fabric to be ruffled along the red one.
    Adjust the regulators.
    Stitch to create the ruffles.
    Press down seam allowance to the wrong side and stitch along the edge.

    Joining the satin ribbon to the pleat
    Place the main fabric along the green guide line, and the fabric to be ruffled along the red one.
    Insert a narrow (up to 5 mm) satin ribbon into the foot, using the prong. Stitch.


    These are just the highlights of what the Ruffler is capable of. Play around with it, creating your own variants.
    Read what you can do with the Ruffler foot:
    Original text by Yelena Kraftwork
  • Free machine embroidery designs

  • Blog Entries

    • By diver361 in Machine embroidery, digitizing, news, ideas help
         1
      Introduction to Embroidery Blending Colors.
      In this blog we will introduce you to some terminology the you will need to understand to make blends possible. We will also explain the different methods for creating blends in your embroidery software.
      Terminology
      Density The density is a value of how close the stitches are to one another, there are few ways to measure it depending on the units you use. The three units are Stitches Per Inch (spi) Points (pts) Millimeters (mm) the standard is listed below.
      Standard density is 63.5 spi = 4 pts = .4 mm
      Absolute Density Is similar to WYSIWYG the value is a true value. With this option checked your density would be 63.5 spi , if you lower it , 55 spi it will show that. If you do not have this option checked your starting point will be 0 and if you want to go to 55 spi you would have to put in -8.5.
      Traveling lines this is the line that connects part of a fill, often fills will divide at some point and re join you can manipulate this using your start and stop points. These lines often go through the center of the design, their is an option to force the to the outside I recommend using this option when blending fills.
      Blend Tool Depending on your version you may have an option to blend colors this is called the blend tool. This is standard in the TAJIMA Maestro Level
      Density Line Tool In version Tajima DGML by Pulse Version 14 and DG15 depending on the level you may have a icon called density line tool. This allows you to control the embroidery density at different increments of the blend.
      As you may know blending is a technique of layering two or more colors to get an effect of a blend, the digital world has been using blending for years however its not as common in embroidery. There are several different methods of blending that I am aware of. Blending with embroidery threads, or by layering one or more fills over each other. Another way to create an effect of a blend is to use the multimedia approach and add a image or vinyl behind the embroidery., which we covered in past blogs called multimedia designs.
      Blending with Embroidery Threads
      This technique is not new, it has been used in the home embroidery field for hundreds of years, and it allows you to create depth to a design. One option is to blend a heavy thread as a fill and covered by a top layer with a smaller thread. Another way to blend thread types is to have the blue fill going horizontal at 35 spit and the red fill going vertical at 25 spi when you sew them out like this it will blend the two colors creating an illusion of a third color,

      The Irish embroidery design use layers to blend the two colors together to get the effect of a pattern with the leaves, there is a light green background and a dark green layered on top. This technique can be applied to a wide range of designs and works best with similar colors.
      Samples of Blending
      Here are some samples, of types of blending that is available .. you can see the layers when zoomed in but remember the machine embroidery design is only a quarter of that size below.



      Blend Tool ( Maestro Level only )
      For some of us we have a tool that allows us to create blends. This is a great tool for making the sunset fade into the water.. However it can be done manually its rather simple with this tool. Below is the Automatic tool for making blends.
      1. Start a NEW document
      2. With the eclipse tool draw a circle 5 inches

      You could also add greater depth by using two different weights of thread by doing this it will cause the top stitch to sit on top of the bottom stitch.
      3. Convert the circle to a complex fill , right click or CTRL E to bring up the menu to convert too option appears.

      4. Right Click on the fill and choose Auto.. and then select color blend and you will see the following .

      5. Change the above setting to match the image and then click OK to save the settings
      6. Then right click and choose Break up

      Note I change the colors so its visible to blue and orange, as red and orange will be hard to see on the screen.
      There are a couple things I would recommend is
      - High light each segment and goto properties,
      - Goto complex fill effects and change the travelling route to the edge, this will get rid of the lines going through the middle of the embroidery design.

      Tips for embroidery digitizer
      When working with blends they work best on contrasting colors that are closely related to each other, like light blue and dark blue, oranges and reds, orange and yellows, I recommend everyone make a blend and try different densities, angles and colors to experiment with the tools and develop and understanding how it cane be used.
      Author: Frank Prokator
    • By Hunter11 in Machine embroidery, digitizing, news, ideas help
         1
      A question we have been asked many a times on our blog and via our audience. However, we were keen to poll the community and find out exactly which brand you find the best, what better place to do it than here. Please vote on your best embroidery machine and we will update the results to our recent guide to share with our embroidery fanatics!
      Happy Voting!
       
       
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