Jump to content

Leaderboard


Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 07/07/2019 in Blog Entries

  1. 3 points
    Introduction to Embroidery Blending Colors. In this blog we will introduce you to some terminology the you will need to understand to make blends possible. We will also explain the different methods for creating blends in your embroidery software. Terminology Density The density is a value of how close the stitches are to one another, there are few ways to measure it depending on the units you use. The three units are Stitches Per Inch (spi) Points (pts) Millimeters (mm) the standard is listed below. Standard density is 63.5 spi = 4 pts = .4 mm Absolute Density Is similar to WYSIWYG the value is a true value. With this option checked your density would be 63.5 spi , if you lower it , 55 spi it will show that. If you do not have this option checked your starting point will be 0 and if you want to go to 55 spi you would have to put in -8.5. Traveling lines this is the line that connects part of a fill, often fills will divide at some point and re join you can manipulate this using your start and stop points. These lines often go through the center of the design, their is an option to force the to the outside I recommend using this option when blending fills. Blend Tool Depending on your version you may have an option to blend colors this is called the blend tool. This is standard in the TAJIMA Maestro Level Density Line Tool In version Tajima DGML by Pulse Version 14 and DG15 depending on the level you may have a icon called density line tool. This allows you to control the embroidery density at different increments of the blend. As you may know blending is a technique of layering two or more colors to get an effect of a blend, the digital world has been using blending for years however its not as common in embroidery. There are several different methods of blending that I am aware of. Blending with embroidery threads, or by layering one or more fills over each other. Another way to create an effect of a blend is to use the multimedia approach and add a image or vinyl behind the embroidery., which we covered in past blogs called multimedia designs. Blending with Embroidery Threads This technique is not new, it has been used in the home embroidery field for hundreds of years, and it allows you to create depth to a design. One option is to blend a heavy thread as a fill and covered by a top layer with a smaller thread. Another way to blend thread types is to have the blue fill going horizontal at 35 spit and the red fill going vertical at 25 spi when you sew them out like this it will blend the two colors creating an illusion of a third color, The Irish embroidery design use layers to blend the two colors together to get the effect of a pattern with the leaves, there is a light green background and a dark green layered on top. This technique can be applied to a wide range of designs and works best with similar colors. Samples of Blending Here are some samples, of types of blending that is available .. you can see the layers when zoomed in but remember the machine embroidery design is only a quarter of that size below. Blend Tool ( Maestro Level only ) For some of us we have a tool that allows us to create blends. This is a great tool for making the sunset fade into the water.. However it can be done manually its rather simple with this tool. Below is the Automatic tool for making blends. 1. Start a NEW document 2. With the eclipse tool draw a circle 5 inches You could also add greater depth by using two different weights of thread by doing this it will cause the top stitch to sit on top of the bottom stitch. 3. Convert the circle to a complex fill , right click or CTRL E to bring up the menu to convert too option appears. 4. Right Click on the fill and choose Auto.. and then select color blend and you will see the following . 5. Change the above setting to match the image and then click OK to save the settings 6. Then right click and choose Break up Note I change the colors so its visible to blue and orange, as red and orange will be hard to see on the screen. There are a couple things I would recommend is - High light each segment and goto properties, - Goto complex fill effects and change the travelling route to the edge, this will get rid of the lines going through the middle of the embroidery design. Tips for embroidery digitizer When working with blends they work best on contrasting colors that are closely related to each other, like light blue and dark blue, oranges and reds, orange and yellows, I recommend everyone make a blend and try different densities, angles and colors to experiment with the tools and develop and understanding how it cane be used. Author: Frank Prokator
  2. 1 point
    The present focused market calls for imaginative ways to deal with advancement of custom embroidery services. From imaginative introductions to simple to-explore online web stores to stunning IT administration frameworks, we give our clients the ability to broaden their corporate marking activities and surpass their showcasing objectives. Also, our far reaching request preparing and satisfaction administrations enable them to stay concentrated on their center business while our turnkey operation deals with the difficulties of the advancements and satisfaction business. Considering your alternatives for custom attire, embroidered clothing conveys a fundamental feeling of value that addresses the intuitive of customers and clients, giving a sentiment trust and fulfillment. Advantages of custom embroidery: It gives you a professional appearance. It can be put on a wide assortment of materials. It lasts longer (doesn't wear off like silkscreen paint does). It can be washed easily. Large amount of shades are accessible in it. Some typical examples of custom embroidery embroider clothing are: Hoodies – flexible for a scope of icy climate outside work. Sweatshirts – like hoodies, a sweatshirt is extraordinary to keeping warm and agreeable. Fleeces– Zipped fleeces are a decent hindrance against unforgiving conditions. Shorts – In summer, shorts for men and ladies are accessible to keep cool. Action Trousers – A more down to earth and hard wearing other option to brilliant pants. Body warmers – Another extraordinary expansion to icy climate work.
  3. 1 point
    A question we have been asked many a times on our blog and via our audience. However, we were keen to poll the community and find out exactly which brand you find the best, what better place to do it than here. Please vote on your best embroidery machine and we will update the results to our recent guide to share with our embroidery fanatics! Happy Voting!
  4. 1 point
    When learning to digitize half the battle is knowing how to use the tools and what tools to use to get a desired look. Whether you have a basic digitizing level or the highest level possible if you do not know how to use the different tools you are no further ahead. In this blog we look at using the basic tools, including the RUN tool, satin tool and fill tool. I consider these the most simple of design as your only using one tool. When you get a grasp for this tool then you can start adding additional types of strokes .. If you have a some punching tools usually you will have the most basic of stitch tools in Tajima Pulse they call it a RUN Stitch however its a basic stitch , you place the points and set the stitch length, If you can learn to punch embroidery designs with this you will be able to add more detail with fewer stitches, and if you get good at it you can make a whole embroidery design with no trims. Here is a simple outline of a cat and dog dancing in the rain. You should be able to digitize this embroidery design with just the run tool. I would set the stitch length between .07 and .10 sometimes shorted on smaller detailed areas. The run tool should produce a stitch similar to the one below , basically its gets tacked down by the bobbin embroidery thread at specified by the stitch length,. In the Tajima Pulse branded embroidery software you have another option on some levels it called a manual stitch this allows you to control the stitch length as it makes a stitch when you place each point, this is also known as stitch by stitch digitizing and is considered old school as you have control of each stitch. When looking at the image shown above you need to start at a place and try to finish at another place, If your new to embroidery digitizing I recommend you get in the rabbit of punching from the bottom up, and out from the center, its usually not a problem for left chest design but caps require it to reduce the push of the embroidery design. If you do it on most of your embroidery design it won't seem like a problem when you punch designs for caps and jacket backs. You will see a graph on the image 1 this is how I mark my designs to give me reference lines. Some people can eye ball it with out the lines. Above in image 3 you will see where I have placed my points there is no set way you have to draw it the only thing you have to try to do is to keep the stitch length above .02 inch going smaller sometime will automatically get truncated by the software, Here is what the embroidery stitches look like zoomed in and out images 4 and 5. The smaller the stitch length the sharper the corners and the more detail however it also increase the number of stitches in the design, so generally its a balancing act, Some times you may need to retrace your steps , in order to minimize trims. Take your time, map it out if you can ,and omit any detail that is too small to reproduce, you may also need to place more gaps in between the stitches than what you would need if you were printing this. I recommend at least 1 to 1 1/2 stitch widths. Halfway point of the design Image 6 When your down punching the design Image 7 Now you should be able to compare image 1 and image 7 before and after to see if you like the amount of detail that you have added. Now you can take this design and if you want add some satin or fills to it. Image 8 Or you can go 1 step further and make it a full color designs or leave it at a one color design. If you sew out the outline version no fills, you only need to add underlay to the satin style of stitches, if you add the fills in you will need to add a contour stitch to the fills and a lattice to and add some compensation to the fills and satin stitches, the run style stitches or programmed runs do not need any underlay or compensation. Author: Frank Prokator
  5. 1 point
    Original text by: Katya Ebber Your hoop is not one-size-fits-all. You become acutely aware of it when you need to embroider lace ribbons or edgings. This master-class will tell you how to align machine embroidery designs with lace so that the joining places could not be seen. This master-class shows working in the embroidery design software (creation of the alignment crosses), and also the embroidery process. Preparing the design in Embird Load a chosen machine embroidery design into Embird. Add the alignment stitches and half stitches at the top and the bottom of the design. Copy and flip them vertically. Having added the alignments stitches, change the order of steps in the embroidery, dragging the objects in the objects bar, and also change their color. The main objects should be located between the top and the bottom alignment stitches. Click 'Paste' in the toolbar. In the pop-up list choose 'Basting' and define the stitch length. After you click 'OK' the guide stitch will be added to specify the design's position in the hoop. How to align machine embroidery designs properly Load the prepared design into your embroidery machine and embroider the first color, according to the chart you added in the software. Hoop the water soluble stabilizer and embroider the first design (001). Alignment stitches are embroidered with the last color of the design. They will be used as marks for linking this part of the design with the next. Having embroidered the first design, trim away the water soluble stabilizer near the embroidery. Hoop water soluble stabilizer again and embroider first two colors of the design (the guide stitch and the alignment crosses). Remove the hoop from the machine and add a thin layer of spray adhesive. Using a short pin, join the center marks of the alignment crosses on the embroidery parts and on the water soluble stabilizer. Do the alignment stitches without the thread to check if the hooping went right. If all the crosses and stitches match, begin the embroidery. If the alignment crosses do not match, repeat the alignment process as mentioned above. This method is good for many items where you need to embroider a repetitive pattern. We have embroidered lace today, but if you need to do the edging of the table cloth or curtain, this method will work just as good. Use tearaway non-adhesive stabilizer for fabrics.
  6. 1 point
    This step by step instruction for free machine embroidery design Hardanger is based exactly on the same principle as cutwork. Hoop the fabric together with the water-soluble stabilizer. With the first color, you embroider the outline to mark the area where the holes will be cut. After that, without making a stop (to avoid extra knots), add a zigzag stitch on top of the outline. Having done that, take the hoop off the machine and cut holes in the outlined area, trying not to damage the stabilizer (Image 1). Second color – a laced net is added in place of the cutouts (Image 2). Third color – it's recommended to use the thread of a matching color here in order to create a drawn fabric effect (Image 3). With the fourth and the fifth colors, the design itself is embroidered, ending in a zigzag border. After that, you need to take the hoop off the machine and trim the fabric along the edges of the embroidery without touching the stabilizer (Image 4). Sixth color – a decorative stitch is stitched along the bottom part of the design (Image 5). Seventh color – lastly, the lips, nose and cap are embroidered (Image 6).
  7. 1 point
    Original text by: Marina Belova One would think that evaluating of tension of the thread is such an old chestnut. But no, last week it came as a revelation to me. It is strange that such an essential information is practically non-existent on the internet, whereas manuals only contain the instructions on how to do the most basic things. And it is such a shame, really. So, everybody knows (including me) that after the embroidery has been completed, the backside of a perfect satin-stitch column should look like this: 1/3+1/3+1/3 (upper + under + upper). If the column is divided differently, it means that you need to adjust your upper thread tension or the under-thread tension on your bobbin case. I shall be honest with you, I don't see this ideal picture often, certainly not all the time. Velles 15 is notorious for getting the thread tension wrong, of which I've written many times, and was supported by the others. But there is a problem with the dial itself, which is pretty crude and, consequently, lacks the possibilities the Velles 19 dial has. But no matter how the dial was made, you have to adjust it all the time. The question is, how do you do it? Sometimes it's quite difficult a task to adjust it properly. As it happens, you have to act wisely. First of all, I'll show you the most typical occasion which happens all the time when I use my Velles 15, and which has always puzzled me. These are my real works, not the test pieces: As it turns out, this irregular outcome of the bobbin thread is a mark that something is wrong with a bobbin case. Is it either bent or damaged. To check this just lay the bobbin case with the bobbin inside onto the table or any other flat surface with bobbin facing down. Then pull at the thread, holding the case slightly and allowing the bobbin to uncoil freely. It the thread is not uncoiled smoothly, but jerkily, it is the sign that the bobbin case has been damaged, so that it is not round anymore. Most likely, it was dropped on the floor in the past. I have dropped it, of course, even more that once, but I never thought about the consequences. To cut the long story short, you must have a spare bobbin case. Sometimes the jerking like that cannot be corrected in any other way. And now I'll tell you about two of the most typical examples. a. The under-thread is just barely visible on the underside or not visible at all: In this case you will have to find time to run your machine through all those tension tests at least once to find out what happens with every one of your needles. Here you can also see the perfectly emblematic old photo of the old I-test from the times when I already had huge problems with a bobbin case. It turned out, to my surprise, that there are two ways of adjustment in this situation (this nuance of evaluation of the test results is hardly mentioned at all): • If such is the situation with all or nearly all of your needles, loosen the under-thread tension. • But if this happens only with 2 or 3 needles, tighten the upper thread on them. b. The under-thread on the underside is more than 1/3 column wide): Again, run your machine through all the tests using every needle and see. And again you can get two different results: • If such is the result produced by all the needles, tighten the under-thread tension. • If you get it only with 2 or 3, loosen the upper thread. That is basically all. I didn't know that it was so easy and used to regard thread tension tests with disdain. One should love their embroidery machine and care about it, so that it could reciprocate and minimize the number of unpleasant moment in the course of embroidery. We have so much yet to learn. P.S. A thought just popped in my head: what about single-thread embroidery machines that don't have a lot of needles, which can help you to compare their performance and understand what tension needs to be adjusted? How do you adjust the tension there? Some of my readers suggest buying a special device that helps to adjust upper and under-thread tension. And what do you think?
×
×
  • Create New...