Jump to content
  • Sign Up
  • Language
  • Matching the fabric and the stabilizer

       (0 reviews)

    Irina

    Original text by Marina Belova 

    Choosing a right stabilizer for a particular fabric is important for every embroiderer. If you want to know what a stabilizer is, what kinds of stabilizers are there and where they can be used, along with the other stuff, click here

    Wrong stabilizer plays has a great impact on the embroidery, for it is one of the reasons for various technical defects, which nobody wants. 

    Below are the recommendations on matching a particular type of fabric with a particular kind of stabilizer, which I found in various sources. You always need to have some kind of guide, if only a short one, which will give you a hint to where you stand and where to go from there. And then, to find a right kind of stabilizer for your type of fabric. 

    Obviously, one should choose a stabilizer according to the fabric qualities, such as: thickness, density, quality, type and so on. The basic rule goes as follows: the more tightly-woven and stable the fabric is, the lighter stabilizer it needs. And vice versa. In case you've found a right match you'll need only 1 layer of stabilizer (this is true in 99,9% of all cases). 

    The fabric

     

    The stabilizer

     

    Acrylic fabric

     

    Cut-away

     

    Acetate fabric

     

    Cut-away

     

    Velvet

     

    Tear-away adhesive stabilizer (Filmoplast) or heat-away stabilizer (Thermogaze)

     

    Corduroy

     

    Tear-away for the thick fabrics and cut-away for the thin ones

     

    Vynil

     

    Tear-away

     

    Felt

     

    Cut-away

     

    Gabardine

     

    Cut-away

     

    Gauzy fabric

     

    Dense water soluble for the backing and thin water soluble for the topping

     

    Jersey

     

    Cut-away

     

    Denim

     

    Tear-away or no stabilizer

     

    Chamois

     

    Cut-away for the thin fabrics and tear-away for thick ones

     

    Fake fur

     

    Tear-away for the backing and water-soluble film for the topping

     

    Damask

     

    Cut-away

     

    Leather

     

    Cut-away for the thin fabrics and tear-away for thick ones

     

    Lycra

     

    Spunbond

     

    Linen

     

    Cut-away with temporary spray adhesive

     

    Terry cloth

     

    Cut-away or tear-away for the backing and water-soluble film for the topping

     

    Muslin

     

    Cut-away with temporary spray adhesive

     

    Nylon

     

    Tear-away adhesive (Filmoplast), heat-away (Thermogaze) or high-quality tear-away stabilizer

     

    Voluminous knitwear

     

    Cut-away with temporary spray adhesive

     

    Organdy

     

    Cut-away adhesive

     

    Organza

     

    Water soluble or high-quality tear-away

     

    Sailcloth

     

    Cut-away for the thin fabrics and tear-away for thick ones

     

    Brocade

     

    Tear-away

     

    Percale

     

    Cut-away

     

    Pique

     

    Cut-away for the backing and water-soluble film for the topping

     

    Velour

     

    Tear-away adhesive (Filmoplast)

     

    Poplin

     

    Tear-away or cut-away, depending on the fabric thickness

     

    Sateen

     

    Cut-away

     

    Sateen

     

    Cut-away with temporary spray adhesive or tear-away adhesive (Filmoplast)

     

    Spandex

     

    Cut-away with temporary spray adhesive or tear-away adhesive (Filmoplast), spunbond

     

    Woolen cloth

     

    Cut-away

     

    Tweed

     

    Cut-away

     

    Knitwear (T-shirts)

     

    Cut-away, tear-away or spunbond, depending on the quality of knitted fabric

     

    Flannel

     

    Cut-away

     

    Fleece

     

    Cut-away

     

    Canvas

     

    Tear-away or no stabilizer

     

    Silk

     

    Tear-away

     

    Chiffon

     

    Tear-away

     


    I want to remind everyone that the aforementioned matches are the basic recommendations and not the rules

    What is also interesting is that a stabilizer is often replaced with other, cheaper, materials for cost reasons — the means the manufacturers strictly advise against (naturally). For example, you may see a stabilizer replaced with the printing paper, the embroidery spunbond with the building one, and water-soluble film with polyethylene. There is a lot of information about it on the Web. 

    I decided to check if water soluble film replacement was at all possible. You can read about this experiment here

    Edited by Irina

    • Upvote 1

    User Feedback

    There are no reviews to display.


  • Top Downloads

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...