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Beautiful design, Morning owl look amazing.

This embroidery work up perfectly and stitch out nicely. 
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Excellent stitches and original style

Stitched out beautifully! Looked amazing and no issues!
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Loving birds.. Wonderful designs, stitched out beautifully

Really cute, You love this when you stitched it. Would love more of same designs.
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Our designs looks great

Stitched out beautifully! Wonderful decoration!
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Adorable design. Stitches out beautifully.

"Thanks so much for this design It's lovely and stitched out beautifully on leather."
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Showing content with the highest reputation since 09/14/2019 in Articles

  1. 2 points
    Original text by: Marina Belova A few day ago I decided to practice cord embroidery, hence I have the required equipment. Without further ado, I chose the simplest possible design from the old Briggs’ Patent collection, which was originally intended for embroidery with cord or ribbon. Here it is: I digitized the design with a simple running stitch using the same methods as described in my previous article on cord embroidery. Below is the preview of my design: So I started the embroidery. Before pressing the start button I inserted the newly bought silk cord 3 mm wide and set the piping foot in a required way. The cord was of an appropriate size and could fit into the biggest groove under the piping foot on my machine. But something went wrong. I stopped the whole process, soon after having started. The cord turned out to be too tightly woven, and the thread kept breaking. As I didn't have any monofilament yarn, I tried to sew it with ordinary polyester thread. And I didn't like the result in the least. I chose one of my knitting threads — soft cotton one, made of several twisted fibers, and wound it instead of the cord on the same plastic spool. This time, the embroidery went without any problems. There were no complaints about the quality of the sewing, except at one place. I even inserted bar tack stitches at the beginning and the end of the cord, and understood that the next time I'll better not do it. The quality was utterly disappointing. Whether it was due to my knitting threads being unsuitable for the purpose or the design imperfections, I cannot say. And I want so much to know, where to use this fabled cord! I instantly remembered, even without doing the web search, the embroidery samples of the old past, which can now be found in the museums around the globe. In those days cord was used in applique: it concealed the edge cut. Though it was, of course, done by hand, you can try doing something akin to this on your machine. I've been searching for a suitable design for a considerate time. I perused lots of clipart and settled upon this picture: Inside this intricately shaped thing, I decided to put an applique, the edges of which I would then decorate with a cord. The rest I intended to embroider with satin stitches, partly in the Thread Velvet technique. I had to modify the original design, adding several elements. The resulting design contained almost 32 thousand stitches thanks to the Thread Velvet: Now that the design is ready, all I need to do is to embroider it. I hoop the fabric with the stabilizer: And embroider the outline for the future applique: Then I put the applique material on top: Stitch it to the main fabric with the running stitch, outlining the design at the same time. Then, after the machine makes a stop, however more carefully trim the extra fabric around the edges: Get the piping foot ready, placing it under the needle: Hit the start button and begin sewing cord to the fabric. It'll look like this: This is the cord already sewn along the perimeter of the applique: On one of the photos above you may see that there are missing stitches inside. For that reason, I stopped the embroidery even before sewing the cord, added the missing elements and embroidered all the rest: Some time after that everything is ready: Now little is left — to cut the threads in the satin columns, in order to fray them a bit so that they look like having been done in the Thread Velvet technique. I did this with an ordinary razor blade: The general look of the ready embroidery: The closer look: This experiment suggested to me that the cord looks splendid in combination with any embroidery technique. The design was not difficult to create. The second time I succeeded. The most important thing is to choose the right type of thick twisted thread or cord and correctly adjust the piping foot. Although there were some mistakes. One of them is as follows. In my first version of the design, the applique was to be embroidered last. And only after that, I proceeded to cording. All other elements were embroidered at the very beginning, including the bulky Thread Velvet satin columns. This is how it looked before sewing the cord: When I was cording the edges of my applique, the piping foot shifted a bit every time satin column appeared to in the way. And of course, the groove, into which the cord was inserted, shifted too, so the needle began to hit not the hole in the foot, but the foot instead, and therefore broke. On the photo below I've already changed the needle. I didn't even finish embroidering the first sample. See how thick were my Thread Velvet columns? The summary: you can achieve anything by trial and error. P.S. Cording, part 2
  2. 1 point
    Placemats with machine embroidery Preparing for a holiday, one must take a number of things into account, such as buying or creating presents, inviting guests, home decoration, etc. To make your table look inviting, you’ll only need several pieces of fabric and a sewing and embroidery machine. Sew the placemats and decorate them with machine embroidery that your guests will love! Placemats with machine embroidery. Materials Outer fabric Inner fabric Between-lay Tearaway adhesive stabilizer Sewing and embroidery threads Placemats with machine embroidery. Preparations Cut the 48x38 cm rectangles out of the outer and inner fabrics, as well as the between-lay material. Put them together in this way: first goes the inner fabric, right side down, then the between-lay, and the upper fabric with its right side up on top of it all. Pin the layers together and draw the straight or diagonal lines with the help of a long ruler. Using the walking foot with a guide, stitch the layers together along the lines you’ve just drawn. Start with the centerline, and gradually work your way to the sides. Placemats with machine embroidery. Embroidery Choose a design from the machine’s memory or download one from our store. When you use designs from your machine’s memory (letters, for example), you can change their size up to 20% directly in the machine. If you are in a mood for creativity, and the machine’s capabilities are not enough, you might want to use PE Design. Stick a tearaway adhesive to the wrong side of your fabric. Hoop and run the embroidery. After the machine has finished stitching, unhoop the fabric, and remove the stabilizer leftovers. Cut out the pockets or decorations for your placemat. In order to create a pocket for the cutlery, stitch on the seam allowance. Insert a cardboard pattern and gather the thread. Press the cutout with an iron. Placemats with machine embroidery. Assembling The pockets can be sewn on with a straight stitch on the sewing machine or by hand (blind stitch). For the neat edges, use the edge stitch foot. The details may be attached by a zigzag stitch or any of the decorative stitches. Bias binding is good for the edges. You can cut it from the main fabric or you may use the companion fabric to make your bias binding a part of the decoration. To attach it to the placemat, use the edge stitch foot. Placemats are easy to sew, and there is an unlimited number of decorations. Original text by Irina Lisitsa
  3. 1 point
    Heart-shaped decoration for a garment A few strips of fabric, a sole-colored T-shirt or a tank top, and 15 minutes of your spare time—that’s all you need to create a heart-shaped decoration. You can use the tips described in this tutorial to decorate any garment, thus giving your old clothes look new and interesting look. Hearts are perhaps most often associated with the Valentine’s Day, but one doesn't need an excuse for wearing them on any other day of the year. Don’t be afraid to experiment! Not only it will help you to revamp your clothes but also give you lots of joy! Materials A T-shirt Thin silk cording A gathering foot A Ruffler foot A cording foot for sewing on three cords Strips of non-fraying fabric (netting, tulle netting, thin knitwear). Heart-shaped decoration for a garment On a T-shirt, mark the center front line. Place a heart-shaped cutout on top of it and trace the outline with a piece of tailor’s chalk or a fabric marker. Cut the non-fraying fabric into strips 3 to 6 cm wide. Attach the Ruffler foot to your machine. Select the appropriate pleating depth and stitch the strips along the center line, gathering the fabric as you go. If you haven’t yet used the Ruffler foot, here’s the tutorial (coming soon!): If you need narrow pleats of the equal width, you can use a gathering foot instead. For instructions, see this tutorial (coming soon!): . Pin the pleated strip of fabric along the outline of the heart and straight-stitch it to the fabric. You now have a decorated garment! After I had slipped my T-shirt over a mannequin, it became clear that I failed to get the measurements right, so I cut the upper part of the pleats a bit, thus making the decoration even more impressive. Alternately, you can use knitwear strips and cords. Cut the thin knitwear fabric into strips 3 to 6 cm wide. While cutting, pay attention to the wales. They should be vertically oriented: in this way, the fabric edge won’t fray, and there will be no runs. Gather the knitwear strips, using the method described above. Trace the future decoration to the fabric. In my case, these are two halves of a heart, to the right and left of the straight line. Pin the gathered knitwear strips along the outline. Attach the cording foot and feed three cords into it. Select a three-step zigzag stitch. Stitch the gathered strip to the fabric by the cord. On turns and at corners, raise the foot and rotate the fabric under it. Having adjusted the fabric position, pull the cords slightly and continue sewing. Original text by Irina Lisitsa
  4. 1 point
    Sewing toys: a machine embroidered soft ball It is relatively easy to sew a child’s toy: there are a lot of patterns on the Web. If you have an embroidery machine, you can decorate the toy with the monogram with the child’s initials, the name of his or her favorite group or sports team. There are tons of possible variants. Read this tutorial and learn how to assemble a soft ball from appliqué panels. Sewing toys: materials Machine embroidery design Felt 2 mm thick, 3 colors Tearaway nonadhesive stabilizer Upper thread Underthread Sewing toys: sewing order Load the design into your embroidery or sewing and embroidery machine. Hoop a nonadhesive tearaway stabilizer, attach it to the embroidery machine and embroider the first line, which will serve as a guide for positioning your felt panels. After that, the machine will stop and you will place your felt panels of different colors onto the stabilizer. I've conceived a two-color soft ball. The stitchline of the next color will join the felt and the stabilizer, and the one after that will serve as a guide for the manual sewing of the panels. Depending on the design you've chosen (mine is appliqué), you’ll need to change the upper thread color. In appliqué, the layers are sewn on one after the other. In this case, it’s yellow, like the future logo background. Having sewn on the detail of your future appliqué, trim the edge with sharp scissors. After that, you embroider the appliqué panel. On another panel of my ball, I’ve decided to place a child’s initial. For this, I used the character sets from the Brother Innov-is LE memory. I enlarged the letter using the resize option. All manipulations with letters should be performed before the embroidery starts, in the Embroidery Edit mode! Having finished the embroidery, remove the leftovers of your tearaway from the panels and cut them, leaving 0.5 to 1 cm allowance. Sew the details like a biscornu pincushion (translator's note: a tutorial will be added in the nearest future!) Visit our store for an Embroidery library of logos! Original text by Irina Lisitsa
  5. 1 point
    Original text by Marina Belova I decided to try cord embroidery and digitizing for it on my embroidery machine. I have a cording device but has so far been standing idle; I should start using it. The only thing I lack to begin practicing is the cord winded on plastic spools. But I just looked it up on the internet – it won't be hard to purchase one. When I buy it, I'll write a separate article on how to use cord in the field, so to speak. As for today, I decided to sift through the mass of material on cording and digitizing designs with a cord that has accumulated in the course of time. The big plus of cord embroidery is high productivity level. Also, if one uses imagination, amazing designs can be created by combining traditional embroidery techniques with cording. I saw some examples in Bonnie Nielsen's book Punch and also in the photos on the Internet. The cord is commonly used for creating lines and rarely for the fills. Classically, cord is used in flowers, spirals, and alphabets. The outer look of the embroidery with a cord has a splendid 3D effect to it. I've tried cord embroidery once 5 years ago. Then I was inventing the wheel and made quite a few of test pieces. The biggest problem was to buy a right kind of cord. Therefore, I had to buy various threads in a shop that sold knitting paraphernalia, rewind them manually and combine them with various machine settings. This method is only good for those who have a lot of spare time and enthusiasm. That's because it's full of riddles and puzzles. In those days there was no knowledge on how to work with all that. As it turned out later, cord embroidery is simple: Insert the cord into a special device on your embroidery machine (the way of doing so depends on the machine's brand). Position the foot. Embroider the design. I've seen contradictory recommendations on the machine's speed – some people think that it should be lowered to almost 400 rpm, and some believe that you can work at the usual speed. If I'm not mistaken, the speed depends on the embroidery machine. In the end of the embroidery, the cord is cut by hand. Ways of finishing the cord ends: Tuck the ends of the cord to the wrong side so that they don't stick out. They can be hidden under the embroidery. The cord ends also can be secured with a zigzag or satins. There are numerous types of cords in use. Braided cords embroider well, as do the twisted ones. But where the cord bends to a small radius, the yarns may unravel. A cording device can be configured to do loop embroidery, which creates a wonderful 3D effect, especially in large areas. Loop embroidery of an area of an equal size consumes much less time. This method of cording is often used for hair, fur, leaves and so on imitation. With some practice, loop embroidery with a cord on an ordinary embroidery machine can be as effective on one of special loop stitch devices. Hence, there is a room for improvement. A monofilament yarn (fishing twine) is commonly used because it is transparent and will suit any cord. But, in my opinion, an ordinary polyester embroidery thread can be used for soft cords. Digitizing for cord embroidery is not difficult either. But choosing of the design is a task that requires diligence. The entire design is digitized with running stitches. The recommended stitch length is 1–2 mm. Reduce the stitch length on bends in order for them to fit the curve. The design should have 1 start and 1 end point and no trims. You should get a line, drawn as if in one stroke on a pen. Get rid of the tie-offs. Avoid sharp angles, repeats, superimposition, sharp turns – everything should be smooth and flowing. Although, now, after having practiced cording embroidery, I would call that last one quite a disputable statement. The machine should make a stop before and after cord embroidery as the cording device is adjusted, prepared and removed manually. P.S. I already posted an article about me practicing cord embroidery.
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