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Beautiful design, Morning owl look amazing.

This embroidery work up perfectly and stitch out nicely. 
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Excellent stitches and original style

Stitched out beautifully! Looked amazing and no issues!
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Loving birds.. Wonderful designs, stitched out beautifully

Really cute, You love this when you stitched it. Would love more of same designs.
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Our designs looks great

Stitched out beautifully! Wonderful decoration!
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Adorable design. Stitches out beautifully.

"Thanks so much for this design It's lovely and stitched out beautifully on leather."
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  • Cording, part 1

    Original text by: Marina Belova 
    A few day ago I decided to practice cord embroidery, hence I have the required equipment. Without further ado, I chose the simplest possible design from the old Briggs’ Patent collection, which was originally intended for embroidery with cord or ribbon. Here it is: 

    I digitized the design with a simple running stitch using the same methods as described in my previous article on cord embroidery. Below is the preview of my design: 

    So I started the embroidery. Before pressing the start button I inserted the newly bought silk cord 3 mm wide and set the piping foot in a required way. The cord was of an appropriate size and could fit into the biggest groove under the piping foot on my machine. 

    But something went wrong. I stopped the whole process, soon after having started.

    The cord turned out to be too tightly woven, and the thread kept breaking. As I didn't have any monofilament yarn, I tried to sew it with ordinary polyester thread. 
    And I didn't like the result in the least. I chose one of my knitting threads — soft cotton one, made of several twisted fibers, and wound it instead of the cord on the same plastic spool. 

    This time, the embroidery went without any problems. There were no complaints about the quality of the sewing, except at one place. I even inserted bar tack stitches at the beginning and the end of the cord, and understood that the next time I'll better not do it. The quality was utterly disappointing. 

    Whether it was due to my knitting threads being unsuitable for the purpose or the design imperfections, I cannot say. And I want so much to know, where to use this fabled cord! 
    I instantly remembered, even without doing the web search, the embroidery samples of the old past, which can now be found in the museums around the globe. In those days cord was used in applique: it concealed the edge cut. Though it was, of course, done by hand, you can try doing something akin to this on your machine. 
    I've been searching for a suitable design for a considerate time. I perused lots of clipart and settled upon this picture: 

    Inside this intricately shaped thing, I decided to put an applique, the edges of which I would then decorate with a cord. The rest I intended to embroider with satin stitches, partly in the Thread Velvet technique. I had to modify the original design, adding several elements. The resulting design contained almost 32 thousand stitches thanks to the Thread Velvet: 

    Now that the design is ready, all I need to do is to embroider it. I hoop the fabric with the stabilizer: 

    And embroider the outline for the future applique: 

    Then I put the applique material on top: 

    Stitch it to the main fabric with the running stitch, outlining the design at the same time. Then, after the machine makes a stop, however more carefully trim the extra fabric around the edges: 

    Get the piping foot ready, placing it under the needle: 


    Hit the start button and begin sewing cord to the fabric. It'll look like this: 

    This is the cord already sewn along the perimeter of the applique: 

    On one of the photos above you may see that there are missing stitches inside. For that reason, I stopped the embroidery even before sewing the cord, added the missing elements and embroidered all the rest: 

    Some time after that everything is ready: 

    Now little is left — to cut the threads in the satin columns, in order to fray them a bit so that they look like having been done in the Thread Velvet technique. I did this with an ordinary razor blade: 

    The general look of the ready embroidery: 

    The closer look: 


    This experiment suggested to me that the cord looks splendid in combination with any embroidery technique. The design was not difficult to create. The second time I succeeded. The most important thing is to choose the right type of thick twisted thread or cord and correctly adjust the piping foot. 
    Although there were some mistakes. One of them is as follows. In my first version of the design, the applique was to be embroidered last. And only after that, I proceeded to cording. All other elements were embroidered at the very beginning, including the bulky Thread Velvet satin columns. This is how it looked before sewing the cord: 

    When I was cording the edges of my applique, the piping foot shifted a bit every time satin column appeared to in the way. And of course, the groove, into which the cord was inserted, shifted too, so the needle began to hit not the hole in the foot, but the foot instead, and therefore broke. On the photo below I've already changed the needle. 

    I didn't even finish embroidering the first sample. 

    See how thick were my Thread Velvet columns? 
    The summary: you can achieve anything by trial and error. 
    P.S. Cording, part 2

    Placemats with machine embroidery

    Placemats with machine embroidery
    Preparing for a holiday, one must take a number of things into account, such as buying or creating presents, inviting guests, home decoration, etc. To make your table look inviting, you’ll only need several pieces of fabric and a sewing and embroidery machine. Sew the placemats and decorate them with machine embroidery that your guests will love!
    Placemats with machine embroidery. Materials
    Outer fabric Inner fabric Between-lay Tearaway adhesive stabilizer Sewing and embroidery threads Placemats with machine embroidery. Preparations
    Cut the 48x38 cm rectangles out of the outer and inner fabrics, as well as the between-lay material. Put them together in this way: first goes the inner fabric, right side down, then the between-lay, and the upper fabric with its right side up on top of it all. Pin the layers together and draw the straight or diagonal lines with the help of a long ruler.



    Using the walking foot with a guide, stitch the layers together along the lines you’ve just drawn. Start with the centerline, and gradually work your way to the sides.



    Placemats with machine embroidery. Embroidery
    Choose a design from the machine’s memory or download one from our store. When you use designs from your machine’s memory (letters, for example), you can change their size up to 20% directly in the machine. If you are in a mood for creativity, and the machine’s capabilities are not enough, you might want to use PE Design.

    Stick a tearaway adhesive to the wrong side of your fabric. Hoop and run the embroidery. 


    After the machine has finished stitching, unhoop the fabric, and remove the stabilizer leftovers. Cut out the pockets or decorations for your placemat. 


    In order to create a pocket for the cutlery, stitch on the seam allowance. Insert a cardboard pattern and gather the thread. Press the cutout with an iron. 


    Placemats with machine embroidery. Assembling
    The pockets can be sewn on with a straight stitch on the sewing machine or by hand (blind stitch). For the neat edges, use the edge stitch foot.


    The details may be attached by a zigzag stitch or any of the decorative stitches.

    Bias binding is good for the edges. You can cut it from the main fabric or you may use the companion fabric to make your bias binding a part of the decoration. To attach it to the placemat, use the edge stitch foot.


    Placemats are easy to sew, and there is an unlimited number of decorations.


    Original text by Irina Lisitsa

    Heart-shaped scissors holder with embroidery

    Heart-shaped scissors holder with embroidery
    Want to learn how the simplest design, a couple of stitches and tools make a cute item? This tutorial contains a bare minimum of technique, a couple of tips and a step-by-step guide to creating an original scissors holder shaped like a heart. A gift like this will warm the heart of any crafter. And, if you have a really creative sewer/embroiderer for a friend, who owns lots of scissors, you may even give it to them instead of a Valentine. 
    Heart-shaped scissors holder with embroidery. Materials:
    Sole-colored fabric (non-stretchy) Felt (thick) Tearaway adhesive stabilizer Upper embroidery threads Lower embroidery threads Scissors Machine embroidery design
    Heart-shaped scissors holder with embroidery. The making process
    Prepare the necessary materials. Load the design into your embroidery machine and attach the sole-colored fabric to the stabilizer. This will be our front (embroidered) panel.
    I usually prefer a tearaway adhesive, but in this case, a nonadhesive tearaway will do just as good, as will a cutaway stabilizer. If you use the last one, you may leave it in place after embroidery; in that case, you’ll have a strengthened front panel.
    If you’ll choose to make an entire holder out of thick felt, you may spare the stabilizer altogether.
    The next step is to attach the hoop to the embroidery machine and start the embroidery. Home embroidery machine will make stops for a thread change.

    Once the embroidery is finished, unhoop. Leave the stabilizer in place, if you wish.
    On the embroidered fabric, draw a triangle in such a way that the design fits exactly in its center. Keep in mind the size of the scissors, for which the holder is intended. Before cutting the triangle out, decide whether you will fold the edges or not. If yes, don't forget to leave some fabric for seam allowance (or fraying, as shown in this tutorial).

    Pick up a sheet of paper, draw the triangle and then add two half-circles to transform it into a heart. You may skip this part and draw directly on felt. It is easier to draw on paper, so, if you're not an artist (I’m not), do as I did. 

    Press the paper template to the felt and cut the back panel of your holder.

    You’re almost done. The fabric I chose for my front panel frays a bit. I decided not to fold the sides in order to hide the edges. In order to prevent the upper edge from fraying more than it is necessary for decoration, I add a decorative stitch at some distance from it. Now I join the sides with the back panel. I use threads of the same color as the felt.

    One last thing: I pierce a hole on the side and tie the ribbon in a bow. A piercer came with my sewing and embroidery machine. If you do not own one, use a substitute.

    Voila! Your scissors holder is ready!
    Original text by Mary Stratan
    Pick the design you like from our store! https://embroideres.com/ 

    Heart-shaped decoration for a garment

    Heart-shaped decoration for a garment
    A few strips of fabric, a sole-colored T-shirt or a tank top, and 15 minutes of your spare time—that’s all you need to create a heart-shaped decoration. You can use the tips described in this tutorial to decorate any garment, thus giving your old clothes look new and interesting look. Hearts are perhaps most often associated with the Valentine’s Day, but one doesn't need an excuse for wearing them on any other day of the year. Don’t be afraid to experiment! Not only it will help you to revamp your clothes but also give you lots of joy!
    Materials
    A T-shirt Thin silk cording A gathering foot A Ruffler foot A cording foot for sewing on three cords Strips of non-fraying fabric (netting, tulle netting, thin knitwear).
    Heart-shaped decoration for a garment
    On a T-shirt, mark the center front line. Place a heart-shaped cutout on top of it and trace the outline with a piece of tailor’s chalk or a fabric marker. Cut the non-fraying fabric into strips 3 to 6 cm wide.



    Attach the Ruffler foot to your machine. Select the appropriate pleating depth and stitch the strips along the center line, gathering the fabric as you go. If you haven’t yet used the Ruffler foot, here’s the tutorial (coming soon!):
    If you need narrow pleats of the equal width, you can use a gathering foot instead. For instructions, see this tutorial (coming soon!):


    .
    Pin the pleated strip of fabric along the outline of the heart and straight-stitch it to the fabric. You now have a decorated garment!
    After I had slipped my T-shirt over a mannequin, it became clear that I failed to get the measurements right, so I cut the upper part of the pleats a bit, thus making the decoration even more impressive.



    Alternately, you can use knitwear strips and cords. Cut the thin knitwear fabric into strips 3 to 6 cm wide.
    While cutting, pay attention to the wales. They should be vertically oriented: in this way, the fabric edge won’t fray, and there will be no runs.
    Gather the knitwear strips, using the method described above. Trace the future decoration to the fabric. In my case, these are two halves of a heart, to the right and left of the straight line. Pin the gathered knitwear strips along the outline.



    Attach the cording foot and feed three cords into it. Select a three-step zigzag stitch. Stitch the gathered strip to the fabric by the cord.



    On turns and at corners, raise the foot and rotate the fabric under it. Having adjusted the fabric position, pull the cords slightly and continue sewing.



    Original text by Irina Lisitsa
  • Free machine embroidery designs

  • Blog Entries

    • By diver361 in Machine embroidery, digitizing, news, ideas help
         1
      Introduction to Embroidery Blending Colors.
      In this blog we will introduce you to some terminology the you will need to understand to make blends possible. We will also explain the different methods for creating blends in your embroidery software.
      Terminology
      Density The density is a value of how close the stitches are to one another, there are few ways to measure it depending on the units you use. The three units are Stitches Per Inch (spi) Points (pts) Millimeters (mm) the standard is listed below.
      Standard density is 63.5 spi = 4 pts = .4 mm
      Absolute Density Is similar to WYSIWYG the value is a true value. With this option checked your density would be 63.5 spi , if you lower it , 55 spi it will show that. If you do not have this option checked your starting point will be 0 and if you want to go to 55 spi you would have to put in -8.5.
      Traveling lines this is the line that connects part of a fill, often fills will divide at some point and re join you can manipulate this using your start and stop points. These lines often go through the center of the design, their is an option to force the to the outside I recommend using this option when blending fills.
      Blend Tool Depending on your version you may have an option to blend colors this is called the blend tool. This is standard in the TAJIMA Maestro Level
      Density Line Tool In version Tajima DGML by Pulse Version 14 and DG15 depending on the level you may have a icon called density line tool. This allows you to control the embroidery density at different increments of the blend.
      As you may know blending is a technique of layering two or more colors to get an effect of a blend, the digital world has been using blending for years however its not as common in embroidery. There are several different methods of blending that I am aware of. Blending with embroidery threads, or by layering one or more fills over each other. Another way to create an effect of a blend is to use the multimedia approach and add a image or vinyl behind the embroidery., which we covered in past blogs called multimedia designs.
      Blending with Embroidery Threads
      This technique is not new, it has been used in the home embroidery field for hundreds of years, and it allows you to create depth to a design. One option is to blend a heavy thread as a fill and covered by a top layer with a smaller thread. Another way to blend thread types is to have the blue fill going horizontal at 35 spit and the red fill going vertical at 25 spi when you sew them out like this it will blend the two colors creating an illusion of a third color,

      The Irish embroidery design use layers to blend the two colors together to get the effect of a pattern with the leaves, there is a light green background and a dark green layered on top. This technique can be applied to a wide range of designs and works best with similar colors.
      Samples of Blending
      Here are some samples, of types of blending that is available .. you can see the layers when zoomed in but remember the machine embroidery design is only a quarter of that size below.



      Blend Tool ( Maestro Level only )
      For some of us we have a tool that allows us to create blends. This is a great tool for making the sunset fade into the water.. However it can be done manually its rather simple with this tool. Below is the Automatic tool for making blends.
      1. Start a NEW document
      2. With the eclipse tool draw a circle 5 inches

      You could also add greater depth by using two different weights of thread by doing this it will cause the top stitch to sit on top of the bottom stitch.
      3. Convert the circle to a complex fill , right click or CTRL E to bring up the menu to convert too option appears.

      4. Right Click on the fill and choose Auto.. and then select color blend and you will see the following .

      5. Change the above setting to match the image and then click OK to save the settings
      6. Then right click and choose Break up

      Note I change the colors so its visible to blue and orange, as red and orange will be hard to see on the screen.
      There are a couple things I would recommend is
      - High light each segment and goto properties,
      - Goto complex fill effects and change the travelling route to the edge, this will get rid of the lines going through the middle of the embroidery design.

      Tips for embroidery digitizer
      When working with blends they work best on contrasting colors that are closely related to each other, like light blue and dark blue, oranges and reds, orange and yellows, I recommend everyone make a blend and try different densities, angles and colors to experiment with the tools and develop and understanding how it cane be used.
      Author: Frank Prokator
    • By Hunter11 in Machine embroidery, digitizing, news, ideas help
         1
      A question we have been asked many a times on our blog and via our audience. However, we were keen to poll the community and find out exactly which brand you find the best, what better place to do it than here. Please vote on your best embroidery machine and we will update the results to our recent guide to share with our embroidery fanatics!
      Happy Voting!
       
       
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