Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'hooping'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Embroidery designs
    • Embroideres.com designs
    • Free embroidery designs links and download
    • New embroidery designs suggestions
    • Partie francophone
  • Materials for machine embroidery
    • Thread and Stabilizer
  • Embroidery technique
    • Embroidery technique sewing experience
    • Rhinestone designs
    • My sewing room
  • Embroidery software
    • Wilcom software
    • Tajima Pulse software
    • Free, trial and very cheap machine embroidery software
    • Husqvarna/PFAFF embroidery software.
    • Brother embroidery digitizing software
    • Sierra Embroidery software
    • Embroidery Software for Mac
    • Wings XP
  • Logotypes
    • Sport embroidery logos
    • New embroidery logo suggestions
    • Auto and moto logotypes
    • College and University logos
    • Food and Drink logos
    • Fashion and Apparel logotypes
    • Military logotypes and symbols
    • Entertainment industry logotypes embroidery designs
  • Embroidery machines
    • Questions and Answers about embroidery machines
  • Support
    • Questions and Answers
    • Translation of the forum into other languages
  • Electronic magazines, books and patterns
    • Magazines

Blogs

  • Русский блог о машинной вышивке
  • Marina Belova's Blog
  • Machine embroidery, digitizing, news, ideas help
  • Embroideres com: tips.

Categories

  • Animals
  • Applique
  • Auto and Moto
  • Angels and fairies
  • Baby and newborn
  • Birds
  • Cartoon
  • Christmas
  • Cross stitch
  • Decoration
  • Easter
  • Equipment
  • Ethnic
  • Flowers
  • Fruits and Vegetables
  • Heraldry
  • Oriental
  • Insects
  • Kitchen and Cooking
  • Labels and letters
  • Lace and FSL
  • Landscape and Nature
  • Military
  • Photo stitch
  • Project
  • Redwork
  • Religion
  • Sea theme
  • Sport
  • Style
  • Tribal
  • Wilcom elements
  • Woman and Girl
  • Valentine's Day
  • Zodiac Signs
  • Free embroidery software
  • Sewing materials instructions and guide
  • Embroidery software documentation
  • Comunity embroidery designs shop
  • Magazine and Articles
  • Cross stitch designs
    • Pattern Maker cross stitch files
    • X stitch cross stitch designs
    • Embird cross stitch designs

Categories

  • Machine embroidery materials and technology
  • Machine embroidery digitiizng
  • Master Classes

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


AIM


MSN


Website URL


ICQ


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Location


Interests

Found 8 results

  1. How to embroider small items of clothing. Hooping tricks Whenever there is a need to embroider small items of clothing, such as future pockets or cuffs, and your machine only has one hoop, these hooping tricks will do the job. There are several ways of hooping a small item, and in this article, I’m describing two of them. Either one will get you a beautiful high-quality embroidery. The first way of hooping a small item is to glue it to the tear-away adhesive stabilizer. Just what you need for not-too-heavy designs and small monograms. Adhere the item to the stabilizer and hoop in the usual way; the adhesive will secure the fabric in place and prevent shifting during the embroidery. The second way is to hoop the fabric itself. Suitable for smaller and bigger items alike. This is called the fabric extension method. You’ll need a few strips of extra fabric (calico, for example). Stitch them to the main fabric with a straight stitch about 5 mm long. After that, it is advisable to press seams with an iron to make them flatter. Adhere the stabilizer to the wrong side and hoop the item. If you're an owner of a Brother Innov-is le sewing and embroidery machine, you can use the built-in camera for the exact positioning of the design. This is very handy whenever the accurate placement of the design is crucial, such as while working with checkered or striped fabrics. How to use the built-in camera Press the Fabric scan key to view the location of the pressing foot on the LCD screen. Pick one of the positioning stickers that come with the machine and affix it within the embroidery field specified by the machine. Take away the sticker and your hands and wait for the machine to perform the scan. Now the pattern can be viewed in the Embroidery Edit screen, allowing for the better positioning of the design on the hooped item. When the embroidery is finished, remove the stabilizer leftovers or rip off the extra strips of fabric and iron the item on a soft underlay, right side down. Original text by Irina Lisitsa Don't forget to buy some lightweight designs from our store! See also:
  2. Hooping the fabric without hooping Practically any new technique is born in the course of creation. Again and again, we conjure out new techniques that make our production time shorter and our coffee breaks longer. The hooping method I’m going to describe in this article was suggested to me by one of the Broidery.ru forum first members. And, just like in the Broken Telephone game, while passing hands the concept changed somewhat, though I tried to stick to the original one. Sergei Demin, who inspired me, endorsed my version and promised to elaborate on the original idea in the nearest future. Before you start reading, I’d like to tell you in what cases this wonderful little technique might come in handy: Use it to embroider a large number of the same size designs. It will save you a lot of time. If your fabric is of a lightweight and delicate kind, this method will allow you to forego the hooping part. If you do not own a small hoop, and for a larger one the piece to be embroidered is too tiny, this method will spare you sewing on additional strips of fabric in order to enlarge it. You understand, no doubt, that I’ve covered only the basic rules here — it is for you, dear reader, to expand upon them! So, happy hooping without hooping! The work order You’ll need a piece of polyethylene a little larger than your hoop, double-sided painter’s tape, and the hoop. Hoop the polyethylene. Better pick plastic sheeting they use for covering greenhouses: it is dense enough and doesn't warp (almost). Stick the painter’s tape to the inner side of the hoop. After that, unpeel the protective layer. Stick another layer of tape on top of the first. Determine the size of the embroidery area. Then, cut the hole with 5 mm allowance. Choose an appropriate stabilizer and attach it to the wrong side of the fabric. Place the fabric on the prepared surface and start the embroidery. Having finished, remove the embroidered piece of fabric and replace it with the new one. Continue the embroidery. In order to determine the size of the embroidery area, attach the taped hoop to the machine. Load the design and observe the embroidery area on your display. The machine will determine the boundaries of the design and move the needle bar to outline the perimeter, making short stops at the corners. When the needle is directly above the corner, drop it to make a puncture in the polyethylene sheet with the painter’s tape attached to it. Raise it, and the machine will continue the demonstration. Having found the 4 corner points, you’ll draw a rectangle without difficulty. After that, cut the hole the size of the embroidery area with 5 mm allowance. Keep in mind that the sticky side of the tape should hold the fabric in place, and therefore, this method may not be suitable for the designs almost as big as the hoop. Use the sticky hoop until the adhesive tape fails to hold the fabric in place. Idea by Sergei Demin See also:
  3. Master-class by: Irina Lisitsa Dense adhesive water soluble stabilizer is your first helper when it comes to embroidering lace and working with delicate fabrics: chiffon, organza, thin knitwear etc. A new machine embroidery stabilizer Solufix is different from the water soluble stabilizer we know, because of an additional layer of adhesive. It helps working with materials that cannot be hooped and also can be easily removed afterwords. An adhesive layer of Solufix secures the fabric while the embroidery process, and the water soluble part goes off by rinse with a warm water once the embroidery is completed. In this master-class I'll show you how to hoop a water soluble stabilizer Solufix. Materials: Adhesive water soluble stabilizer Marker Scissors Hoop Fabric Place the hoop onto the stabilizer and mark the outer edges with a little allowance. Link the marks with the lines. Cut the stabilizer along the lines you just draw. Put the stabilizer onto the outer ring of the hoop with the paper layer on top. Press the stabilizer into the hoop slightly. Put the inner ring on the top of it and press it inside to secure the stabilizer. Using your template, mark the edges of your embroidery area. Take the template off. Link all the marks together. With the sharp edge of the scissors cut only the paper layer of your stabilizer. Remove the paper layer. Stick your stabilizer onto the fabric. There can be one or two layers of different size. Now the fabric is secured with the stabilizer, and you may proceed with your embroidery.
  4. Master-class by: Irina Lisitsa Beginner owners of embroidery machines are at a loss when overlooking the vast majority of stabilizers. This series of master-classes will teach you the basic rules of hooping of various types of stabilizers. After having read this you will be able to hoop an adhesive stabilizer (Filmoplast) in the right way. This type of stabilizer allows you to secure fabric with a layer of adhesive. Works good for fabrics of high and medium density, and also fabrics that cannot be hooped, like leather, chamois and coated materials. How to hoop Filmoplast We will need: Hoop Filmoplast stabilizer Marker Scissors Ruler Put the stabilizer with its paper layer facing up. Mark the borders of the hoop. Cut a piece of stabilizer, using the marking on the paper layer. Put it on the outer ring with the paper layer facing up. Put the inner ring onto the stabilizer and press it down. Pull the edges of the stabilizer to smooth it out. Screw your hoop tightly. Put the plastic template on the hoop and mark the borders of embroidery area with a marker. Outline the borders of embroidery area with a marker or use the markings on the stabilizer. With the sharp end of scissors cut the paper layer along the lines. Take off the paper layer of stabilizer, to free the sticky side. Stick your fabric onto it. Embroider your design. When the embroidery is completed, take the design off the stabilizer.
  5. Original text: unknown Good afternoon! Among the lovers of the machine embroidery there are those who prefer step-by-step tutorials, master-classes and other guidance materials, and there are also the ones who try to master the great variety of working practices all by themselves. For whose who are on the brink of engaging into learning machine embroidery techniques by themselves, here's a little bit of advice. The phrase "learn by yourself" does not mean "turn a blind eye to all that has been previously written on the subject", but "to use what has been previously written and to fill the gaps". Learning machine embroidery technique by yourself What you should notice when mastering the technology of embroidering on a specific type of fabric. The fabric and its characteristics You should know the fabric you are going to work with. Learn, if only superficially, its characteristics. Whether is stretches or not. Whether it is loosely or densely woven. Whether its surface is smooth or piled. If we are talking about using machine embroidery techniques on different types of fabric, I'd like to name it "Machine embroidery on the types of fabric that give you trouble", because in most cases embroidery on a densely woven smooth-surfaced material does not you cause any trouble at all, even the chosen design is a bit too dense. Stabilizers and hooping methods First of all, learn the main types of stabilizers in existence. We have already described various types of embroidery stabilizers and where to use them; also you can search our forum for tips. Try to figure out what type of stabilizer will be better for you fabric. Whether you should use a water soluble stabilizer or not. Whether you need an underlay and of what kind. When to use a tearaway stabilizer and when a cutaway will be better. Whether you should hoop the fabric or better go without it. Needles and threads You have probably noticed that many needles for machine embroidery and sewing are made for specific purpose. There are omni-purpose needles, embroidery needles, also needles for metallic thread, silk, woolen fiber etc. First, learn the materials available and then use what you have. Perhaps, the main recommendation on using needles will be as follows: You should not use expensive needles when working with densely woven fabrics that do not cause trouble, and when working with delicate fabrics such as silk or calico you should not use the same needles as you do for densely woven ones. Try to use rare and expensive needles for their intended purposes. The threads come in different types, too, and each of these types has its own usage recommendations. The main types of thread are polyester, viscose rayon, wool and cotton. The last two are the common polyester threads without luster, but with the addition of wool and cotton. Try using different threads with different types of needles available in your machine. When choosing which ones to use pay attention to the width of needle's eye and thread thickness. When you use a thick woolen fiber, you'd better not choose a narrow needle's eye. And so, gradually, you will understand, whether you should use a thick thread when embroidering on silk if you cannot use a thin needle with it. Whether you should choose a big eye needle when working with a thin thread. How many needles for silk will you need to embroidery a dense design on the tarpaulin... The Designs For a beginner all machine embroidery designs look the same. Beginners don't pay attention neither to the density of the design nor to filling characteristics. They don't yet know what the words "satin", "tatami" and "motif" mean. But such a situation won't last long. After having embroidered a dense chevron on a thin knitwear and having got a "bulletproof vest" as a result, or having embroidered a rare stitch on a terry towel you will understand that you should pay attention to design characteristics. To understand how a satin column pulls the fabric, how the tatami behaves, what restrictions apply to the stitch designs and where they will look good and harmonious. We will definitely write about all this in our blogs, and meanwhile we suggest that you embark on a journey of learning the machine embroidery techniques by yourself.
  6. Original text by: Nata Beloshveika Many of you have received big orders for t-shirts embroidered with logos. Sometimes rehooping takes more time than the embroidery process itself. I mean, the embroidery has to be in the same place on all items, if possible. So what do we do? Should we do the measuring and marking every time? But it is quite a laborious task, and boring, too. A solution exists! I want to show you my way of doing it. Embroidery on t-shirts. Materials and tools: A t-shirt A machine embroidery design Upper thread Underthread Double-sided adhesive tape Printing paper Embroidery stabilizer (Filmoplast) A ruler or a triangular Tailor's chalk, design knife, scissors Embroidery on t-shirts. The making process: I create all my designs by myself. Previous to the beginning of the embroidery I run a guide stitch 5-7 mm away from the contour. Hoop one layer of printing paper. Run the guide stitch without a thread. Carefully cut out a window in the paper along the stitches with the knife. Stick a double-sided adhesive tape around the perimeter of the window. Take off the first layer of adhesive. Now I'm going to mark out the placement of my future embroidery on the first t-shirt. To do this I measure the front side and mark the bottom left corner of the design with the chalk. Onto the marked t-shirt I put a layer of printing paper in order to create a template for hooping other t-shirts. I draw all the necessary outlines there — neck hole, shoulders, arm-holes (for small size t-shirts, because the L-size ones will not fit into the A4 format), central line or placket line for a polo shirt. Also I mark the left corner of my future design with the cross. Then I put the hoop on top of it, so that the cross on my template would be exactly in the lower left corner of the hoop. This is important! You should make sure that the hoop lines to the template and the t-shirt — check horizontal and vertical marks (vertical are very handy for checking against the knitwear loops), so that it would not move. Then I trace the hoop contour (it's better to use a felt pen to make the lines visible of the wrong side of the template) and cut out the template along the construction lines (neck line, middle, arm hole). The template is ready! All of this has been a preparation job. Now we proceed to the hooping. I cut a piece of filmoplast, so that it would cover all the adhesive tape frame. Stick it onto the adhesive tape, take off the protection layer. I take the t-shirt inside out and put the template on top of the left (!!!) half of the t-shirt. Then I superimpose the neck hole, the central line and the arm-holes. Put a hoop on top of it (with the layer of adhesive facing down), superimposing the hoop and the template. Carefully remove the template from under the hoop, so that it would not move. Once again carefully (the hoop must not move in relation to the t-shirt) fold the t-shirt around the hoop — first the sleeves and then the bottom. Then I turn the whole thing over and stick filmoplast to the t-shirt, smoothing it out with one hand. Carry it to the machine, without turning it right way round. Having unfolded the hoop on the side where the screw is, I set the hoop into the embroidery machine, smooth out the t-shirt under the foot and turn it the right way round to open the embroidery area. Now I begin to embroider. After having completed I take off the hoop from the machine and carefully unstick filmoplast from the adhesive tape. And after that I begin this all over again — stick filmoplast into the hoop, put a template on the t-shirt, stick the hoop to the t-shirt and embroider. All this is done very quickly and the result is of a high quality. I wish you the same!
  7. Master-class by: Irina Lisitsa Cutaway non-adhesive stabilizer works very good for embroidery on knitwear. Using this type of stabilizer allows keeping the shape of the embroidered area while the item is in use. Cutaway non-adhesive stabilizer is used with temporary spray adhesive. This master-class will tell you how to hoop a cutaway non-adhesive stabilizer in the right way. How the right and wrong side of the item secured with the non-adhesive stabilizer look like. The embroidery was made on the fabric with thin stockinette structure. Materials: Cutaway non-adhesive stabilizer Hoop Temporary spray adhesive An item Unscrew your hoop and take the inner part out. Put a cutaway non-adhesive stabilizer onto the outer ring. Put the inner ring onto it and press it down to secure the stabilizer. Pull the edge of a stabilizer so that it is tight in the hoop. Shake up a tube of spray. Put a layer of spray adhesive onto the stabilizer. Stick your fabric onto the stabilizer. Set you hoops in your machine and embroider the design. After the embroidery is completed, cut stabilizer away near the contour. The embroidery is ready!
  8. Puckering (also known as cupping) is the gathering of material in an embroidery design which results in noticeable mounds of fabric and/or curled embroiderydesigns. This is undesirable in quality stitching and when it occurs, the cause of the problem should be determined and corrected. There are a number of factors which can contribute to puckering and they include: The embroidery design Often design stitch densities are simply too high and editing is required to reduce this density. A quality digitized design will produce a stitchout which compliments and flows with the garment .... not protect it, like a layer of armor.Insufficient or improper underlay stitching can also lead to puckering. Underlay stitches serve a number of purposes and one of them is to attach the material being stitched to the stabilizer before the actual top stitching begins. This helps to control some of the “push - pull” effect which will occur during stitching. Long stitch lengths tend to apply more “pull” to the material being stitched than short ones. Sometimes puckering can be reduced or eliminated by using shorter stitch lengths. For example, reduce 6 mm long stitches to 3 or 4 mm. Stitch direction can contribute to puckering. Embroidery designs having the majority of fill stitches running in the same direction or those that do not take into account the bias of the material being stitched, can produce puckering. If possible, direction of stitching should vary from one fill area to another and should run at an angle to the bias of the material. Improper patching can also cause puckering. Stitching the outside areas of the design first and working towards the inside can result in the material being “pushed up” in the center. Generally, it is best to have a design stitch from the center - out [as much as possible]. Stabilization Stitching without sufficient, proper stabilization can produce puckering [especially in lighter and/or problem materials]. As a general rule in embroidery, consider using a quality 2 - 3 oz. cut-away for most jobs because not only does the cut-away offer the best support during stitching, it also continues this support for the life of the garment. Switch to specialty stabilizers (tear-away, mesh, water solubles, etc.) only when the job warrants it. Hooping Using a large hoop for a small design can lead to excessive movement and shifting of material .... which in turn can result in puckering. In order to limit material movement and reduce the chance of puckering, always use the smallest hoop possible and when hooping, the material / stabilizer should be taunt [but not stretched] in the hoop. Embroidery thread tensions An embroidery machine with excessively high thread tensions can cause unnecessary “pull” on the material being stitched, which in turn can contribute to puckering. Properly tension ed, smooth, consistent running top and bobbin threads go a long way in creating a quality stitchout and help reduce problems like puckering. Materials being stitched Some materials [like nylon, silk, and light knits spandex and jersey materials simply tend to be more prone to puckering than heavier, more stable ones [denim, fleece, heavy cotton, etc.] and when working with these more problematic materials, the embroiderer will have to do all that they can to eliminate the potential for puckering. Proper editing of embroidery designs, good stabilization , good hooping practices and avoiding overly tight embroidery thread tensions all contribute to reduced puckering problems. Use the above information on puckering as a guide. However as with most things in embroidery, each job will offer its own variables and challenges which often need to be dealt with on an individual basis.
×
×
  • Create New...