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Beautiful design, Morning owl look amazing.

This embroidery work up perfectly and stitch out nicely. 
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Excellent stitches and original style

Stitched out beautifully! Looked amazing and no issues!
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Loving birds.. Wonderful designs, stitched out beautifully

Really cute, You love this when you stitched it. Would love more of same designs.
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Our designs looks great

Stitched out beautifully! Wonderful decoration!
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Adorable design. Stitches out beautifully.

"Thanks so much for this design It's lovely and stitched out beautifully on leather."
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  • diver361

    Embroidering on Carpet

    By diver361

    In some areas of leisure you will find niche markets, I have found one being able to make custom carpets for custom cars and sport fishing boats. So if you live near the water this is something you may want to offer, or if you have any car clubs in your areas. First you need to make a sample and bring it to car shows etc, or display it at your local dealers. Hi have done mats like the like the item Below, this was actually done for a young kids room.. As it was not going to be exposed to elements I was able to use some applique in the embroidery design. I have made over 20 specialized customer carpet sets for sport boats , custom cars and some other client that like items on carpets. I am also trying to break into the yacht market and embroider on carpets and seat covers. This is a niche market and I don't normally have standard pricing as you have to run your embroidery machine a lot slower it will take you twice as long to sew the designs, you will also go through more needles as once your done the job the needle are basically garbage, I would also recommend cleaning your embroidery machine between jobs the carpets give a fine dust that will get into the bobbin area when sewing. I have a small compressor right by the machine for blowing of the parts and lubricating. Most of my sets of carpets for a car go $250 to $400 and only quote on carpets for the trunk, I did one custom van and I had 5 carpets to do and I charge the customer $1200 for the job. When embroidering on carpets, you should be aware that conventional hoops will not be able hoop a carpet & that your embroidery machines arms will not support the weight on its own. I would recommend if you have a table raise it up to support the carpet. I use large clamps metal clamps to clamp it to the bottom sides of the embroidery machine arms, I found if you clamp it to the top it will stress the needle too much. I also recommend the following tips for sewing on carpets. Use a 80/12 Titanium needle with a sharp point as regular needles will get dull from punching through the carpet backing. All designs must be digitized for carpets as there are special requirements for the embroidery designs . Slow your machine down to a minimum of 400 rpm If its a Plush carpet please use topping this will prevent the presser foot from catching the nap of the carpet and or pulling out a strand or fiber of the carpet. Shave the outer edge of the carpet to prevent the nap from folding over the designs makes it look cleaner I use a Peggy stitch eraser If you want to sew you will either need to have the embroidery design made for carpets, keep in mind that you may run into problems if the embroidery design is not made properly. I purchased a used Merro embroidery machine to make custom carpets to fit the application and allows you to purchase bulk carpet for the application, If you have to purchase carpets that are customer made for the vehicle you will have to get in contact with the vendor. Another options is to sew through the rubber backing however doing this requires a great deal of patients and often frustrate you more than not however it can be done, If you consider attempting this you will need to use 110 needle and 40 weight polyester thread and slow your machine down. In addition between carpets check for needle damage and clean the needles blow of the dust from the embroidery machine. You also will need a industrial sewing machine for this option. Remember anything is possible however there is a learning curve when venturing into new areas.
    • 2 comments
    • 5,083 views
  • Irina

    Embroidery Stabilizers: Do You Really Need Them All?

    By Irina

    Original text by: Marina Belova I have once written a guide to all sorts of embroidery stabilizers (fusible interfacing materials) for manual embroidery. As we all know, the market is full of such auxiliary materials, which can be helpful to an embroiderer. Nevertheless, in these days I often think that not all of them are useful for me in my day-to-day work.  In the past I used to buy a lot of stabilizers of various brands, to see if they could be really helpful. I liked some of them and disliked the others; there were also certain products that I didn't know how and where to use even after having read the manual. In the course of time, after I gained some experience, it turned out that 3 or 4 types of stabilizer were sufficient for me to make a good embroidery. They really are enough for everything I embroider lately.  I'll show you what stabilizers I use for all routine projects and all types of fabric. I must specify though that the projects I do are rather simple: standard promotional designs on knitwear, terry cloth, occasionally caps, also ordinary materials like diagonal, coarse calico, two-thread cloth, sometimes the materials used in interior design, fore example silks and velvets of varying quality.  So, here's my basic embroidery stabilizer kit: 1.   Heavy-weight cutaway stabilizer (I wouldn't call it tearaway, like most of the sellers, because it doesn't tear that good), made in China. Density circa 60 g/m2. This stabilizer has a strongly pronounced fiber orientation, which isn't always good. Works fine for knitwear. Here it is: 2.   Medium weight cutaway stabilizer (some consider it tearaway) made in China or Turkey, density 35-40 g/m2. In my kit there is a cutaway stabilizer of 2 different brands, with and without fiber orientation (the last is my personal favorite). I use them for medium-level projects and ordinary textiles. Photo: an example of a stabilizer with single fiber orientation: And this is the one without any orientation: 3. A tearaway paper-like stabilizer, density circa 60 g/m2. It resembles recycled paper because it looks just as specked and non-uniform. I also have a punched-out variation of this paper, which also tears away easily. As it turned out, it comes in very handy when embroidering a design on terry cloth. But this paper-like stabilizer (and not only this one), as experience has shown, may be replaced by ordinary printing paper, which I sometimes do when it fits the size of design.  I rarely use other types of stabilizers, and usually as supplementary ones. 4. Thin water soluble film — a stabilizer topping for pile textiles, prevents the problem with pile piercing through the stitches. Nevertheless, I rarely use this film, too, but instead replace it with a stretch wrap or a plastic bag. I tested all the these materials in order to find a substitution for the expensive water soluble stabilizers, as I have already written. Water soluble stabilizers are used for lace and cutwork. There are also other types of auxiliary materials I use from time to time: Temporary spray adhesive Paper adhesive tape Double-sided adhesive tape And that's all there is to it. I don't keep a large variety of stabilizers. No spunbond, no heat away backing, no sticky backing paper-like filmoplast or other sticky embroidery stabilizers — I don't buy or use any of those. And even if I did buy some of them in the past, it was only for the purpose of examining them, because all these stabilizers can be replaced by their less expensive analogs. You can' have them all. Besides, if you embroidered on velvet using filmoplast as a stabilizer, it would turn out a real disaster, because filmoplast has a habit of taking the pile out, and it peels off easily, too. You have to be extremely careful with the projects that require a great number of stitches. Double-sided adhesive tape also tends to peel off the fabric.  Sometimes I think that everything new that pops up on the market is made with one goal in sight, and that is to induce customers to buy more and more materials. This happens because stabilizers become more and more differentiated, and not because they work better. It seems to me that the resulting embroidery is not always in connection with the price of a stabilizer and the innovations used in its making. What it depends upon is the quality of the design and the accuracy of hooping. Generally speaking, the resulting embroidery will be in strong connection with your experience in design making as well as handling different types of fabric and the embroidery machine.  Remember the general rule: the thinner the fabric, the thicker the stabilizer, however strange it might seem. You will get very soft lace using thermogaze, but it leaves residue which does not come off easily.  What stabilizers do you use in your work?
    • 4 comments
    • 7,561 views
  • Irina

    How to Evaluate The Thread Tension by Sight And What To Do About It

    By Irina

    Original text by: Marina Belova One would think that evaluating of tension of the thread is such an old chestnut. But no, last week it came as a revelation to me. It is strange that such an essential information is practically non-existent on the internet, whereas manuals only contain the instructions on how to do the most basic things. And it is such a shame, really.  So, everybody knows (including me) that after the embroidery has been completed, the backside of a perfect satin-stitch column should look like this: 1/3+1/3+1/3 (upper + under + upper). If the column is divided differently, it means that you need to adjust your upper thread tension or the under-thread tension on your bobbin case.  I shall be honest with you, I don't see this ideal picture often, certainly not all the time. Velles 15 is notorious for getting the thread tension wrong, of which I've written many times, and was supported by the others. But there is a problem with the dial itself, which is pretty crude and, consequently, lacks the possibilities the Velles 19 dial has. But no matter how the dial was made, you have to adjust it all the time. The question is, how do you do it? Sometimes it's quite difficult a task to adjust it properly.  As it happens, you have to act wisely. First of all, I'll show you the most typical occasion which happens all the time when I use my Velles 15, and which has always puzzled me. These are my real works, not the test pieces:  As it turns out, this irregular outcome of the bobbin thread is a mark that something is wrong with a bobbin case. Is it either bent or damaged.  To check this just lay the bobbin case with the bobbin inside onto the table or any other flat surface with bobbin facing down. Then pull at the thread, holding the case slightly and allowing the bobbin to uncoil freely. It the thread is not uncoiled smoothly, but jerkily, it is the sign that the bobbin case has been damaged, so that it is not round anymore. Most likely, it was dropped on the floor in the past. I have dropped it, of course, even more that once, but I never thought about the consequences.  To cut the long story short, you must have a spare bobbin case. Sometimes the jerking like that cannot be corrected in any other way. And now I'll tell you about two of the most typical examples.  a. The under-thread is just barely visible on the underside or not visible at all: In this case you will have to find time to run your machine through all those tension tests at least once  to find out what happens with every one of your needles. Here you can also see the perfectly emblematic old photo of the old I-test from the times when I already had huge problems with a bobbin case.  It turned out, to my surprise, that there are two ways of adjustment in this situation (this nuance of evaluation of the test results is hardly mentioned at all):  •    If such is the situation with all or nearly all of your needles, loosen the under-thread tension. 
    •    But if this happens only with 2 or 3 needles, tighten the upper thread on them.  b. The under-thread on the underside is more than 1/3 column wide):  Again, run your machine through all the tests using every needle and see. And again you can get two different results:  •    If such is the result produced by all the needles, tighten the under-thread tension. 
    •    If you get it only with 2 or 3, loosen the upper thread.  That is basically all. I didn't know that it was so easy and used to regard thread tension tests with disdain. One should love their embroidery machine and care about it, so that it could reciprocate and minimize the number of unpleasant moment in the course of embroidery.  We have so much yet to learn.  P.S. A thought just popped in my head: what about single-thread embroidery machines that don't have a lot of needles, which can help you to compare their performance and understand what tension needs to be adjusted? How do you adjust the tension there? 
    Some of my readers suggest buying a special device that helps to adjust upper and under-thread tension. And what do you think?
    • 0 comments
    • 1,780 views
 

For those who begin to learn machine embroidery techniques by themselves

Original text: unknown Good afternoon! Among the lovers of the machine embroidery there are those who prefer step-by-step tutorials, master-classes and other guidance materials, and there are also the ones who try to master the great variety of working practices all by themselves. For whose who are on the brink of engaging into learning machine embroidery techniques by themselves, here's a little bit of advice.  The phrase "learn by yourself" does not mean "turn a blind eye to all that has been previously written on the subject", but "to use what has been previously written and to fill the gaps".  Learning machine embroidery technique by yourself  What you should notice when mastering the technology of embroidering on a specific type of fabric.  The fabric and its characteristics  You should know the fabric you are going to work with. Learn, if only superficially, its characteristics. Whether is stretches or not. Whether it is loosely or densely woven. Whether its surface is smooth or piled.  If we are talking about using machine embroidery techniques on different types of fabric, I'd like to name it "Machine embroidery on the types of fabric that give you trouble", because in most cases embroidery on a densely woven smooth-surfaced material does not you cause any trouble at all, even the chosen design is a bit too dense. Stabilizers and hooping methods First of all, learn the main types of stabilizers in existence. We have already described various types of embroidery stabilizers and where to use them; also you can search our forum for tips. Try to figure out what type of stabilizer will be better for you fabric. Whether you should use a water soluble stabilizer or not. Whether you need an underlay and of what kind. When to use a tearaway stabilizer and when a cutaway will be better. Whether you should hoop the fabric or better go without it.  Needles and threads  You have probably noticed that many needles for machine embroidery and sewing are made for specific purpose. There are omni-purpose needles, embroidery needles, also needles for metallic thread, silk, woolen fiber etc. First, learn the materials available and then use what you have. Perhaps, the main recommendation on using needles will be as follows: You should not use expensive needles when working with densely woven fabrics that do not cause trouble, and when working with delicate fabrics such as silk or calico you should not use the same needles as you do for densely woven ones. Try to use rare and expensive needles for their intended purposes.  The threads come in different types, too, and each of these types has its own usage recommendations. The main types of thread are polyester, viscose rayon, wool and cotton. The last two are the common polyester threads without luster, but with the addition of wool and cotton. Try using different threads with different types of needles available in your machine.  When choosing which ones to use pay attention to the width of needle's eye and thread thickness. When you use a thick woolen fiber, you'd better not choose a narrow needle's eye.  And so, gradually, you will understand, whether you should use a thick thread when embroidering on silk if you cannot use a thin needle with it. Whether you should choose a big eye needle when working with a thin thread. How many needles for silk will you need to embroidery a dense design on the tarpaulin...  The Designs For a beginner all machine embroidery designs look the same. Beginners don't pay attention neither to the density of the design nor to filling characteristics. They don't yet know what the words "satin", "tatami" and "motif" mean. But such a situation won't last long. After having embroidered a dense chevron on a thin knitwear and having got a "bulletproof vest" as a result, or having embroidered a rare stitch on a terry towel you will understand that you should pay attention to design characteristics. To understand how a satin column pulls the fabric, how the tatami behaves, what restrictions apply to the stitch designs and where they will look good and harmonious.  We will definitely write about all this in our blogs, and meanwhile we suggest that you embark on a journey of learning the machine embroidery techniques by yourself.

Irina

Irina

 

Splitting a machine embroidery design for future alignment

Original text by: Lisa Prass The problem of splitting a design emerges when a beginner understands that his (her) embroidery machine does not recognize the design only because it exceeds maximum size and does not fit the largest hoop that comes with the machine. Or, it fits the giga hoop, but the machine still fails to recognize it. If you have encountered such a problem, this article is for you. Splitting a machine embroidery design First, I want to mention that here we'll discuss only the machine embroidery designs saved in a stitch format. The ones that you have downloaded from our site or got other sources. It is the format your machine can recognize, and if it cannot, change the format into the one your machine can recognize and then continue reading this article. Got it? Splendid! So, you have a machine embroidery design in a format that can be recognized by your machine, and this design exceeds your maximum embroidery area. Maximum embroidery area Beginners are often surprised by the fact that even if they have a giga hoop and design that fits, their machine still fails to recognize it. The problem is that the machine has such a parameter as maximum embroidery area, and if the size of a design exceeds it, it does not matter whether you have a giga hoop or not. The size of the maximum embroidery area is determined by the manufacturer, and the machine cannot go beyond that. Therefore, if a design is bigger than specified, you will have to split it. Giga hoops are just a tool for embroidering designs beyond the maximum embroidery area. You can find out the size of your machine's maximum embroidery area in the manual. If all written above is clear, let's proceed... Splitting a machine embroidery design So, the size of your design goes beyond the specified limits, therefore, you have to split it and embroider stage by stage. This assumes that you have some embroidery software on your computer and also the experience of working in it. How the design will be split in many ways depends from the design itself. You should approach each case individually. I don't see a decision that could satisfy them all, and describing every single one of them seems futile to me. We'll better look into them in our next articles. I may just say this: you'll encounter problems while splitting a design only in the beginning. Having split 2 or 3 designs, you'll understand the whole process much better. You also learn all the nuances. When splitting a design and placing it in the hoop like the picture below shows us, you should bear in mind that the hoops must superimpose, otherwise there parts of the design won't match. Part of the design situated in the hoop must be a bit smaller than the hoop itself, so that in case of unsuccessful hooping you could move or turn it, to align with the previous part. Aligning a machine embroidery design Any case of splitting a design assumes the future alignment. A similar process goes between the two apparatuses on the satellite trajectory. But in that case the alignment is done by a special mechanism, whereas in machine embroidery the two parts of the same design are aligned with the help of alignment stitches, of which we will tell a bit later. There are two main ways of aligning parts of the same design: •    Alignment in giga hoop
•    Rehooping the fabric The difference between these two ways is only that in the first case you join two or three parts of the design with the help alignment stitches and without rehooping, whilst in the second case you align the parts of a split design with the help of alignment stitches, but still need to rehoop every time. About the alignment stitches There are different kinds of those. They can come in the shape of a border stitching or straight lines going across the embroidery area or special alignment crosses. Everything the embroider's imagination can produce. But regardless of their type, the alignment stitches are used only temporarily and are deleted after the completion of a design. The alignment stitches are added in the embroidery editor either automatically or manually by the user. How it is done depends on the software that is currently in use, its possibility to save the design for giga hoops, the alignment method and your own wishes. The alignment stitches must be present in both parts of the design. The embroidery process goes like this: 1. Do the first part of the design.
2. Embroider the alignment stitches.
3. Rehoop your fabric or change the position of your giga hoop.
4. Join the alignment stitches.
5. After the perfect match is achieved, you do the second part of the design.
6. Repeat the process the necessary number of times. In my opinion these are the main points on splitting a design and its future alignment when embroidering. In conclusion I want to bring to your notice a problem, which the owners of the old machines or the beginner level machines can encounter. Splitting a design by layers There can be situations when the machine does not recognize the design even if it does not exceed its maximum embroidery area. This usually happens with the designs that have many colors and large stitch count. The machine simply is not able to read such an amount of information from one file. Photostitch designs are notorious for that. Nowadays, with all the contemporary machines such occurrences have become quite rare, but if you use the equipment made at the dawn of the previous century you might encounter a problem. The design is split into 2 or 3 part to be embroidered one by one. You don't rehoop the fabric. The design is embroidered without moving. For example, a design has 25 flowers which will be embroidered one after the other, in this case the 1st file will contain first 15 flowers, and the 2nd one — the remaining 10.

Irina

Irina

 

Splitting a design in PE Design using Photostitch design as an example

Original text by: Lisa Prass So, you have created or downloaded a machine embroidery design that does not fit you hoop. Now, to embroider the design, you should take a series of actions to split it. In this lesson I will show you how to split a design, how to add the alignment stitches and crosses, and how to save it into two different files, using a "Stitch" machine embroidery design in Photostitch technique as an example. The process includes several basic steps... Splitting a design: creating and positioning of the hoop  Using the Rectangle tool, create additional objects that will imitate your hoop. Place them in the embroidery area so that your machine embroidery design would be within these virtual hoops. If you don't like what you see, change the position of the hoop until you will achieve the result you want.  The hoops for which you split your design must have an intersection (remember what you learned about the intersection of sets at school?), otherwise the alignment with the help of crosses will be impossible. Splitting a design: how and where?  The main task of splitting a machine embroidery design is that the separating lines must not be seen when embroidering. Therefore, you should understand where it is better to split an object and whether it is possible to get along without splitting. Learn to split so as to hide the separating lines under the last embroidered objects. After splitting the design in your mind, proceed to do it in reality. Instructions on what splitting tool to use and how, you can find in video tutorials on Youtube. Having split the design, you now come to the next part: adding of the alignment stitches. Splitting a design: adding alignment stitches/crosses  Some people prefer alignment stitches, some use alignment crosses. Both are utilities allowing you to quickly and within the accuracy of 1 mm join two designs into one project while rehooping. Recommendations on what tools and with what preferences you should use when creating the utilities for making the joining process easier, you can find on Youtube.  Alignment stitches and crosses are always situated in the hoop intersection area and are present in both first and second parts of a design. In the first part of a design they are embroidered last, and in the second they are embroidered in the beginning. They must match together. If they match loosely, you should rehoop the fabric or change the design position in the hoop. If possible, place you alignment stitches and crosses where there will be no embroidery. If there is no such possibility, delete them after aligning. Splitting a design: saving  After having completed the splitting you should save the result into two different files, which will be embroidered one after the other, and choose which one of them will come first. In our example, we embroider the body first and then the head. Is it clear, why? Because if there is a minor offset, Stitch's head won't look like it is incorporated into his body. Before saving your design delete the virtual hoops, because they have completed their task and you won't need them anymore.  After this lesson you'll have 2 files as a result: Body. PES and Head.PES. Steps in these files go as follows:  Body.PES: First, you embroider all the objects of Stitch's body, then the alignment stitches and crosses.  Head.PES: First, you embroider all the stitches and crosses, and then all the objects of Stitch's head.

Irina

Irina

 

Giga hoops for outsize embroidery designs

Original text by: Lisa Prass Every embroidery or sewing and embroidery machine has its maximum embroidery area. The hoops for designs of that size are supplied with the machine. The embroidery process goes like this: you set your hoop and embroider your design from the beginning to the end, not moving the hoop once. Sometimes, the hoop with maximum design area much bigger than specified in the user’s manual also comes with the machine. Such hoops have their own names depending on the brand: jumbo magna hoop, giga hoop, mega hoop. These hoops allow you to embroider designs that exceed the maximum embroidery area.  Giga hoops for embroidery machines  All the listed hoops belong either to the multi-position or the rotating hoops. Their primary purpose is to allow the customer to embroider designs exceeding the machine's maximum embroidery area. The embroidery in such hoops is done stage-by-stage, without rehooping the material.  Multi-position giga hoops  For embroidery machines with the hoop holder located on the left multi-position hoops are produced. The hoop is located between the holder and the body of the machine, which imposes restrictions on the hoop size. The embroidery area can be increased only lengthwise. The embroidery usually goes from top to bottom, changing the position of the hoop in the process. The embroidery process in this hoop goes like this: you set the hoop and embroider one part of your design (marked by the blue dotted line on the photo). Then you change the position of the hoop and embroider the next part (red dotted line), then change the position once more and embroider the last part of your design (green dotted line). There can be from 2 to 4 positions in general. Multi-position hoops are fixed only on one side. Rotating giga hoops  Rotating giga hoops are made for embroidery machines with the holder on the right side or at the rear. The embroidery area may be increased both lengthwise and breadthwise, because there is no restriction in the form of the body of the machine. Rotating hoops are fixed in two places (on the right and left). There can be from 2 to 6 positions. The embroidery process goes like this: you set the hoop and do the first part of the design (1). Then the hoop changes its position, and you do the second part of the design (2) After that the hoop rotates, you do the third part of the design (3), then the hoop changes its position, and you do the last part of the design (4). Machine embroidery designs for giga hoops  Now a bit about designs. The main problem with the beginners is that buying a giga hoop they think they can take any machine embroidery design that fits giga hoop embroidery area and embroider it. But it turns out that the machine cannot recognize the design. The key to that problem lies in understanding of this fundamental truth:  Design that are to be embroidered in the giga hoop must either be split into separate files beforehand or be prepared in machine embroidery design software by the embroiderer himself.  Some manufacturers make machine embroidery designs for giga hoops, which gives users an opportunity to embroider without doing all the preparations in the embroidery design software. These designs are usually marked "for giga hoops" and have a list of recommendations in their supplementary sheet.  If you downloaded a design that exceeds the maximum embroidery area of your embroidery machine, but fits the giga hoop, you should use the design editor.  Every embroidery software has its own ways of splitting the design, and every design must be treated individually. But this will be the topic of some other blog. Meanwhile we invite you to discuss the ways of splitting the designs for giga hoops on our forum.

Irina

Irina

 

Embroidery on knitwear with the help of organza

Original text by: Irina Lisitsa Embroidery on knitwear requires the use of supplementary machine embroidery materials. You have to embroider a knitwear jacket ASAP, but all the specific stabilizers have run out? You may replace them with a piece of cloth that does not stretch, thin organza for example. This method is good for designs with loose fillings or made with columns, because organza will preserve the structure and prevent the stitches sinking into the fabric. Embroidery on knitwear. Materials: Embroidery threads Machine embroidery design The top stabilizer, a water soluble film Your item A piece of organza, big enough for hooping Embroidery on knitwear. A step by step guide: Hoop a piece of organza, like you hoop embroidery stabilizers. Spray it with adhesive, then mark the center of your design on an item or fabric. Stick your item on your organza piece. Add a piece of thin water soluble film on the top so that the embroidery on uneven-surfaced knitwear would come out neat, and the stitches wouldn't sink into the fabric. Set you hoops in your machine. Run the basting stitch first: this will join all the layers together and will hold the fabric in place while embroidering. Run the embroidery. After the embroidery is completed, remove the basting. Tear the water soluble film from the right side of the item and carefully remove the organza pieces between the embroidered objects. The work is done. Your embroidery on knitwear has been completed successfully!

Irina

Irina

 

Embroidering along the seam. How to position a design properly

Original text by: Tania Makarova This master-class tells a secret of embroidering a machine embroidery design, which must be oriented along the seam. It is important to place a design on the item and stabilize it when positioning along the seam. This master-class will tell you how to do it. Materials:  An item Machine embroidery design Temporary spray adhesive Tearaway stabilizer (non-adhesive) Underthread Upper thread (metallic) Embroidering a design along the seam. Preparing for the job:  1. Hoop the cutaway non-adhesive stabilizer. Load your design into your embroidery machine. Draw a line on your stabilizer, along which your design will be oriented. To determine how to position the fabric, set you hoops in your machine and to the tracing. Mark the stabilizer at the extreme points of the design and spray it with adhesive. Take the hoops from you machine and add a layer of spray adhesive to your stabilizer. 2. Mark the upper and the lower edges of the future design on the item. Place your item so that the middle of a seam would match the drawn line. If your machine has an option of scanning the fabric, it will help you to quickly position the fabric on the stabilizer; the seam will be shown on display, and you will be able to move the design right or left, if necessary. 3. Temporarily stabilize the item with pins.  In the course of preparing of this master-class I added a basting stitch in the editor. It is used for holding the fabric in place and also to ensure that the middle of a seam coincides with the line drawn on stabilizer. How to add lines to the design, you'll read in our future blogs.  If you notice that your basting stitch does not coincide with your seam, you should stop sewing and remove the thread. Repeat the positioning of the fabric on stabilizer. You can also do it by hand, arranging the fabric so that the stitching line would go in the middle of the seam. Be careful and try not to put your fingers under the needle! 4. Run your machine and embroider your design. It's ready now! You just embroidered a design with the seam right in the middle. All you have to do now is to rip off the basting stitch. You can use this method for embroidering designs, which are positioned at an angle. When embroidering a decorative pocket, I decided to run the stitch line along the contour of the pocket, under the finishing satin stitch. In this case you won't need to remove the basting.

Irina

Irina

 

Creating a lace edging

Original text by: Lena Craftwork Sometimes you need to add a nice edging to an item. There are many ways to do it, and we will see one of them here: creating a lace edging. You can decorate a napkin, a handkerchief or any other item with lace. There are numerous FSL machine embroidery designs; choose the one that suits you and matches your item. Materials: Water soluble stabilizer Spray adhesive Upper thread Underthread Fabric for your napkin The process of creating a lace edging goes like this: 1. Hoop the water soluble stabilizer. Load your design into your embroidery machine. Begin embroidering. The first stitch will mark the position of the edge of fabric on stabilizer. 2. Add a layer of spray adhesive to your stabilizer. Stick your fabric to the stabilizer according to the outline and repeat the embroidery using the first thread color. This will secure the fabric in place. Then continue your embroidery and do the lace part. If you created your design using special software, the embroidery will go along the fabric edge and also at the corner. To decorate other parts of the napkin repeat the same thing joining the lace parts together. Hoop water soluble stabilizer and embroider using your first thread color. Place the second corner of your napkin onto the stabilizer, and secure it there. 3. Repeat the embroidery along all the remaining edges. 4. Cut the stabilizer near the edge of your embroidery. After the work is completed, wash your napkin with a lace trim in a sufficient amount of warm water. The napkin is ready. You can decorate a tablecloth or a handkerchief in this way, too.

Irina

Irina

 

Greater than, less than or equal to? Changing the size of a digitized embroidery design

Original text by: Lisa Prass Once an idea came into my head — to change the size of the digitized machine embroidery design, which I have downloaded from one of the numerous machine embroidery design websites. Having loaded the design file into the machine, I resized it and pressed the Start button. Imagine my surprise when I noticed that the result differed greatly from the one I saw on the screen. I began to investigate this problem presented and arrived to a conclusion that it's better not to change the size of a design created with the use of the other software... Changing the size of a digitized embroidery design: From the creator to the embroidery machine Each machine embroidery design has its creator (puncher), a designer who creates a file using machine embroidery software. The name of this software is sometimes known only to the designer himself. After the job is finished, the designer saves the embroidery design file in the special format, which is recognized by this software in case there is a necessity to resize the design or change the stitching sequence — in other words, to edit the file. Having decided to share his invention with people, the creator converts the file into various formats recognized by embroidery machines of various brands (*.HUS, *.PES, *.JEF, *.ART etc.). And so this embroidery design fall into the hands of a demanding customer who wants to change its size and gets a result completely opposite to what is expected. If the spacing between the stitches becomes too narrow, all those beautiful filling patterns become flat or disappear completely. To understand why it happens one should look into the interior arrangement of a digitized machine embroidery design file.  The Inner Structure A digitized machine embroidery design file is basically a series of stitches together with special codes understood by embroidery machines. All file formats fall into one of the two categories: stitch formats and outline formats. Outline formats retain the detailed information not only about stitches and machine commands, such as Trim, Jump or Color Change, but also about fillings, object outlines and the instruments that created the design. We call this a "native file format". You can resize a design like that with no loss in quality using only the software in which it was created. Usually, the outline file remains in the designer's collection, while the stitch file is the one that is shared with the public.  Stitch file only retains the stitch data and machine codes. All the details referring to object outlines and fillings are deleted from this file. A stitch file exist solely for the purpose of loading it into the embroidery machine and embroidering. But as different embroidery software tools as well as different embroidery machines use their own "languages", the native outline file of one software program will be recognized as a stitch file by the other or not recognized at all, if there is no such option available.  Changing the size You can change the size of a design using software for creation of digitized machine embroidery designs or convertor software or the embroidery machine itself, if it has such an option. First, I want to point out that changing the size of an already digitized design is a thankless job and one should avoid it whenever possible. But it you are determined to make a ready-to-use design smaller, here are two ways of doing it: 1. Changing the size of a digitized embroidery design by re-calculating the number of stitches. Most of the software products for creation of machine embroidery designs have the object recognition option. In fact, this process may be called tracing from the stitch format into the outline one. If you are familiar with image editors, this process is similar to image tracing, i.e. converting a raster-based image into a vector-based one. When loading the design into the software or changing it's size the user can use the option of object recognition and in this case the software will try to single out a group of stitches which, in its opinion, resembles an object created with the help of available tools. I should point out that there is no contemporary embroidery design digitizing software that can fully recognize objects and recreate all the filling patterns. You will either get an object with wrong filling pattern or an object where the stitches are distorted.  Such objects as straight stitch, satin stitch columns with the invariable stitch length are recognized better than the others.  The objects that pose problems are the ones of an intricate shape with complex filling, made with alternate needle points, also satin stitch columns with different stitch lengths.  2. Changing the size of a digitized embroidery design without re-calculating the number of stitches. The process of resizing a design without re-calculating the number of stitches is very similar to changing the map scale.  Remember your geography lessons. The map on the wall was much bigger than the outline map on your desk.  The distance between cities is similar to the spacing between the stitches in a design (we call it density). Making a design bigger or smaller, you change spacing proportionally. When resizing a design without re-calculating the number of stitches you risk getting a design with not enough space between the stitches or too much space between the too long stitches. This happens because the program sees the design as the plain stitch with different spaces between stitches. This method is useful when the density of the chosen design doesn't suit you for some reasons, and you want to change it whereas making the design 5-10% bigger or smaller is OK with you.  While changing the size of a design in that way don't forget to register the appearance of minimum and maximum stitches.  Change the design size for no more than 5-10%. Consider that PES format is marked both as stitch and outline. Almost all software programs recognize it as stitch, and only PE Design considers it outline. But here's the nuance to it: a PES file must be created in PE Design, not converted into it in other software. EMB is an outline file, a native format of Wilcom software. It doesn't have any relevance to EMB stitch format, which is recognized by Pfaff embroidery machine. 

Irina

Irina

 

How to Evaluate The Thread Tension by Sight And What To Do About It

Original text by: Marina Belova One would think that evaluating of tension of the thread is such an old chestnut. But no, last week it came as a revelation to me. It is strange that such an essential information is practically non-existent on the internet, whereas manuals only contain the instructions on how to do the most basic things. And it is such a shame, really.  So, everybody knows (including me) that after the embroidery has been completed, the backside of a perfect satin-stitch column should look like this: 1/3+1/3+1/3 (upper + under + upper). If the column is divided differently, it means that you need to adjust your upper thread tension or the under-thread tension on your bobbin case.  I shall be honest with you, I don't see this ideal picture often, certainly not all the time. Velles 15 is notorious for getting the thread tension wrong, of which I've written many times, and was supported by the others. But there is a problem with the dial itself, which is pretty crude and, consequently, lacks the possibilities the Velles 19 dial has. But no matter how the dial was made, you have to adjust it all the time. The question is, how do you do it? Sometimes it's quite difficult a task to adjust it properly.  As it happens, you have to act wisely. First of all, I'll show you the most typical occasion which happens all the time when I use my Velles 15, and which has always puzzled me. These are my real works, not the test pieces:  As it turns out, this irregular outcome of the bobbin thread is a mark that something is wrong with a bobbin case. Is it either bent or damaged.  To check this just lay the bobbin case with the bobbin inside onto the table or any other flat surface with bobbin facing down. Then pull at the thread, holding the case slightly and allowing the bobbin to uncoil freely. It the thread is not uncoiled smoothly, but jerkily, it is the sign that the bobbin case has been damaged, so that it is not round anymore. Most likely, it was dropped on the floor in the past. I have dropped it, of course, even more that once, but I never thought about the consequences.  To cut the long story short, you must have a spare bobbin case. Sometimes the jerking like that cannot be corrected in any other way. And now I'll tell you about two of the most typical examples.  a. The under-thread is just barely visible on the underside or not visible at all: In this case you will have to find time to run your machine through all those tension tests at least once  to find out what happens with every one of your needles. Here you can also see the perfectly emblematic old photo of the old I-test from the times when I already had huge problems with a bobbin case.  It turned out, to my surprise, that there are two ways of adjustment in this situation (this nuance of evaluation of the test results is hardly mentioned at all):  •    If such is the situation with all or nearly all of your needles, loosen the under-thread tension. 
•    But if this happens only with 2 or 3 needles, tighten the upper thread on them.  b. The under-thread on the underside is more than 1/3 column wide):  Again, run your machine through all the tests using every needle and see. And again you can get two different results:  •    If such is the result produced by all the needles, tighten the under-thread tension. 
•    If you get it only with 2 or 3, loosen the upper thread.  That is basically all. I didn't know that it was so easy and used to regard thread tension tests with disdain. One should love their embroidery machine and care about it, so that it could reciprocate and minimize the number of unpleasant moment in the course of embroidery.  We have so much yet to learn.  P.S. A thought just popped in my head: what about single-thread embroidery machines that don't have a lot of needles, which can help you to compare their performance and understand what tension needs to be adjusted? How do you adjust the tension there? 
Some of my readers suggest buying a special device that helps to adjust upper and under-thread tension. And what do you think?

Irina

Irina

 

Crazy cats

I found these designs and did them for a friend who is a serious cat lover, 7 at the last count and actually has a ring in ginger.  I did these for gifts and she loves them and already is pdeciding which ones match her  babies. I didn;t have time to iron them before I took photos.  When I ironed them they looked awesome.   Thanks for the designs.  

kje410

kje410

 

Embroidery Stabilizers: Do You Really Need Them All?

Original text by: Marina Belova I have once written a guide to all sorts of embroidery stabilizers (fusible interfacing materials) for manual embroidery. As we all know, the market is full of such auxiliary materials, which can be helpful to an embroiderer. Nevertheless, in these days I often think that not all of them are useful for me in my day-to-day work.  In the past I used to buy a lot of stabilizers of various brands, to see if they could be really helpful. I liked some of them and disliked the others; there were also certain products that I didn't know how and where to use even after having read the manual. In the course of time, after I gained some experience, it turned out that 3 or 4 types of stabilizer were sufficient for me to make a good embroidery. They really are enough for everything I embroider lately.  I'll show you what stabilizers I use for all routine projects and all types of fabric. I must specify though that the projects I do are rather simple: standard promotional designs on knitwear, terry cloth, occasionally caps, also ordinary materials like diagonal, coarse calico, two-thread cloth, sometimes the materials used in interior design, fore example silks and velvets of varying quality.  So, here's my basic embroidery stabilizer kit: 1.   Heavy-weight cutaway stabilizer (I wouldn't call it tearaway, like most of the sellers, because it doesn't tear that good), made in China. Density circa 60 g/m2. This stabilizer has a strongly pronounced fiber orientation, which isn't always good. Works fine for knitwear. Here it is: 2.   Medium weight cutaway stabilizer (some consider it tearaway) made in China or Turkey, density 35-40 g/m2. In my kit there is a cutaway stabilizer of 2 different brands, with and without fiber orientation (the last is my personal favorite). I use them for medium-level projects and ordinary textiles. Photo: an example of a stabilizer with single fiber orientation: And this is the one without any orientation: 3. A tearaway paper-like stabilizer, density circa 60 g/m2. It resembles recycled paper because it looks just as specked and non-uniform. I also have a punched-out variation of this paper, which also tears away easily. As it turned out, it comes in very handy when embroidering a design on terry cloth. But this paper-like stabilizer (and not only this one), as experience has shown, may be replaced by ordinary printing paper, which I sometimes do when it fits the size of design.  I rarely use other types of stabilizers, and usually as supplementary ones. 4. Thin water soluble film — a stabilizer topping for pile textiles, prevents the problem with pile piercing through the stitches. Nevertheless, I rarely use this film, too, but instead replace it with a stretch wrap or a plastic bag. I tested all the these materials in order to find a substitution for the expensive water soluble stabilizers, as I have already written. Water soluble stabilizers are used for lace and cutwork. There are also other types of auxiliary materials I use from time to time: Temporary spray adhesive Paper adhesive tape Double-sided adhesive tape And that's all there is to it. I don't keep a large variety of stabilizers. No spunbond, no heat away backing, no sticky backing paper-like filmoplast or other sticky embroidery stabilizers — I don't buy or use any of those. And even if I did buy some of them in the past, it was only for the purpose of examining them, because all these stabilizers can be replaced by their less expensive analogs. You can' have them all. Besides, if you embroidered on velvet using filmoplast as a stabilizer, it would turn out a real disaster, because filmoplast has a habit of taking the pile out, and it peels off easily, too. You have to be extremely careful with the projects that require a great number of stitches. Double-sided adhesive tape also tends to peel off the fabric.  Sometimes I think that everything new that pops up on the market is made with one goal in sight, and that is to induce customers to buy more and more materials. This happens because stabilizers become more and more differentiated, and not because they work better. It seems to me that the resulting embroidery is not always in connection with the price of a stabilizer and the innovations used in its making. What it depends upon is the quality of the design and the accuracy of hooping. Generally speaking, the resulting embroidery will be in strong connection with your experience in design making as well as handling different types of fabric and the embroidery machine.  Remember the general rule: the thinner the fabric, the thicker the stabilizer, however strange it might seem. You will get very soft lace using thermogaze, but it leaves residue which does not come off easily.  What stabilizers do you use in your work?

Irina

Irina

 

Melco Bravo Embroidery Machine

If you want to engage in embroidery on a professional level, you should buy a reliable embroidery equipment with manifold possibilities that won't fail at the most crucial moment. Melco Bravo is a highly efficient 16-needle embroidery machine designed for amateur embroiderers turned professionals. A distinguishing feature of this machine is that it provides maximum efficiency for it's price. Melco Bravo allows you to embroider high quality designs on garments, hats, bags and large variety of textile products. Thanks to a smaller lower cylinder arm you can embroider on a wider variety of products while maintaining high speed.  Acti-Feed™, the patent system of active thread supply automatically adjust the thread tension and provides smooth working process without any thread breakage. BRAVO OS, the embroidery machine operational system, controls the thread tension and it's supply by providing a portion of thread needed and basing thread-tensioning upon three separate parameters for every thread regulated by piezotransducer. The better-quality embroidery is made on high speeds because of the lesser thread breakage. The system also allows you to embroider on some types of fabric without the use of the underlay. Melco Bravo is an embroidery machine with manifold possibilities for doing business. The small diameter cylinder arm allows you to embroider on various products, including the areas hard to embroider and also wider designs on caps. Cylinder hoops allow you to embroider on smaller areas, such as pockets and shirtsleeves, and also children's garments. The use of laser positioning mechanism will enable you to position you design properly.  Download Melco Bravo brochure Melco Bravo comes with DesignShop Lite, a professional embroidery design editor. DesignShop Lite allows you to scale, mirror and rotate a design, edit it's main characteristics, such as density, type of the underlay and shape of the hoop, and also work with the text. Embroidery is always in trend. Embroider with Bravo!

Irina

Irina

 

How to mark the position of your embroidery design on fabric before hooping

Original text by: Marina Belova Suddenly it struck me that marking the position of an embroidery design on fabric before hooping is a major stumbling block to me. Is is so because I often get fabrics and garments that cannot be marked with a leftover sliver of soap or even with a disappearing marker. Another reason for the issue being of such a great importance to me, because I don't have any magic device for positioning of the hoops and most probably won't have one in the nearest future. I mean one of those. In the course of my embroidery career I've learned several ways of marking various types of garments manually. Some of them were successful, others turned out to be a disaster; there were ones requiring a great deal of sweat and those that didn't require much time.  Let's begin with the least successful ones. Marking with a pencil. When I was just a beginner (and I started working with fabrics rather suddenly) I made this mistake. I marked the fabric with an ordinary pencil. And of course, I had to do it all over again, the cutting and the embroidery, because it turned out that the marks made with ordinary pencil do not wash off.  Marking with a tailor's chalk. I can tell from experience that marking your fabric with a chalk is not really a good idea, because it leaves traces on some types of fabrics.  Eventually I gained sufficient experience having changed several jobs that involved dealing with unique designs on very expensive fabrics, which were extremely tricky to mark. It took a long time, too, not just because marking itself is quite a task, but because the size of the fabric was usually 3X3.5 m. So we used the following ways instead: Marking a position with pins: first the center of the embroidery and then a couple of dots on X and Y axes. This is one of my favorites, because it is the quickest and never leaves any traces. But it's not always good. It is very handy when using a single needle Classic embroidery machine, which has a correction angle allowing for the machine to adjust to the fabric hooped rather haphazardly. Creasing all the necessary lines. A highly questionable operation, because it leaves crease marks on many types of fabric which could not be corrected with the help of a steam iron. Nevertheless, it can be used in some cases. Using special markers which disappear when exposed to light. I should point out that in my opinion the best disappearing markers are the cheap ones made in China. They make a thinner line that disappear more quickly then branded markers such as Madeira. But! They left an unwashable trace on several types of fabrics such as 100% cotton, which left me with a thought that one should test everything before using it.  Using markers easily erased by water. Well, they should be erased by water. It is not a problem in case you are going to wash your handiwork in future, but what if you don't? We used to carefully wash off the marks with a tampon, trying not to leave splotches. The thing is that some manufacturers use such a strong pigment (Hemline for example) that we had to do it 3 or 5 times, because after the fabric had dried off the marks appeared again. There are, of course, special erasers used with these two types of markers. But to buy both the marker and the eraser is not really cost-effective. Soap. A sliver of soap is very good: the outline can easily be washed off with water and removed with steam, too. But there is a fly in the ointment: first you should find the brand that does not leave greasy splotches (and even soap without additives can do that), and when you find one, it may not be possible to use it on the specific type of fabric. I found this out when working with natural silk.  And now, encore: basting.  Basting is the best way to mark your embroidery. Yes, I mean the one done with a plain needle and thread along the lines on the back of the fabric (if you have such a possibility, you'd better use your embroidery machine instead). Sometimes you cannot avoid a laborious job of drawing lines and basting. There were times when such an elaborate grid was needed for multiple hooping and lining up the elements of a design on the garment that it took me 4 or 5 hours to do the marking. But this method can be used wit practically every type of fabric including silk and silk velvet, which can damaged just by looking at it. And what won't one do to achieve a good result. Luckily, I haven't been working with a piece of a fabric about the size of a football field for some time now. But the question of placement and marking an embroidery remains one of the most important to me. I mostly work with similar garments nowadays, but the place for a design changes all the time. Up to a certain point in time towels and bathrobes made from terry cloth were my biggest problem. As they were mostly white, soap was out of question, because it would not be visible. Besides, the texture did not help much. That's why I made an outline with a disappearing marker and washed it off with water afterwords to make it disappear more quickly. But the terry cloth is a fabric of volume and bulk, so I had plenty to wash off, because the traces appeared again once the fabric was dry.  Once I was surfing the internet and stumbled across this photo where all the marks were made with writing pencil over the removable adhesive tape. This is how it works: first you place your garment onto the hooping device and do the hooping, then remove an adhesive tape and embroider. So I tried applying this to a terry cloth. It proved to be very handy, especially when embroidering a design in the corner of a towel, which is not very easy to place into round or square hoops. To embroider a corner in such a way is not the easiest task, but even to place it into the hoops is a problem. That's why I use frames when embroidering towels. Placing an unmarked fabric into the hoops is a skill I am yet to master. Though I'm not very eager to do so, because I have embroidered an incorrectly hooped garment in the past (I didn't know the proper way then). So, I need to embroider quite a big design in the corner of a towel. 1. I stick a piece of adhesive tape in the area where my marking is going to be. 2. Then I measure out all the distances and draw the lines. 3. Frame the fabric or the garment. 4. Trace it onto the fabric, then remove the adhesive tape. 5. Embroider a design. 6. Then I mark the back of a bathrobe before hooping.  You can use it for a big embroidery in the middle of a towel, too. That's all that is to it. You don't have to wash the marks off. Of course, you have to deal with adhesive, but it is only a trifling matter in comparison. One more way to mark your fabric is to use a tool called an alignment laser. It projects a perfect crosshair onto any surface you like.  To find the perfect center you should cut out your design pattern and place it onto your garment sprayed with a removable adhesive. Even if you misplace it slightly, you may always adjust the hoops.  And what do you do use to place a design onto the fabric? Share your placement tips and tricks, please. Did something escape my attention?
 

Irina

Irina

 

Ten Tips for Baseball Cap Embroidery

Ten Tips for Baseball Cap Embroidery Embroidery on caps is one of the most challenging tasks, because they have a whole set of special features that render usual embroidery equipment unfit for them. Use only those caps that will really fit your cap frames. It doesn't matter what you're doing: walking along the street, taking part in a corporate event or even — you never know — supporting you team during a baseball match, you see baseball caps everywhere, and they all look identical to you. What you can't even imagine is that there are numerous types of baseball caps depending on their size, shape, number of panels, and that means that not every type will fit your cap frames. In order to avoid poor quality embroidery, you should buy several models of baseball caps and try to embroider a pattern. See where it fits better. Try to offer only these types of baseball caps to your clients, but in case they insist on a particular model, see if it fits your уour embroidery equipment first. Don't economize on cap frames. The law of embroidery on baseball caps states that it is better to spend some money in order to buy various cap frames than to be able to embroider very few types of caps. So, if you plan to offer some promotional embroidery on baseball caps to your clients, buy a selection of cap frames. By doing so you will considerably expand your possibilities. Buy a 270 frame, too. It is useful because it enables you to embroider both the front and the sides of the cap simultaneously. Such a cap will look good and creatively different. Don't let the embroidery design height slip you mind. Every cap model implies design height of it's own. A 5 cm design height is standard for cap embroidery. If a design is too big, embroidery in the areas beyond the recommended 5 cm limit will come out warped, possibly with other defects. But you can go up to 5.75 cm on low profile and up to 6.25 cm on high profile. How to handle a wide design. If the machine embroidery design on the front of a 6-panel baseball cap is wider than 10 cm or you need to embroider small letters close to the peak, you should digitize from the middle of design outward. How to cope with puckering seams problem. Puckering center seams are the embroiderer's nightmare. They cause pulling and warp, which may damage your work. But there are some helpful tips on how to make an embroidery over a center seam neat and good-looking. Try to choose baseball caps with flat center seams, this will help to avoid tension and warp. Use a 80/12 needle, it won't bend when penetrating a seam. You should also use a sharp point instead of a ballpoint needle. Better use teflon-coated needles, because they penetrate the fabric more easily than traditional stainless steel ones. Also use polyester thread, which is stronger than rayon and will reduce the chance of a embroidery thread breakage. If your design includes lettering with an outline, digitize so that one letter is complete before moving to the next letter. Choose you stabilizer properly. If you embroider on a soft cap, use a stiff backing or the design will be distorted. If you embroider on a leather cap, increase stitch length and column width whilst reducing the density of fill stitches, because the large number of perforations creates the "etching effect", and the design may pop out. Use a single, continuous piece of backing when working with a 270 frame. Use your appliques carefully. Better not to use heavier weight fabrics with a high pile, such as corduroy or fleece for appliques on baseball caps. The stitches will sink into the pile and become invisible. Digitize a unique machine embroidery design for a cap. Some "experts" think that for a cap you can use a design digitized for an embroidery, say, on a pocket. Though these designs may look alike, they use different types and density of fill stitches, and also different techniques. Please remember that baseball cap designs should be digitized separately and be unique, or the unsatisfactory result will be guaranteed. Before ordering a embroidery design for embroidery on baseball caps you should tell the master all information required: the fabric of which the caps are made, the number of planes, the width of the center seam, the height of the crown. This will help to create a quality design.

Irina

Irina

 

Embroidering on Carpet

In some areas of leisure you will find niche markets, I have found one being able to make custom carpets for custom cars and sport fishing boats. So if you live near the water this is something you may want to offer, or if you have any car clubs in your areas. First you need to make a sample and bring it to car shows etc, or display it at your local dealers. Hi have done mats like the like the item Below, this was actually done for a young kids room.. As it was not going to be exposed to elements I was able to use some applique in the embroidery design. I have made over 20 specialized customer carpet sets for sport boats , custom cars and some other client that like items on carpets. I am also trying to break into the yacht market and embroider on carpets and seat covers. This is a niche market and I don't normally have standard pricing as you have to run your embroidery machine a lot slower it will take you twice as long to sew the designs, you will also go through more needles as once your done the job the needle are basically garbage, I would also recommend cleaning your embroidery machine between jobs the carpets give a fine dust that will get into the bobbin area when sewing. I have a small compressor right by the machine for blowing of the parts and lubricating. Most of my sets of carpets for a car go $250 to $400 and only quote on carpets for the trunk, I did one custom van and I had 5 carpets to do and I charge the customer $1200 for the job. When embroidering on carpets, you should be aware that conventional hoops will not be able hoop a carpet & that your embroidery machines arms will not support the weight on its own. I would recommend if you have a table raise it up to support the carpet. I use large clamps metal clamps to clamp it to the bottom sides of the embroidery machine arms, I found if you clamp it to the top it will stress the needle too much. I also recommend the following tips for sewing on carpets. Use a 80/12 Titanium needle with a sharp point as regular needles will get dull from punching through the carpet backing. All designs must be digitized for carpets as there are special requirements for the embroidery designs . Slow your machine down to a minimum of 400 rpm If its a Plush carpet please use topping this will prevent the presser foot from catching the nap of the carpet and or pulling out a strand or fiber of the carpet. Shave the outer edge of the carpet to prevent the nap from folding over the designs makes it look cleaner I use a Peggy stitch eraser If you want to sew you will either need to have the embroidery design made for carpets, keep in mind that you may run into problems if the embroidery design is not made properly. I purchased a used Merro embroidery machine to make custom carpets to fit the application and allows you to purchase bulk carpet for the application, If you have to purchase carpets that are customer made for the vehicle you will have to get in contact with the vendor. Another options is to sew through the rubber backing however doing this requires a great deal of patients and often frustrate you more than not however it can be done, If you consider attempting this you will need to use 110 needle and 40 weight polyester thread and slow your machine down. In addition between carpets check for needle damage and clean the needles blow of the dust from the embroidery machine. You also will need a industrial sewing machine for this option. Remember anything is possible however there is a learning curve when venturing into new areas.

diver361

diver361

 

Tajima Pulse experience: Carving your Way

Carving Your Way Introduction to Line Carving   When it comes to digitizing vehicles, and other complex items the line tool can assist with adding dimension to the embroidery design with minimal embroidery effect on the stitch count this is great as stitch counts can be high when creating works of art.   The tool is available for higher level in Tajima DGML by Pulse, and is standard in Maestro level. This tool looks like the following in Tajima DGML by Pulse 14 or Tajima DG15.   The short cut for this tools is Shift + F10 on your keyboard. This tool works the best on fills or satin stitches and it works best going the opposite direction of the stitch angle. To use the tools follow the steps below.   1. Draw you shape with the complex fill tool, have the stitches going horizontal   2 Next with the Line Carving tool , draw a line across the image vertically or on a slight angle.   3. Complete the segment and force the embroidery digitizing software to regenerate by pressing Shift G and it will turn from a vector line to the above image.   This technique adds very little stitches , it basically tells the machine to stop and start again giving the appearance of two fills side by side. It only adds stitches where it needs to shorten them for the fill.   This tool can be applied to embroidery fills, and satin stitches and works well in designs where you do not want to use the run stitch or other tools. An example of where it can be used to add dimension is below.   In the above example the run stitches add decoration to the top of the tractor,and the line carved adds detail. These tools should compliment each other when used in the embroidery designs.   So if you have this tool you should learn when and how to use it, I use it a lot on vehicle designs, flower veins , and decorative stitches on patterns.

diver361

diver361

 

Embroidery Tips n Tricks , Cap Challenges

Avoiding pit falls of working with Caps When dealing with your customers you may need to educate them on what the placement and size of the logo for your particular machine is, as often the customer will want the designs to be too large for the cap frame. Some cap frames can accommodate a 270 degree rotation and some only do 180 degrees, the height will depend on the hat. Rule 1 , Placement The designs should be places 1/2 inch above the brim of the hat this allows the needle to clear the metal bracket that holds the hat to the frame. Rule 2 , Size The size of the embroidery designs for the front for most hats should be less than 4.5 inches wide and no more than 2.75 inches high. Some caps will allow for larger areas. Rule 3 , Backing Its very important to have precut sheets of tearaway backing, I recommend buying in a roll and should be med to heavy tearaway for caps. Rules 4 , Embroidery Design The embroidery designs should be made for caps, this will eliminate the push of sewing to the middle. All text should be design to sew from the center out, ( In Tajima Pulse their a tab called sew direction for setting this ) The embroidery design should be made specific for hats. Rule 5 , Speed of machine I recommend slowing your machine down to 600 spm when embroidering on hats, this will help reduce distortion,. Rule 6 , Needles When working with hats you may experience higher number of needle breaks as some caps, like the flexfit caps seem to have a hard ridge in the center of six panel hats, using an 80/12 needle will eliminate some needle breaks. Ridge on Six Panel Caps When working with six panel hats that are structured and feel thick in the center of the hat , there are several methods for making it easier to embroider on. Method 1 Water With a spray bottle wet the front of the cap where your embroidery design is going to be, this will make the material more pliable and easier to work with. Method 2 Heat With a hat press you can pre-press the area where you need to put the embroidery logo on this will soften up the areas specially on the seams. Alternate Placement Brims Often you will get request to place logos on other areas of the hat, and you may have seen designs embroidered onto the brim of the hat, this is only available on custom hat orders where they embroider the design on the material before adding the brim and sewing the hat. Alternate Placement Sides of hats This various methods for placing logos on the side of hats, however your limited to the hoop fitting on the side often the brim will get in the way of hoop large than 3.5 inches, so your designs should be no large than 3 inches wide. You can get around this by using specialty hoops, Alternate Placement Back of Hats This can be done with a standard 4 inch hoop and works with a wide range of styles, Often you will need to arc your text to match the contour of the back of the hat depending on the style. Check with your hat vendor many of them will have a custom hat program or pre made hats with logos embroidered on them . Usually a minimum order is required for custom hats to be made. I deal with AJM International or Headwear and they both have custom hat programs.

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Digitizing for Fleece


In the spring, fall and winter you will often get asked to make machine embroidery designs for fleece, this fabric has some very unique properties compared to other fabrics. You should not be afraid of fleece if you follow some basic tips,.   The first thing you will need to know about fleece which way stretches, unlike jersey material fleece only stretches in one direction, so you will need to determine the fabrics your working with which way the stretch is this will directly impact how you compensate for the embroidery design when digitizing it. When hoping fleece I recommend that you a adhesive backing and a water soluble topping. Hooping the material 1. Lay the water soluble topping on the hoop making sure its flat with no wrinkles 2. Lay the fleece over the topping and hoop the fleece so its not stretch but taunt in the hoop.   3. Cut a piece of adhesive backing and place on the back of the fleece. This will give it added support while being embroidered and reduce the amount of stretch in the fabric. Needles I recommend using a 75/11 needle that has a sharp tip for fleece. Digitizing for Fleece When digitizing for fleece you have to account for several things, (1) the nap of the fleece, (2) the stretch direction of the fleece (3) Use more underlay and reduce the density of the design, The water soluble topping will generally protect and reduce the effect of the design shrinking into the fabric it will also keep the nap at bay. You will need to compensate for the stretch in the fabric I always recommend that you use .02 inch absolute compensation. The last thing you need to do is make sure you have a good foundation I recommend rotating the underlay 90 degrees on fills and use a density of 15-20 spi full lattice, and a contour underlay of .02 inset. I usually set my density to 55 spi when working with fleece.   When working with text or satin stitches I recommend using a perpendicular underlay, and high compensation for the columns, when using underlay opposite of the stitch direction it will minimize the distortion.   When outsourcing digitizing, simply notify the digitizer the design will be embroidered on fleece. Hopefully your digitizer is experienced enough to make the proper adjustments. If not, you need to call the shots. Ask for a slight density increase and heavier underlay. Ultimately, you have to sew this design out and your customer needs to love it. Don’t be satisfied with anything short of what you need and your customer wants.   Quality Control   You will need to cut away the backing fairly close to the embroidery design, make sure their are no sharp edges, you will need to use water to remove the solvy or water soluble topping, I find a gentle brush and spray bottle work best. This will also remove any marks made by the hoop, I like to brush opposite to the stretch , fleece is very forgiving on hoop marks and removing soluble topping don't be afraid of using enough water.   Stock Embroidery Designs   Often stock machine embroidery designs will work with fleece often they will be a bit heavy and you made need a heavier backing to support the garment however use the topping.

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Tajima Pulse experience: Organizing design Part 2

  Organizing your Designs in DG15   At the end of last year Pulse Microsystems launched their newest version of their embroidery digitizing software, its called TAJIMA PULSE DG15 this program while it looks the same as DGML by Pulse 14 their is a lot of changes under the hood. Which makes organizing your designs easier and it even expands it for getting access to your designs on the road, at home or at other pc in your shop. This month we are going to introduce you to some of these new tools.   DROP BOX   The drop box is a place for storing your embroidery designs and being able to access them from one pc to another is a smart add on to the TAJIMA PULSE DG15, when I worked for Pulse in the support department this was one thing they asked for all the time. This allows you the freedom to share designs from one work station to another, as long as they both have TAJIMA PULSE DG15 or access to the drop box. This options is included with TAJIMA PULSE DG15and makes for sharing embroidery designs from one computer to another very easy.   When you get TAJIMA PULSE DG15 you can register your product and get the Dropbox function activated which allows you to install a program on your pc and it sync with drop box so if you save an updated version it will sync with the online account., I use this when I need to sew designs up as my Embroidery Machine is in another location. I can save my files for the day to my drop box and I can access them at the shop computer, reduces the need for carrying a flash drive or forgetting a file. You get 2GB worth of storage, so you can store a large number of designs, and if you need more space you can purchase it. I use this feature all the time since upgrading in December to TAJIMA PULSE DG15.   VIEWING FILES   In the past to view files on your computer you either had to import them into librarian or browse via the open window, and when you found one you could click on it to view it. TAJIMA PULSE DG15 allows you to see all your PXF files in Windows Explorer I do not need to have TAJIMA PULSE DG15 open just the key plugged in.   Above you can clearly see the designs files in this folder . if you have a lot of PXF this way of viewing your embroidery designs is very easy, once you find the file you want just double click it and it opens up in TAJIMA PULSE DG15 I didn't know about this prior to me upgrading the only down side of this option is it only works with PXF files, I wish it would work with DST and other file formats.   PULSE CLOUD   Another innovative technology is to move the software to a whole new realm, Mobility, with the use of Pulse Cloud you now can access your design library on mobile devices, laptops and anywhere you have the internet. This is a standard option in the TAJIMA PULSE DG15 packages and is available to all levels. For customers that already have the design spooler and newer LAN based machines they can even send designs to the queue, monitor jobs in the que, and even get some reports on the machines.   This option allows you to view the designs on your mobile devices, and or another computer, if your machine is networked via ethernet cable you can send the design to the machine. I have not been able to test this yet, but I have used Pulse Cloud to show customers their designs in the field on my tablet. You can add comments, download the file on other pcs. share the design to Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest, In addition you can edit the text and more.   KEY FEATURES Browse Designs from any Device • Constant access to all your designs from any mobile device   Create New Designs • Use templates to create beautiful personalized embroidery designs   Monitor Machine Status • Keep an eye on your production floor from anywhere   Send to Machine • Send a design straight to your embroidery machine from the Pulse Cloud   Viewing Thumbnails • Allows you to view thumbnails of all your PXF files in your folders without Pulse open

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Tajima Pulse experience: Organizing design Part 1

Machine embroidery design management When you enter into the embroidery business you will soon learn individual ways to track and organize your embroidery designs, some people use a specialty program, a filing systems on your computer, a database and other. Today we are going to take a look at organizing your designs with Librarian. This tool has been around for a while, while it has some limitations its a great tool for searching for designs. What is Librarian Librarian is a single user database that has been built into Tajima DGML by Pulse since version 11, the main structure of the database has not changed much over the years. This database allows you to store your PXF or a wide range of other stitch files. This database allows you to enter in information about the embroidery designs from vendor, special notes, it also keeps track of size, colors and more. You can search by a wide range of topics and or view the designs by image. It depends on how much type you want to spend setting it up. Where is librarian , it can be found at the top of your screen and is available on a wide range of levels.. This tool is one of the most ignored tools in your software, when I worked with Tajima Pulse most customers did not know that it existed or what it could do for them, not to mention that it also comes with the option of a 1000 machine embroidery designs to start up with. While the designs are free its up to you to add them if you want them. When opening your software for the first time and you open librarian it will prompt you to choose a BLANK Database or PREMIUM Database, If you choose blank it will not show you any designs until you add them , if you choose premium database it will give you 1000 machine embroidery designs. Menu Options If you click on the Librarian tab at the top of your screen you will get a menu similar to the one I have illustrated below. Open Design This allows you to visually view the embroidery designs in your database. Search This allows you to search by various fields if entered Save Design Manual way to add machine embroidery designs from your workspace to librarian Save Design as Same as above but allows you to make a different version of another design. Groups You can store embroidery designs in groups to catalog the embroidery designs easier Favorites Allows you to set embroidery designs up as favorites for quick reference Database info Path to the database for backing up and seeing how large your database is Import A option for mass loading your designs, however it doesn't enter any additional data Rebuild icons Sometimes the database will loose some image files, this option rebuilds the image files. Multiusers This is only available to users that purchased the items. Setting Librarian UP Prior to setting up your librarian for the first time you will need to make sure you have permission to allow your system to right to restricted areas of your computer. Librarian needs permission from your windows to access this area. Contact your local distributor for help with this if needed. Opening Designs When you click on the Open option in Librarian menu you will get the following screen . This screen is a bit confusing for some while it may seem like you can choose the various options, you need to setup your librarian to use these features, the easiest method for this window is leaving everything as default and clicking open., There one option you may want to look at the datatype, this will also depending on what file types you have in your database. The types included all embroidery files, stitch designs like DST, PSF and home embroidery formats, Outline files like PXF, POF, chenille embroidery designs and outline chenille designs. Stitch Files Stitch files do not retain the color information in embroidery designs, and have limitation on sizing and editing Outline Files These are the best files to save to librarian as they save all the editing information, and color info of designs, just like saving them to your system Chenille files are only available if you have a chenille embroidery machine. When you click open it will show your digitized embroidery designs in your window, depending on how large your window is will depend on how many designs it shows, also dependent on how many designs you have in the database as well. Opening a embroidery design To open a machine embroidery design you can just double click it and it will open up in Tajima DGML or you can right click to get more options, The main option you likely to use is the properties tab, but you can play around with the other options as well. GENERAL TAB This tab will tell you basic info about the design, including when it was made, name of the file, Design TAB This tab will show you information about the design including, Designer ID, Customer, Design dimension, stitch count, number of colors, number of trims etc. User Tags Optional, I have used these tabs to hold customer information, you can also add notes or special instructions to the file as well Color Information This tab will show you the color information of PXF and PSF and POF files but not dst files Attachments Optional, I use this if I store a customer logo , I attach the original artwork to the database file Groups Optional, you can add (1) embroidery design to several different groups. Dog design can be added to a Dog group or an animal group. Mass Load This option is listed as Import , but its basically a option of loading multiple designs at one time. This is a very taxing process for the computer as it has to generate alot of information for your files, You should do this when you do not need the machine for any other embroidery digitizing software task. To use this option click the file types you want to add, choose the location where the embroidery designs are and click next and it will begin uploading you may also get a note that your embroidery program is not responding, ignore this and come back later. When its done your screen will go back to the original window, Now you can go back into Librarian and see the machine embroidery designs you have added, Now if you the import option you will need to add other details to each file if you want to know the vendor etc. Searching Embroidery Designs If you mass load , you will not be able to search all the fields, unless you edit each file. when you search for a machine embroidery design you can search by the following criteria General Tab Design ID Optional , this needs to be manually added Customer Optional , this needs to be manually added Description Optional , this needs to be manually added General Key Optional, but rarely used Status Default is Production Designs Tab Designer ID Optional , needs to be added Customer Optional , needs to be added Desing Dimensions Size of the design Atributes Stitch Count, colors, trims, jobs etc,. There are some other tabs but blank by default If you want the information to be all added its best to add designs as you use them , or several a day in your free time.

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Digitizing Series Thread thickness and digitizing

  Thread Thickness and Digitizing Techniques When digitizing or adding a new embroidery thread type to your system, you can also input the desired thickness of that thread. this helps when trying to determine the coverage of a fill on a large area.   A bit of back ground the industry standard thread weight for most industrial shops is 40wt this has the best coverage on standard logos and works with a widest variety of applications. However there are specialty areas that can get better results when working with other areas.   Small Diameter 60 wt Threads When working with small diameter threads you can use smaller needles like a 65/9 needle this allows for more detail and less bulk, applications that this excels at is small lettering under 4 mm or .25 of inch. The thread thickness is half the size of the standard thread and the needle is considerably smaller allowing for more needle penetration in a very small area, 60 wt threads are also commonly used in the craft and home embroidery segments, there is a wide range of colors available in this wt and often you get get 5000 m spools as well. In the example below you can see that we made very small text , using standard Pulse Microsystems Fonts. These fonts are specially designed for small lettering and have the underlay and compensation built in,   Large Diameter 20 pr 30 wt Threads   When working with large fills where you want to cover a wide are on a jacket or what to keep the density to a minimum then you may want to consider using a large needle and larger size embroidery thread. There are quite a few applications where you can substitute a larger embroidery thread but working on jackets like leather that rip when putting too many needle penetrations in the embroidery design using a larger needle and larger thread reduces the amount of needle penetration but allows for great coverage. It also reduces the puckering of the fabric.   In the example below you will see a design that is made by Campus Crew a Canadian Company that excels in using large threads. They use it to cover large areas with stitches and they also use it for effect on applique designs as well.   Changing thread thickness   When you need to change thread on your embroidery machine you should also change the thickness in your embroidery digitizing software so the appearance of the embroidery designs is correct, this will give you a visual que on how dense or how much detail to add. Its often over looked in the software when digitizing for these types of applications.   To change (1) color on demand without effecting the color chart follow steps below.   1. Right Click on the color 2. Goto Properties 3. Change the highlighted value   1. 20 wt thread very large thread 2. 30 wt thread 3. 40 wt thread default 4. 50 wt thread 5. 60 wt thread very small thread   This method changes the thread in the design only.. Its a great option for on demand digitizing for clients or embroidery designs when you normally do not work with the type of thread.   Author: Frank Prokator

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Tips n Tricks Adding a new thread chart

  Making Custom Thread Charts In Tajima DG/ML by Pulse there is a number of pre-installed thread charts however there are times where you need to create a custom chart with different thread thickness and or colors Thread Charts and Thread Palettes Embroidery Thread charts are a collection of embroidery thread and color information. Tajima DG/ML by Pulse has thread charts installed that contain information on threads from many thread manufacturers. Threads from a selected thread chart are displayed in the lower right hand side of the Tajima DG/ML by Pulse workspace. Clicking the plus (+) sign at the edge of the thread chart list will allow you to change the selected thread chart for the current design. Creating a New Thread Chart The Thread Table Editor allows you to create and edit thread charts. 1. Open a new document2. Goto Tools , click on Manage and choose thread charts,. Click NEW This will open a new tab , so you can add different threads. Once your screen opens you can now start to add new threads to your chart. Please note you will need to know what thickness the embroidery thread is , they type of thread, have the color codes, and Manufacturer info. Normally available on the color thread chart 4,. To add a new thread color click EDIT and click NEW THREAD 5,. Fill in the fields on the screen.   Name ­- The name of the new thread color (such as Royal Blue or Snow White) Manufacturer- The name of the manufacturer of the thread chart that contains this embroidery thread. Code - The manufactures code number for the thread. This is a unique code that manufacturers use to identify the thread. A embroidery thread code is usually used to identify a thread when placing an order with the manufacturer. Thickness - The thickness setting is a number used to define the thickness of the thread. 1. 20 wt thread very large thread 2. 30 wt thread 3. 40 wt thread default 4. 50 wt thread 5. 60 wt thread Very small Type - The type setting is used to describe the type of material used to make the thread. Examples are Cotton, Rayon, Metallic, Nylon and Polyester. Color - There are three different values used to define the color of the thread that is displayed. These values represent the amount of red, green and blue color that make up the color of the embroidery thread. These values, called RGB, are standard values for representing colors for computers. Clicking the Choose button will allow you to select from a list of basic colors or allow you to create a custom color. Once a color is selected, the RGB values for the selected color will be displayed in the color values. Repeat step 4 until all the colors have been added. Saving your Thread Chart When you have added all your threads now you need to save the file . 5. Goto File, choose SAVE AS , add your file name and it will add it to your charts folder. Now prior to accessing the chart you will need to close your Pulse Program and reopen it .   Author: Frank Prokator

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Specialty embroidery threads and Applications

Specialty Threads In the embroidery industry we often encounter issues with specialty embroidery threads, and or applications these sometimes require special threads, backing, and needles. Metallic Threads When working with Metallic threads you will notice that they have fibers wrapped around a core, which may be nylon, polyester, or rayon. This can cause issues when using standard needles and you may need to look at the following tips. below. 1. Use needle with a large eye 2. Use if possible a 80/12 needle 3. Loosen your tension for that needle 4. Slow your machine down 5. Reduce your bobbin tension 6. Designs should be made for metallic threads 7. Metallic thread works best as an accent thread color FIRE RETARDED THREAD We use fire retardant Nomex™ and Kevlar™ for sewing designs and attaching patches to clothing and gear used by first responders, race car drivers, and others who need protection from fire and heat. This embroidery thread does not melt and can withstand temperatures of 700єF (366єC) before it decomposes. It has a flat, cotton-like finish. Both Nomex and Kevlar give the same protection. Please note you should use a backing that will work for this application too WATER PROOF EMBROIDERY It is now possible to embroider on waterproof or water-repellent fabrics without compromising their waterproof properties. Just apply THERMOSEAL to the back of your embroidery and water and moisture will not penetrate the fabric through the tiny embroidery needle punctures. Rain gear, outdoor jackets, functional clothing can be embroidered and everybody stays dry-use on work clothes e.g. for road construction, gardening and for all outdoor jobs. You will need a heat press for this backing. Gulnold Thermoseal seals all holes caused by the needle.. PERFORMANCE BACKING ActionBack is an exciting new cut-way product that is exclusive to Gunold. It is highly effective backing for stabilizing stretchy, slippery garments like today's popular performance wear. Stable in both directions, ActionBack will prevent drifting outlines, puckering and pooching.This takes the worry about jobs that sag or pucker even though the design works fine on other fabrics. I still recommend a small needle , the smallest hoop the design fits into and do not stretch the fabric. Soft and Sheer Fabrics Gunold's cut-away Soft n' Sheer embroidery stabilizer is a textured, non-woven, spun-bonded nylon embroidery backing that it is most popularly used as a knitwear backing. Soft 'n Sheer embroidery backing is multipurpose and is available in both black and white. This style of backing is great for active wear on dance uniforms, where conventional backing or stitches can irritate the skin. it has a soft feal and offers great support for the embroidery designs. GLOW N THE DARK THREADS Who doesn't love things that glow in the dark? Gunold offers two glow-in-the-dark embroidery thread options. You'll find "Glowy" luminous embroidery thread and "Fluor" fluorescent embroidery thread both have the same high quality as all our products. Both are designed specifically for multi-head embroidery machines. Fluor is a white thread, while Glowly comes in seven different embroidery thread colors. While both threads can be used as a fun and decorative touch for a wide-range of applications, such as Halloween costumes and stage costuming, they also have a practical, durable application. There are always new products coming out that can make your designs stand out , there are now new threads coming out that change color in sunlight, glow in the dark colors, transparent threads and much more, If you can image it , likely someone has it . NO SHOW BACKING Another product that is great to have in your shop, is no show backing, this backing makes designs appear like they are floating on the shirt, it works well on light color shirts where you need a cutaway backing but you don't want to see the backing through the shirt,often you will see a square or shadow on the shirt on light fabrics. BLACK BACKING Another tip black backing works great on dark colors as it not as obvious as white, its great thing to have in your shop works well on sweaters, t-shirts and jackets when their is no pocket and you do not want to see the white backing on the inside. Black backing cost a bit more but customers would appreciate the effort. Author:: Frank Prokator

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