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Beautiful design, Morning owl look amazing.

This embroidery work up perfectly and stitch out nicely. 
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Excellent stitches and original style

Stitched out beautifully! Looked amazing and no issues!
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Loving birds.. Wonderful designs, stitched out beautifully

Really cute, You love this when you stitched it. Would love more of same designs.
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Our designs looks great

Stitched out beautifully! Wonderful decoration!
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Adorable design. Stitches out beautifully.

"Thanks so much for this design It's lovely and stitched out beautifully on leather."
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    Creating an Easter decoration with the help of ScanNCut

    Creating an Easter decoration with the help of ScanNCut
    Create an Easter decoration with the help of the ScanNCut machine. It’s fun and quick, and the result will look nice. The children will duly appreciate the magic world that pops up on your windowsill. You can cut the original decoration out of scrapbook paper. Read the following tutorial to learn how to use the machine, to cut the details, and to arrange them. You can download the designs, too.
    For this job, you’ll need:
    ScanNCut, an electronic cutting machine Standard cutting mat Scrapbook paper Files for cutting Creating an Easter decoration with the help of ScanNCut: the bunnies
    Load the designs onto USB and open them on the cutting machine. Customize the blade length and depth according to the manual. Apply your paper to the mat and do the test run. Cut.

    Each bunny consists of 2 parts. Join the parts together.


    The carved egg
    Load the designs and open them on the machine. Change the size if you want. Cut out the details, join them, pass the ribbon through, and tie the ends in a bow.




    The fence
    Load the designs and open them on the machine. Change the size if necessary.


    Cut. Glue the rails and fold along the dotted lines.


    Your holiday decoration is ready! Put it on the windowsill. Happy Easter!


    Original text by Olga Milovanova

    Decorative pillow: machine embroidery with alignment

    Decorative pillow: machine embroidery with alignment
    Not only is a present for a loved one, created with your own hands and in accordance with his or her tastes and preferences, a value-in-itself, but the attention you show in that way makes it even more valuable. Which item is simplest to create, even for a person who doesn't engage in handicraft? A decorative pillow, of course. There is a great variety of them, from a simple sole-colored pillow made of linen or cotton to the ones decorated with appliqué, embroidery or a pattern formed by beads or sequins. In this tutorial, I’ll show you how to do machine embroidery with alignment.
    You’ll need:
    Fabric Upper thread Underthread Stabilizer Tailor's chalk or water-soluble marker Stick the tearaway adhesive stabilizer to the wrong side of the fabric. With a water-soluble marker or chalk, mark the center and the horizontal and vertical axes on the fabric (blue lines in the picture).

    Trace the patterns in the corners of the future pillow. Hoop the fabric and embroider the first part of your design (the upper left corner).


    During the embroidery, I recommend doing your patterns in the following order: upper left corner, then upper right, lower right and lower left. Every time you rotate your design by 90 degrees clockwise.
    Having embroidered the first part of the design, use the plastic template that comes with your machine to hoop the next parts.
    Thanks to the “Display fabric while aligning the embroidery position” option in Brother Innov-is 1E, you can check the positioning accuracy without the alignment stitches/crosses.



    Cutting out and assembling the pattern
    For the front side of your pillow, cut out a square size 36 x 36 cm (that includes seam allowance) out of the embroidered fabric. After that, cut out two rectangles size 36 x 19 cm for the back side.
    Inserting a zipper under the placket
    Pin or baste the zipper tape to the longer sides of the rectangles, install a zipper foot and stitch.



    Add piping along the perimeter of the front or the back panel of the pillowcase. Start and end at the bottom of the future pillow, matching the edges of the fabric and the piping with approximately 2 cm overlap.
    Cover the panel with the piping with the panel without, their right sides facing each other, and stitch perimeter-wise; add a few back stitches in the places where you zipper is. Finish the edges with overlock.



    Press the pillowcase and turn it the right sight out. Put your pillow into it.

    The new pillow is ready!
    Original text by Irina Lisitsa

    Pinpoint: Perfect design placement on Bernina machines

    Pinpoint: Perfect design placement on Bernina machines
    Hi friends!
    Should you ask me 5 or 7 years ago, what are the main points when choosing an embroidery machine, I would undoubtedly say, “The size of the machine frame and your wallet.” Today I will answer, “Look at the what the machine can do!”
    Contemporary home embroidery machines are reaching their limit as regards the hoop/frame size. You cannot infinitely enlarge the embroidery area and stay affordable for the majority of people. You need to find other ways.
    One of those is to add to the machine’s functionality.
    Pinpoint Placement, the perfect alignment of the parts of the embroidery, is exactly what an embroiderer needs. No size limit. Split up – Position – Go!

    This information is meant for those who are planning to buy or have already bought a Bernina sewing and embroidery machine, but hasn’t yet explored all its capabilities. Today we’ll talk about a Pinpoint Placement option that allows you to position the design on a garment with accuracy to one mm, and also to align different parts of the design and embroider designs several times larger than your hoop. The most perfect examples are the border designs, replicated again and again.
    Pinpoint Placement is an option available in some Bernina models: Embroidery machines: Bernina 700, Bernina 500; Sewing and embroidery machines: Bernina 590, Bernina 790Plus, and Bernina 880Plus. This is how it’s done. You decide where on the garment you’ll place the future embroidery. With chalk or a marker, draw two positioning points. Now hoop the garment not bothering about the exact placement. The main thing is to match the size of your design with the embroidery area. Then the magic starts.
    You pick the necessary design in your machine. Touch the PinPoint button, then activate the Grid and choose two of the nine positioning dots. You will align the needle with the chosen positioning points. To do this, rotate the Multifunction Knobs until the needle will be in the right position, directly above your mark. Fix the position by touching Set.
    t.  Now, let’s align the needle with another of our two dots. Choose the other one of our two points and rotate the Multifunction Knobs until the needle will be right above the mark on the garment. Done. Now you can do the embroidery. There is also free point positioning. Here you mark a random spot on your garment, touch the right spot on the design, rotate the Multifunction Knobs until the needle is directly above the mark. Then repeat with the second positioning dot.
    Original text by Lisa Prass

    Embroidery techniques: Sewing a pumpkin-shaped pincushion

    Embroidery techniques: Sewing a pumpkin-shaped pincushion
    Internet has an endless supply of ideas. For a long time I’ve been creating round pincushions, simple and artless. And then I suddenly read that by tying it up with a cord, you can turn a round pincushion into a sort of pumpkin. And so cute it seemed to me that I’ve only been using the pumpkin pincushion in my work ever since. Besides, people now only ask pumpkin-shaped pincushions for presents.


    Sewing a pumpkin-shaped pincushion. Materials
    Sole-colored cotton Tearaway adhesive stabilizer Upper thread Underthread Scissors Decorative button or bead Cord or mouline threads Batting (wool, polyester, quilting cotton) Machine embroidery design
    Sewing a pumpkin-shaped pincushion. The making process
    If you have bought a design in the store or created it by yourself, hoop the fabric and hit the start button. I secured cotton with a tearaway adhesive stabilizer (it is my favorite–so easy to work with).

    You’ll need to stitch the design twice. You can make the sides identical or use two different color schemes. You can also spare the flowers and only embroider the circle on the lower side. The bottom half can do without the embroidery.

    When the embroidery is finished, remove the stabilizer and cut the upper and lower panels along the stitching, leaving seam allowance. Sew them together by hand, like biscornu, catching the back stitches with your needle. When only a small gap is left, stuff your pincushion through it.

    You can cover the stitching between the two halves of the pincushion with a cord, carefully sewing it along.
    Near the end, insert a cord or several mouline strands into the eye of a needle and wrap it around the pincushion. I usually divide mine pincushions into 8 parts. You can do less or more, whichever suits you best. Having done that, pass your needle through the center of the pincushion and fix the thread on both sides. To disguise the knot, cover it with a decorative button.

    Done! The actual making and assembling takes much less time than you may think from the description. Try it! You’ll definitely make it.



    Original text by Mary Stratan

    Embroidering a pocket: Kitteh

    Embroidering a pocket: Kitteh
    This adorable and perky kitteh captivated me the moment I’ve seen the design. Lisa Prass, who created it, suggested giving some volume to this cutie. Read on to know what became of it.
    For a long time, I've had a soft spot for felines. When I was a child, I used to bring home kittens in my pockets, and they peeked out just like the one does in the design, which I instantly named KitteH.
    The embroidery took very little of my time. For it, I needed the design rendered in the Photostitch technique, an embroidery machine, a pair of jeans with pockets (a pocket flap, too, fell victim to the Kitteh’s charms and was pitilessly ripped off), embroidery threads, and, of course, the cheerful mood.
    First of all, I ripped off the pocket flap; in case your jeans come without one, skip this. After that, I undid the seam (the ordinary, not the decorative one). It was the inner seam in my case.

    I conceived my Kitteh puffy, and now was time to think how to add the volume. Having discussed the matter with the creator, I decided to embroider the cute kitten’s paw separately.
    I embroidered the paw on organza stabilized with the solvent stab and understood that it was too soft.
    Having tried several options, I finally chose the three-layer “sandwich” that consisted of a solvent stabilizer, fine mesh fabric, and organza as my base fabric.



    The embroidery took about 15 minutes. While the machine was going, I had time for a cup of coffee. That’s why I love machine embroidery: the machine is doing the work while I rest :-) 

    Having stitched the paw, I trimmed it close to the stitching, washed out the stabilizer under the tap, and finished the organza edges with a lighter. The paw was ready!
    Now was the time to embroider the rest of my kitteh.
    I hooped the tearaway stabilizer. I should note that denim is quite stable as it is, so I don't reinforce it with adhesive stabilizers as a rule. With a temporary spray adhesive, I glued my denim piece to the stab and pinned it for better security.


    Using a layout grid and the machine’s display, I aligned the design to the pocket entrance. I checked the hooping accuracy with an outline, marking the place where the paw would go.



    Then I changed the thread color and stitched the paw to the main part.



    After that, the kitteh’s body and head were embroidered.



    All done. Some time, a good mood and an embroidery machine were all it took.

    Easy stitching to you all and have a good day!

    Original text by Irina Lisitsa
    Design available here 
     

    Felt bag decorated with machine embroidery

    Felt bag decorated with machine embroidery
    Felt is a wonderful fabric. You can decorate items with it or use it for sewing bags. I sewed this bag without a ready pattern or complicated calculations, by the eye. My pattern consisted of three rectangular panels and two stripes, cut out of felt. The bag was embellished with machine embroidery and decorative trim. A tip: you can choose any other machine embroidery design from our shop and make your bag look casual or romantic.

    Felt bag decorated with machine embroidery. Materials
    Decorative felt Bright cotton fabric Tearaway nonadhesive stabilizer Water-soluble stabilizer (film) Upper thread Underthread Machine embroidery design Embroidery or sewing and embroidery machine Embroidery machine hoop and template Felt bag decorated with machine embroidery. Embroidery process
    Out of felt, cut a rectangle size 18 x 22 cm. This will make a panel for your future bag. You’ll need three such panels. Two of them will make the bag, and the third will become a flap cover.


    Hoop the cutaway nonadhesive stabilizer, sprinkle it with a temporary spray adhesive and press the felt to it. Cover the felt with a piece of water-soluble film. In the embroidery editor, add a basting stitch outline to the design. 
    Load the design into your embroidery machine and hit the start button.


    I used a common polyester thread; though it is not recommended for machine embroidery as a rule, you can use it in some cases. After you've used cotton or polyester threads, clean the shuttle thoroughly.



    Change the thread colors in accordance with the chart.


    Felt bag decorated with machine embroidery: sewing
    Before joining the panels, remove the water-soluble stabilizer: it will tear easily after the embroidery. Round the corners of the two panels constitute the bag. Round the corners of the panel intended for the flap. Finish the edge with decorative trim.


    Cut out a strip of fabric 4 cm wide to make a strap for your bag. Adorn it with a strip of fabric or decorative trim. Out of the fabric, cut out the lining. Turn in the seam allowance on the edges and baste.


    Attach the two parts of a magnetic clasp to the front side of the bag and the flap. Lay the lining and the flap together with their wrong sides facing each other and tack them down in order to avoid shifting during stitching.



    You may sew from the front or the back. When joining the panels, use a hemmer foot or an omni-purpose foot. Stitch your flap to the back side of the bag.



    Cut out a strip 6 cm wide for the side. Stitch this strip first to the back side of the bag, then to the front. Before sewing the felt panels, baste them first.



    Your felt bag decorated with machine embroidery is ready!



    Original text by Irina Lisitsa

    How to embroider hard-to-reach areas of clothing?

    How to embroider hard-to-reach areas of clothing?
    If you like one-of-kind jeans or wish to revamp your favorite pair, you can do it with comparative ease, using just an embroidery machine and your imagination. In this article, I’ll tell you how to embroider the pocket of jeans thus turning them into something original.
    Small items of clothing, such as jeans’ pockets, belts, straps, yokes, cuffs are somewhat difficult to embroider, being impossible to hoop. There are, however, some ways of doing it quickly and easily. I’ll be happy to tell you about them!
    For the embroidery, you’ll need:
    Embroidery machine or sewing and embroidery machine, Your favorite pair of jeans, Embroidery stabilizer (Filmoplast adhesive paper by Gunold will do nicely.), Embroidery threads of the necessary color (Madeira Rayon #40 or Gunold Poly #40), Bobbin thread of the same color as the fabric (Amman Belfil C #120), Thick threads for the jeans, same color as the stitchout (Madeira Aerofil #35), Machine embroidery needles of the corresponding thickness, with a reinforced blade (Schmetz Jeans), Embroidery needle (Schmetz Embroidery #90). First, rip off the pocket and iron it, removing the excessive threads. Carefully inspect your pocket to see whether it has any metal eyelets or decorative stitching. A layout grid comes with your embroidery machine. With it, you may position the design on the pocket the way you like. If there eyelets and rivets in that place, they should be removed so as to save your needle from breaking during the embroidery. If you don’t need the decorative stitching as part of your design, rip it off. Press the pocket with an iron once again.

    Prepare the stabilizer and the hoop. Filmoplast is an embroidery stabilizer with an adhesive layer covered with paper.

    Hoop it with the paper layer facing up. Position your pocket on top of it and jot down the placement marks with a marker. If you only embroider one pocket, it’s better to place it in the center of the hoop.

    In order to attach our pocket before the embroidery, you’ll need to remove the upper layer of the stabilizer (the paper one). Gently peel off the paper and press the pocket onto the adhesive area between the marks.

    You’re now done with the preparation. You may proceed to the embroidery. It is crucial to correctly position the design in the hoop because the entire design has to fit in.
    I used my Husqvarna Designer sewing and embroidery machine. Its full-color touch panel display allows you to choose an appropriate hoop (which now circumscribes your pocket) and position the embroidery where you want it. With the help of a layout grid in the hoop and another one on the touch panel display, it will be an easy job.

    You can check whether everything is correct by touching the design positioning button. On the screen, you’ll be able to see whether the design should be shifted a bit or rotated (see the manual that comes with your embroidery machine or ask the seller).
    Your embroidery is ready. Take the hoop off the machine. Carefully tear off your embroidered pocket from the stabilizer. It will be easy to do while still in the hoop because the needle soft of cuts it along the edges of the embroidery.


    You only need to iron the pocket and sew it back on.

    Thus, you have decorated your old jeans.

    With a sleight of hand and no fraud, you are now the owner of a one-of-a-kind pair of jeans! Wear it happily!
    Original text by Irina Yemelyanova

    Making patchwork quilt on the embroidery machine

    Making patchwork quilt on the embroidery machine
    Level: beginner.
    If you are fond of both quilting and machine embroidery, this tutorial is for you. Do want to make high-quality quilt blocks quickly? Patchwork quilt on the embroidery machine: high quality without painstaking and time-consuming work. Just a few easy steps will enable you to decorate your project with an ornate stitched pattern.
    Patchwork quilt on the embroidery machine: Materials:
    Upper fabric (front) Mid-layer (batting) Lower fabric (back) Upper thread Machine embroidery design (straight stitch) Visit our store to find a suitable embroidery design!
    Patchwork quilt on the embroidery machine: preparations
    Load the design into the embroidery machine or use the one from the memory. Activate the Basting option.

    Hoop the mid-layer only. For the mid-layer, you may use a high-loft polyester batting (150 gsm, two layers), cotton batting or any other kind of wadding for quilt. Choose your batting in accordance with your needs and the desired outer look of the ready item.

    In this tutorial, we’re going to quilt both the front and the back. In order to attain high quality and a beautiful back side, use identical upper and lower threads.

    Secure a piece of the backing fabric on the wrong side of the hoop with the help of a temporary spray adhesive. The wrong side of the fabric should face the batting. The piece of fabric should be approximately 5 cm larger than the ready quilt block on each side. When you make a quilt with the high-loft mid-layer, the covering fabric will get smaller, hence the shrinkage allowance.
    Patchwork quilt on the embroidery machine: machine embroidery
    Having attached the hoop to the machine, cover it with the fabric for the front, with its wrong side facing down. Hit the start button.
    With the Basting option turned on, all layers of the future block are first stitched together with a basting stitch. If your machine doesn’t have this option, create an outline with straight stitches no less than 7 mm long in any embroidery software. You will be able to use this outline for basting in your future projects.

    The outline comes first in the sewing order, before the design.


    After the embroidery is finished, you’ll have a ready quilt block. The front and back will look equally fine due to the identical threads.


    Original text by Irina Lisitsa

    Machine embroidery on T-Shirts: how to ace it

    T-shirts can be found practically in anyone’s wardrobe. They are soft, unpretentious and comfortable to wear. That is to say, unpretentious if you want them this way. A pretty embroidery design will make the simplest everyday item distinctive. At the same time, this simplest everyday item may prove a real challenge for an embroiderer.
    While this article was originally intended for beginners, it turned out that many seasoned embroiderers are afraid to tackle with T-shirts as well. And why? Because knits can be really tricky. Here are some tips that will help you tame them. 
    Buy a good T-shirt
    T-shirts are predominantly made of cotton, but other kinds of fibers may be used as well—rayon, polyester, Lycra, linen, and various blends. They have slightly different properties, and there are also quality grades. Combed cotton is softer than basic cotton, and Pima cotton, thanks to its extra-long fibers, is considered the finest of all. Not only T-shirts of finer quality wear better but they also pucker less. They also differ in weight. Heavier fabrics are preferable for fibers in them don’t warp as much as in the lighter ones.
    Pre-launder 
    Wash your T-shirt before starting an embroidery project. Cotton shrinks after laundry and your design might get badly distorted.
    Choose a good backing
    T-shirts are washed on a regular basis, therefore, the stab should be stiff enough to keep the embroidery in shape while not making a garment too uncomfortable to wear. Cutaway stabilizer is preferable because it doesn’t deteriorate as quickly as the tearaway one in the course of time. The fusible mesh is, probably, the best option. 
    To hoop a T-shirt, cut a piece of stab larger than your hoop, sprinkle it with a temporary spray adhesive or use a glue stick, press your T-shirt to it and hoop the whole thing. Don’t forget that a stretchy fabric should never be drum-tight in the hoop! If you are afraid of the hoop burn, try to hoop the stab and glue your T-shirt to it. If you don’t have any special devices, the embroidery will require some acrobatics but it is possible. 
    After you’ve finished the embroidery, remove the excess stabilizer by cutting it close to the stitching. If you have sensitive skin, covering the back side with fusible tricot interfacing might help.
    Use a topper 
    Additional stabilization will make the embroidery look neat. Cover the embroidery with a piece of thin water-soluble film and baste it. The extra film will come off easily when rinsed with water. 
    Always do a test-stitch
    Unless you’ve embroidered this design before, on the same equipment and with identical consumables, it’s won’t hurt to try it first. The fabric should be similar to the one you’re going to use for your project. A tip: keep your old T-shirts, they will make a fine testing range.
    Select a lighter design
    Heavy designs with a large stitch count often look and feel like a patch. Thin and delicate knitted fabric cannot support the dense stitching at the edges; there will be wrinkles no amount of ironing will remove. Lighter designs with open structure are better for T-shirts.
    Use the right needles and threads
    You’ll need a ballpoint needle that doesn’t cut through the fibers but gently pushes them to the sides. The smaller the tip, the better. Use 70/10 needle for lightweight fabrics, and 80/12 for heavier ones.
    For T-shirts, one should select a durable thread that will be able to withstand repeated washings without losing its strength, color or luster. Polyester threads meets all these requirements and is, therefore, the best choice.
    Tack before the embroidery
    Basting the whole thing prior to the embroidery will provide yet more stabilization. It keeps the water-soluble topping in place and also prevents the lower stabilizer from shifting.
    Press the embroidery from the back
    Having finished the embroidery, turn the T-shirt out and press it from the back side with an iron. Apply pressure gently, don’t make the iron too hot and use a pressing cloth.
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