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The Magic of Christmas in your projects

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Loving birds.. Wonderful designs, stitched out beautifully

Really cute, You love this when you stitched it. Would love more of same designs.
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Adorable design. Stitches out beautifully.

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Showing content with the highest reputation since 01/16/2020 in Articles

  1. 3 points
    A guide to sewing a freestyle backpack purse. Beginning Step 1. Let’s sew the straps. We have 4 of those. If you use fabric, fold the pattern No13 right side inside, stitch the sides together, turn right side out and finish the edges with a topstitch. If you use leather or artificial leather, trim allowance on the sides of the pattern No13. Glue the edges on the wrong side and fold them toward the center. Finish the edges with a topstitch. Put the resulting leather/fabric/webbing piece through the metallic frame, thus getting a part of the future strap. Step 2. Sew the straps to the pattern No5, in accordance with the plotted lines painted on it. Step 3. Place the pattern No6 (the lower edge) on top of the pattern No5 (the edge with the straps), and stitch with seam allowance, right sides facing each other. Turn the piece right side out and add do a topstitch along the seam (the seam allowance should be facing the bottom, the straps should be facing the back). Step 4. Now take resulting piece of Step 3, and match up the narrow part of the pattern No5 with the lower edge of the pattern No4, right sides facing each other. Stitch with seam allowance, fold back to the right side and finish with a topstitch along the seam on the side of the pattern No5 (the seam allowance should be facing toward the bottom). Step 5. To the resulting piece of Step 4, attach the edging, in accordance with the plotted lines on the pattern No6. Step 6. Preparing a zipper. Put the parts of the pattern No11 together, their right sides facing each other, so that the short end of the assembly covers a 40 cm long zipper. Stitch with 1 cm seam allowance and then topstitch along the seam. Step 7. Stitch the resulting pieces of Step 5 and Step 6 together, in accordance with the plotted lines. One flange of the zipper is now secured. Step 8. Place two parts of the pattern No7 (canvas) on top of each other, right sides facing each other, and sew along the lower edge with seam allowance. Flip both parts back. Place the resulting piece of Step 7 on the canvas, right sides facing each other, in accordance with the plotted lines. Sew with seam allowance to the edge of the pattern No4 (the assembly with the zipper). ***The beginning and the end of the line of stitching should not overlap the second canvas piece. Step 9. Turn the Pattern No8 right side out. Transfer the center point over onto the zipper tape. Cover it with the second piece of canvas, right sides facing each other, align the centers and the triangular bracings. Baste and stitch with 0.5 seam allowance. Step 10. Patch plate on the front. If you decided to make your patch plate rectangular, fold the edges to the center and do a topstitch along the folding lines. Sew the last pair of straps to the pattern No12. You may shorten these straps as much as possible. Step 11. Sew the resulting piece of Step 10 to the pattern No3. Step 12. Sew the resulting piece of Step 11 to the pattern No9, matching up the centers. Step 13. Now we’re going to sew the short handles. If you're using fabric, fold the parts of the pattern No10, right sides facing each other, and stitch with seam allowance. Turn the whole thing right side out, press it with an iron and do a topstitch along the folding lines. If you're using leather or artificial leather, glue the long sides to a depth of 2 cm. Hem in the seam allowance, then gently tap the folds with a small hammer. Fold the result in half and sew the folded hems together. Add another line of stitching at the same distance, parallel to the first. Round handle: an alternative. To make a round handle, you’ll need a cord, preferably the one that has a core. The circumference of the handle will depend on the diameter of the cord. The point here is to match the diameter of the cord to the inner part of the future handle. The cord should be equal to the pattern No10 in length, minus 2 cm of seam allowance. How to calculate the width of the pattern No10 (the round handle): Measure the diameter of the cord, if unknown. Add 3–5 mm so that is moves freely, and 2 cm allowance on top of that. That will give you get the necessary width. Fold the seam allowance to the wrong side. Glue (if you're using leather) or baste (if you’re using fabric). Match up the folded hems and sew. Using whatever you have at hand, pass the cord through the pattern. This is how I do it. First, I pick up a thick thread and a needle. Having cut 30 cm of the thread, I secure it at the end of the cord, winding it around several times with a needle. I also have a sturdy strand of wire. Folding it in half; I attach the free end of the thread to the bend. Then I pass the wire through my future short handle and draw the end of the cord on the other side. It will take some effort, because there is not too much room inside. It will be an easy journey from here. We now have the straps. Step 14. Sew the result of Step 13 (the short handles) to the short edges of the result of Step 12, right sides facing each other, at a distance of 1.5 cm from the corner. Step 15. Now let’s add our zipper. Fold the pattern No2 in half and put it on top of your main zipper, close to the teeth, but not too close. Sew along the folding line at a distance of 3–5 mm from the edge. If the zipper tape is wide, you may add another line of stitching, parallel to the first. Repeat with the second flange. Be sure to do the reversing to secure the end of the zipper so that it doesn’t pop open. Step 16. Sew the resulting piece of Step 15 to the even edge of the pattern No1 (made of outer fabric), right sides together. Repeat with the second part of pattern No1. Step 17. If you’re making a bag out of fabric, baste the resulting piece of the Step 14 to the resulting piece of the pattern 16, right sides together, at a distance of 1.5 cm from the upper edge of the pattern No1. Later this assembly will be stitched to the upper edge of the body of the bag. In order to make a beautiful even seam, use the markings on the pattern No1 that correspond to the markings on the bottom part of the resulting piece of Step 14. Do not sew the upper edges of the lining to the upper end of the body! Stitch the basted edges with seam allowance. Thus we get the future upper part of the backpack. Step 18. Put the two parts of the pattern No8 together, right sides facing each other, and stitch along the upper and lower edges. Turn right side out through the open sides. If you decided to make two pockets, repeat this last step with the second part of the pattern No8. Iron out the pocket edges. Step 19. Sew the resulting piece of Step 18 to the pattern No6, in accordance with the plotted lines. Sew or baste the sides, fixing them in place. Stitch along bottom folding line, thus attaching the lower part of the pocket. Or, you may stitch the pocket in one go: first the right side, then the bottom, and then the left. Step 20. Now, the lining for the body of your bag. Align the resulting piece of Step 19 and the pattern No9, and sew with seam allowance along the shorter edge, right sides facing each other. Press the seam allowance open. Step 21. Sew the result of the Step 20 with the pattern N1 (the lining), at a distance of 1.5 cm from the upper corner of that pattern. Leave an opening for turning your backpack right side out. Step 22. Unzip. Align the upper edges of the result of Step 21 (right side) to the upper edges of the resulting piece of Step 17 (wrong side). Sew with seam allowance. Step 23. Tuck the outer part of the bag into the lining. Do not turn the whole thing right side out yet. Align the open side edges of the lining and the zipper. Make sure that the edges of the inside and outside parts of the bag align. Sew with seam allowance. Step 24. Turn the backpack right side out through the opening in the lining. Tuck the lining into the backpack and check all of the seams for defects. All good? Then stitch the opening in the lining with a blind stitch. Step 25. Now let’s prepare the lower parts of the straps. Use the technique from step 13. We sewed the short handles there. Step 26. Slide on the strap adjusters. Detachable straps. Stitch the strap ends. Non-detachable straps. Pass the strap ends through the openings in the front part of the backpack and sew. Pass the other ends through the openings on the back (the ones on the straps) and then once more through the strap length adjusters, so as to form a second lover loop. Sewing the edge of the shoulder straps. P.S. If you find any part of the tutorial difficult, feel free to write a comment, and we’ll try to help. Please share the photos of your backpacks with us; we’ll be happy to add them to our Gallery! We’ll be happy to see your creations!
  2. 2 points
    Sewing tutorial: an eco-friendly bag with a Rooster This is another one of the tutorials presented at the Mlyn exhibition in Minsk. In this tutorial, I’ll show you how to sew an eco-friendly bag with a reverse appliqué (Rooster). And not just a simple appliqué, but a quilted one, too. Sewing a Rooster eco bag. Materials: Unbleached linen fabric For the bag: 2 pieces, 30 x 35 cm each For the handles: 2 pieces, 7 x 60 cm each (or 1 piece, 7 x120 cm) For the lining: 2 pieces of calico, 32 x 30 cm plus 1 piece, 18 x 18 cm – for the pocket Colored strips of fabric 24 cm long for the appliqué (the width may vary: 2.5 or 3 or 3.5 cm) Sewing threads, erasable pen, zigzag scissors. Sewing a Rooster eco-friendly bag. The working process: For the decoration, we’ll be using a raw edge reverse appliqué. You can use any outline drawing of a rooster size 20 x 20 cm. Print it and cut out the pattern. Stitch the strips of fabric together to make a quilt: one after the other, alternating between different colors, until you get a piece 24 x 24 cm in size. Place the front part of your bag on top of the quilt and secure it with pins. Trace the design onto the fabric with an erasable pen. Make sure that the design isn’t bigger than the quilted area. Sew along the outline with a decorative stitch. Using your zigzag scissors, make a hole in the outlined area and cut it close to the outline. Use the resulting piece to create your eco-bag. Original text by Olga Milovanova
  3. 1 point
    How open file you can read here For example, used he design of Fashion teddy bear design from our embroidery library. The format is chosen arbitrarily. Open the design you want to resize. Click on Upscale design. Increase the size of your design either by percent or by a certain number of cm. (I added 10%). Press OK. As you can see in the lower left corner of the window, your design is now bigger than it was, but the number of stitches remains the same. This means that the embroidery may look a bit bald when finished. And we don’t know that, do we? Press Ctrl + A to select the entire design. Ultimately, left-click on any part of the background and drag to enclose the entire design. You’ll see a rectangular frame around it. Now, go to Stitches > Auto Density > Apply. My Editor has automatically added the stitches in the required places. You can see that your stitch count went up. All that is left is to store your design where you want it on your computer.
  4. 1 point
    Embroidered napkins are the classic decoration of a modern house. They easily fit into the interior of any living room or kitchen. If you have an embroidery machine and free time, you can make it yourself. It is needed sometimes to process the edge of a fabric beautifully. There are a lot of creative methods to do this and we will consider one in the master-class: lace making on the edge of a items. One may decorate a dining cotton napkin, a handkerchief or any other items this way. There is a plenty of machine embroidery designs in FSL technique, choose the one you prefer for your items. Such patterns can be easily found in our embroidery design library. Materials which you need for work: Water soluble machine embroidery stabilizer (interlining). Our recommendation Avalon. Adhesive spray of a temporary fixation Sulky or GUNOLD KK100 Top thread for machine embroidery (any brand) - we using Robison Anton Lower thread for machine embroidery or bobbins Fabric for the napkin Processing of lace on the edge of a embroidered item: Fix the water soluble stabilizer in the hoop. Download the embroidery design to the your machine (or save to USB stick or special memory card). Start the embroidery processing. The first stitching would mark where to layout the edge of the tissue on the stabilizer. Apply a layer of the adhesive spray on the stabilizer. Glue the tissue by markup and repeat the stitching of the first thread color, this would fix the tissue on the stabilizer. Then keep on embroidering the lace part of the napkin. The embroidery would be on the edge and on the corner, if you combined the machine embroidery design in a special editing software (My Editor, Embird, Brother Pe-DEsign, Wilcom TrueSizer, Buzz Tools and etc.). The processing of the other parts of the napkin would be repeated with connection. Fix the water soluble stabilizer in the hoop again and embroider the first color of the pattern. Fasten the second corner of the napkin on the stabilizer. Repeat the process of embroidering the design on the edge round the napkin. Cut off the stabilizer close to the edge of the embroidery. Rinse the embroidered napkin with the lace edge in plenty of warm water at the end of work. Napkin ready. In the same way you can arrange a tablecloth or a handkerchief.
  5. 1 point
    Should you ask me 5 or 7 years ago, what are the main points when choosing an embroidery machine, I would undoubtedly say, “The size of the machine frame and your wallet.” Today I will answer, “Look at the what the machine can do!” Contemporary home embroidery machines are reaching their limit as regards the hoop/frame size. You cannot infinitely enlarge the embroidery area and stay affordable for the majority of people. You need to find other ways. One of those is to add to the machine’s functionality. Pinpoint Placement, the perfect alignment of the parts of the embroidery, is exactly what an embroiderer needs. No size limit. Split up – Position – Go! Pinpoint: Perfect alignment Hi friends! Should you ask me 5 or 7 years ago, what are the main points when choosing an embroidery machine, I would undoubtedly say, “The size of the machine frame and your wallet.” Today I will answer, “Look at the what the machine can do!” Contemporary home embroidery machines are reaching their limit as regards the hoop/frame size. You cannot infinitely enlarge the embroidery area and stay affordable for the majority of people. You need to find other ways. One of those is to add to the machine’s functionality. Pinpoint Placement, the perfect alignment of the parts of the embroidery, is exactly what an embroiderer needs. No size limit. Split up – Position – Go! This information is meant for those who are planning to buy or have already bought a Bernina sewing and embroidery machine, but hasn’t yet explored all its capabilities. Today we’ll talk about a Pinpoint Placement option that allows you to position the design on a garment with accuracy to one mm, and also to align different parts of the pattern and embroider designs several times larger than your hoop. The most perfect examples are the border designs, replicated again and again. Pinpoint Placement is an option available in some Bernina models: Embroidery machines: Bernina 700, Bernina 500; Sewing and embroidery machines: Bernina 590, Bernina 790 Plus, and Bernina 880 Plus. This is how it’s done. You decide where on the garment you’ll place the future embroidery. With chalk or a marker, draw two positioning points. Now hoop the garment not bothering about the exact placement. The main thing is to match the size of your design with the embroidery area. Then the magic starts. You pick the necessary design in your machine. Touch the PinPoint button, then activate the Grid and choose two of the nine positioning dots. You will align the needle with the chosen positioning points. To do this, rotate the Multifunction Knobs until the needle will be in the right position, directly above your mark. Fix the position by touching Set. Now, let’s align the needle with another of our two dots. Choose the other one of our two points and rotate the Multifunction Knobs until the needle will be right above the mark on the garment. Done. Now you can do the embroidery. There is also free point positioning. Here you mark a random spot on your garment, touch the right spot on the design, rotate the Multifunction Knobs until the needle is directly above the mark. Then repeat with the second positioning dot.
  6. 1 point
    Original text by Marina Belova Synthetic satin (polyester or acetate) is for some reason considered a rather tricky fabric, prone for puckering and other embroidery distortions, the one that does not tolerate any mistakes. So I decided to check if that was indeed so and why: to me, the fabric seems quite stable and not likely to present any problems. Except that it is very smooth and able to slip out of the hoop; there also can be hoop marks, like on silk or organza. But first, let's see some general recommendations on working with this fabric: When choosing the image or digitizing the design you should not forget to lower the density (0.45–0.5 mm would be OK). Understitching should be kept to a minimum. Although, in you ask my opinion, sparing the underlay seems strange for such a slippery fabric. Satin and filling stitches should not be over 3–4 mm in length. It is important to stick to the embroidery sequence (from the center onward). In order to avoid gaps, filled objects should be embroidered in one direction and not in multiple crossing ones. Read more about it in my article about digitizing complex shapes. The fabric should be hooped together with the stabilizer, trying to keep their contact to a minimum; also, don't forget to wrap the hoop in the fabric or paper prior to that. The stabilizer should be of a tear-away middleweight variety. Or, you can use an adhesive stabilizer like Filmoplast + an additional tear-away stabilizer under the hoop to avoid hooping the satin. Any kind of threads can be used, but everyone seems to prefer rayon. Needles should correspond in thickness to the thread and the fabric. SES light and round needlepoint is preferable. I created a flower design and embroidered it on the satin. The result, in my eyes, is very good: That is, despite the rather dense fill, all puckering and distortion were easily removed with an iron. There was no hoop burn whatsoever on any of these satin pieces. A slightly visible ring on the fabric was easily ironed out in both cases: I probably didn't problems with this because I usually wrap the smaller ring of the hoop in order to prevent the fabric from slipping. About this and other little things that make hooping more easy and efficient, read my article called "Hooping minutiae". The only embroidery defect I saw was shifting of the fibers along the perimeter (which is not a rare occurrence). The embroidery being dense, this defect is visible, but it doesn't bother me: I also want to point out that the design of a lower stitch density, embroidered on the same fabric, puckered as well. But, again, it is not a big problem and can be removed by washing and ironing: I think, this fabric is nothing to be afraid of. I used the ordinary threads and #70-75 needles with SES needlepoint present on my machine. And one layer of 40 g tear-away stabilizer. But I added temporary spray adhesive because I thought that my fabric, a very fluid one, needed it. I didn't use any additional fabric or paper between the rings, and the front side of the satin touched the hoop. I digitized the design as usual, except lowering the density in the fills. The resulting density was 15–20% lower than the default one in my embroidery editor. And it is usually set at 5 lines per mm (~ 0.4 mm). To prevent the fabric showing through the stitches, I added density to the underlay. The bottom line is, the more I embroider on different fabrics, the more intuitive I get considering both the digitizing and embroidery processes.
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