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  • Plans for organizing an ideal embroidery workspace


    Irina

    Original text by: Marina Belova

    I dream of the times when I bring my embroidery workspace to an order. I want to make the working process comfortable and have everything I need ready to hand. That's why I've been reading on the issue and discovered a lot of interesting information.

    Many words have been written on how to organize your workspace, but here are the things I singled out and to try in the  nearest future.

    I liked the scheme by Frank Gawronsky in the Images magazine depicting how the tables should be arranged for such manipulations as hooping and giving the finishing touches to an item. Doing so will help to minimize the number of steps in your working process.

    Workspace around embroidery machine

    But arranging tables is, of course, not enough. You need to always have the working instruments on them, too. Such as, for example, scissors for trimming away the stabilizer or marking tools or the hooping device — the object of dreams of every embroiderer.

    But what is also important for me is keeping all my threads in one place close to the machine so that they will be easy to find without opening all the boxes in search for the one bobbin you need. So, you need to create a threads database, even it is only a simple one. That is, actually, not so difficult to do.

    Several times I've come across an interesting suggestion: to cut the stabilizer according to the size of your hoop in advance. In my opinion, this recommendation is considerable for mass production, because it saves time which otherwise would be wasted on cutting the stabilizer before every hooping, allowing to simply take the prepared piece. But in my case, which is trying to use as little stabilizer as possible, it is more advantageous to use pieces of stabilizer beyond the size of the hoop. Therefore I just plan to make the stabilizer unreeling device to make the use of stabilizers more practical.

    I also dream of placing a needle change reference guide behind my embroidery machine so that to be sure which needle to use.

    And I also want to write a plan for the scheduled maintenance of my embroidery machine.

    I dream of installing the source of bright light above my workplace at last, to make everything visible so that I don't need to squint when threading a needle.

    One more curious recommendation that I cannot turn into reality is having the right kind of floor under the embroidery machine. Frank Gawronsky writes that the best floor on which the embroidery machine stands is a wooden one.

    I also cannot change the lack of space around my embroidery machine for such needs as thread change, service maintenance and framing (which needs about 90 cm of space around). The good thing is my machine being a compact one that can be moved around on tiny wheels. These wheels make the embroidery machine a bit too high for me, making the thread change not the easiest task either. The bed plate should be no higher than 70—80 cm, and mine is no less that 90.

    But it is possible to put the other things into action.

    After all, the hardest thing is not to have all this, but to bring all things in your workspace to an order so that the tools and threads and devices could be found in their proper places.


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    I am so lucky to have most of the above comments, it has taken about 2 years to get myself comfortable around this space. Have all my tools in plastic basket beside machine, my cutting table is now down to storage size and my laptop is on it. My threads are all in drawers, colour coded, my stabilisers are in arms reach and I have mobile wire drawers which the other day I finally stabilised the timber top with double sided tape and do my hooping there, it is great height, I have room to replace threads comfortably beside the 12 needle Happy, SO, I feel quite comfy and so does the machine. Thanks for your input above, could not find fault in any of your comments :-)

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    On ‎29‎/‎01‎/‎2016 at 9:54 AM, born2sewaust said:

    I am so lucky to have most of the above comments, it has taken about 2 years to get myself comfortable around this space. Have all my tools in plastic basket beside machine, my cutting table is now down to storage size and my laptop is on it. My threads are all in drawers, colour coded, my stabilisers are in arms reach and I have mobile wire drawers which the other day I finally stabilised the timber top with double sided tape and do my hooping there, it is great height, I have room to replace threads comfortably beside the 12 needle Happy, SO, I feel quite comfy and so does the machine. Thanks for your input above, could not find fault in any of your comments :-)

     

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    I just noticed in your comments, about squinting to thread needles. 1. I place piece of white paper behind needle, eye is then visible and 2. there is a channel down front of needle, I cut thread at angle and gentle move it down this channel and it will slip right into the needle. Hope this helps :-)

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    also helpful is a whole page magnifier sheet  very inexpensive about 1 dollar    you can velcro it to machine if need be 

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    On 2/15/2016 at 6:08 PM, born2sewaust said:

    I just noticed in your comments, about squinting to thread needles. 1. I place piece of white paper behind needle, eye is then visible and 2. there is a channel down front of needle, I cut thread at angle and gentle move it down this channel and it will slip right into the needle. Hope this helps :-)

    good tip about sliding the thread down along the shank.  I first have to find my stupid scissors to cut the thread.

    Old timers tip: put your thumbnail of hand not holding the thread behind the needle and just keep it there.Then with your threading hand, bring the tip of the thread to touch the needle somewhere close to the eye. Move back your other thumbnail and it will draw the thread right thru the hole.  I love teaching this to students, they think it is magic. sssshhhh-it is!!!

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    Wonderful essay!!! I have been in the textile industry since forever.  My family has always been  in the "schmatta" business lol. My granduncle died with his boots on, he was a suitmaker in his store somewhere in NYC.  I have a degree in Fasion/ Textile/merchandising, I graduated cum laude! but it took me my whole life to get it at 62 years young. wood floors-yes=warmth, rock steady, spits pins back up to you, keeps dust balls rolling out the door. rolling carts=yes, with drawers yes, never keep threads out in the light, they wii fade etc. Lots of other tips but my eyes are tired.  thank you

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    I used to make wed gowns with crazy long trains. girls wanted them. I had a sturdy church table , added wood supports up top and then fixed on a 4 x 8 sheet of that shiny wall covering that comes in 4 x 8 pieces. Of course my 56" silks hung over, but that was not a problem. I put the rolls on a roll holder at end of table, wood 2x4's and drilled holes in them to hold the roller stick. boy howdy that fabric would fly down the table. It was a cut table and layout, and pattern creation.  My only bad was it was against the wall on the oppposite wall, but I leaned way over and it was fine. I had wooded boards underneath to store long rolls. Threads magazine did include my design in a sewing space utilization. : ))) Now I just pattern make on large dining table, 8 feet by 48". regards

    SheriW

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    You all are WAY above me!  I'm just hopeful to get my spare bedroom/office/craft room/sewing room into a somewhat usable space.  I bought an 8 foot laminate countertop and attached legs to use as my table.  My sewing/embroidery machine, serger and laptop are all on the table along with miscellaneous other supplies.  Cutting table is behind.  The closet has been turned into storage with shelves for fabric and racks to hold thread.  I desperately need some overhead light (I've been known to wear a headlamp for spot lighting when I'm trying to finish a project late at night!!).  Wood floors would be helpful so I'm not losing needles and pins on the carpet.  Oh, and a day of sewing is never complete without a cat or two sitting on the cutting table supervising while I sew!  Great article, keep the ideas coming!

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