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Beautiful design, Morning owl look amazing.

This embroidery work up perfectly and stitch out nicely. 
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Excellent stitches and original style

Stitched out beautifully! Looked amazing and no issues!
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Loving birds.. Wonderful designs, stitched out beautifully

Really cute, You love this when you stitched it. Would love more of same designs.
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Our designs looks great

Stitched out beautifully! Wonderful decoration!
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Adorable design. Stitches out beautifully.

"Thanks so much for this design It's lovely and stitched out beautifully on leather."
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  • Irina

    Embroidery Stabilizers: Do You Really Need Them All?

    By Irina

    Original text by: Marina Belova I have once written a guide to all sorts of embroidery stabilizers (fusible interfacing materials) for manual embroidery. As we all know, the market is full of such auxiliary materials, which can be helpful to an embroiderer. Nevertheless, in these days I often think that not all of them are useful for me in my day-to-day work.  In the past I used to buy a lot of stabilizers of various brands, to see if they could be really helpful. I liked some of them and disliked the others; there were also certain products that I didn't know how and where to use even after having read the manual. In the course of time, after I gained some experience, it turned out that 3 or 4 types of stabilizer were sufficient for me to make a good embroidery. They really are enough for everything I embroider lately.  I'll show you what stabilizers I use for all routine projects and all types of fabric. I must specify though that the projects I do are rather simple: standard promotional designs on knitwear, terry cloth, occasionally caps, also ordinary materials like diagonal, coarse calico, two-thread cloth, sometimes the materials used in interior design, fore example silks and velvets of varying quality.  So, here's my basic embroidery stabilizer kit: 1.   Heavy-weight cutaway stabilizer (I wouldn't call it tearaway, like most of the sellers, because it doesn't tear that good), made in China. Density circa 60 g/m2. This stabilizer has a strongly pronounced fiber orientation, which isn't always good. Works fine for knitwear. Here it is: 2.   Medium weight cutaway stabilizer (some consider it tearaway) made in China or Turkey, density 35-40 g/m2. In my kit there is a cutaway stabilizer of 2 different brands, with and without fiber orientation (the last is my personal favorite). I use them for medium-level projects and ordinary textiles. Photo: an example of a stabilizer with single fiber orientation: And this is the one without any orientation: 3. A tearaway paper-like stabilizer, density circa 60 g/m2. It resembles recycled paper because it looks just as specked and non-uniform. I also have a punched-out variation of this paper, which also tears away easily. As it turned out, it comes in very handy when embroidering a design on terry cloth. But this paper-like stabilizer (and not only this one), as experience has shown, may be replaced by ordinary printing paper, which I sometimes do when it fits the size of design.  I rarely use other types of stabilizers, and usually as supplementary ones. 4. Thin water soluble film — a stabilizer topping for pile textiles, prevents the problem with pile piercing through the stitches. Nevertheless, I rarely use this film, too, but instead replace it with a stretch wrap or a plastic bag. I tested all the these materials in order to find a substitution for the expensive water soluble stabilizers, as I have already written. Water soluble stabilizers are used for lace and cutwork. There are also other types of auxiliary materials I use from time to time: Temporary spray adhesive Paper adhesive tape Double-sided adhesive tape And that's all there is to it. I don't keep a large variety of stabilizers. No spunbond, no heat away backing, no sticky backing paper-like filmoplast or other sticky embroidery stabilizers — I don't buy or use any of those. And even if I did buy some of them in the past, it was only for the purpose of examining them, because all these stabilizers can be replaced by their less expensive analogs. You can' have them all. Besides, if you embroidered on velvet using filmoplast as a stabilizer, it would turn out a real disaster, because filmoplast has a habit of taking the pile out, and it peels off easily, too. You have to be extremely careful with the projects that require a great number of stitches. Double-sided adhesive tape also tends to peel off the fabric.  Sometimes I think that everything new that pops up on the market is made with one goal in sight, and that is to induce customers to buy more and more materials. This happens because stabilizers become more and more differentiated, and not because they work better. It seems to me that the resulting embroidery is not always in connection with the price of a stabilizer and the innovations used in its making. What it depends upon is the quality of the design and the accuracy of hooping. Generally speaking, the resulting embroidery will be in strong connection with your experience in design making as well as handling different types of fabric and the embroidery machine.  Remember the general rule: the thinner the fabric, the thicker the stabilizer, however strange it might seem. You will get very soft lace using thermogaze, but it leaves residue which does not come off easily.  What stabilizers do you use in your work?
    • 4 comments
    • 7,566 views
  • diver361

    Embroidering on Carpet

    By diver361

    In some areas of leisure you will find niche markets, I have found one being able to make custom carpets for custom cars and sport fishing boats. So if you live near the water this is something you may want to offer, or if you have any car clubs in your areas. First you need to make a sample and bring it to car shows etc, or display it at your local dealers. Hi have done mats like the like the item Below, this was actually done for a young kids room.. As it was not going to be exposed to elements I was able to use some applique in the embroidery design. I have made over 20 specialized customer carpet sets for sport boats , custom cars and some other client that like items on carpets. I am also trying to break into the yacht market and embroider on carpets and seat covers. This is a niche market and I don't normally have standard pricing as you have to run your embroidery machine a lot slower it will take you twice as long to sew the designs, you will also go through more needles as once your done the job the needle are basically garbage, I would also recommend cleaning your embroidery machine between jobs the carpets give a fine dust that will get into the bobbin area when sewing. I have a small compressor right by the machine for blowing of the parts and lubricating. Most of my sets of carpets for a car go $250 to $400 and only quote on carpets for the trunk, I did one custom van and I had 5 carpets to do and I charge the customer $1200 for the job. When embroidering on carpets, you should be aware that conventional hoops will not be able hoop a carpet & that your embroidery machines arms will not support the weight on its own. I would recommend if you have a table raise it up to support the carpet. I use large clamps metal clamps to clamp it to the bottom sides of the embroidery machine arms, I found if you clamp it to the top it will stress the needle too much. I also recommend the following tips for sewing on carpets. Use a 80/12 Titanium needle with a sharp point as regular needles will get dull from punching through the carpet backing. All designs must be digitized for carpets as there are special requirements for the embroidery designs . Slow your machine down to a minimum of 400 rpm If its a Plush carpet please use topping this will prevent the presser foot from catching the nap of the carpet and or pulling out a strand or fiber of the carpet. Shave the outer edge of the carpet to prevent the nap from folding over the designs makes it look cleaner I use a Peggy stitch eraser If you want to sew you will either need to have the embroidery design made for carpets, keep in mind that you may run into problems if the embroidery design is not made properly. I purchased a used Merro embroidery machine to make custom carpets to fit the application and allows you to purchase bulk carpet for the application, If you have to purchase carpets that are customer made for the vehicle you will have to get in contact with the vendor. Another options is to sew through the rubber backing however doing this requires a great deal of patients and often frustrate you more than not however it can be done, If you consider attempting this you will need to use 110 needle and 40 weight polyester thread and slow your machine down. In addition between carpets check for needle damage and clean the needles blow of the dust from the embroidery machine. You also will need a industrial sewing machine for this option. Remember anything is possible however there is a learning curve when venturing into new areas.
    • 2 comments
    • 5,090 views
  • Irina

    How to Evaluate The Thread Tension by Sight And What To Do About It

    By Irina

    Original text by: Marina Belova One would think that evaluating of tension of the thread is such an old chestnut. But no, last week it came as a revelation to me. It is strange that such an essential information is practically non-existent on the internet, whereas manuals only contain the instructions on how to do the most basic things. And it is such a shame, really.  So, everybody knows (including me) that after the embroidery has been completed, the backside of a perfect satin-stitch column should look like this: 1/3+1/3+1/3 (upper + under + upper). If the column is divided differently, it means that you need to adjust your upper thread tension or the under-thread tension on your bobbin case.  I shall be honest with you, I don't see this ideal picture often, certainly not all the time. Velles 15 is notorious for getting the thread tension wrong, of which I've written many times, and was supported by the others. But there is a problem with the dial itself, which is pretty crude and, consequently, lacks the possibilities the Velles 19 dial has. But no matter how the dial was made, you have to adjust it all the time. The question is, how do you do it? Sometimes it's quite difficult a task to adjust it properly.  As it happens, you have to act wisely. First of all, I'll show you the most typical occasion which happens all the time when I use my Velles 15, and which has always puzzled me. These are my real works, not the test pieces:  As it turns out, this irregular outcome of the bobbin thread is a mark that something is wrong with a bobbin case. Is it either bent or damaged.  To check this just lay the bobbin case with the bobbin inside onto the table or any other flat surface with bobbin facing down. Then pull at the thread, holding the case slightly and allowing the bobbin to uncoil freely. It the thread is not uncoiled smoothly, but jerkily, it is the sign that the bobbin case has been damaged, so that it is not round anymore. Most likely, it was dropped on the floor in the past. I have dropped it, of course, even more that once, but I never thought about the consequences.  To cut the long story short, you must have a spare bobbin case. Sometimes the jerking like that cannot be corrected in any other way. And now I'll tell you about two of the most typical examples.  a. The under-thread is just barely visible on the underside or not visible at all: In this case you will have to find time to run your machine through all those tension tests at least once  to find out what happens with every one of your needles. Here you can also see the perfectly emblematic old photo of the old I-test from the times when I already had huge problems with a bobbin case.  It turned out, to my surprise, that there are two ways of adjustment in this situation (this nuance of evaluation of the test results is hardly mentioned at all):  •    If such is the situation with all or nearly all of your needles, loosen the under-thread tension. 
    •    But if this happens only with 2 or 3 needles, tighten the upper thread on them.  b. The under-thread on the underside is more than 1/3 column wide):  Again, run your machine through all the tests using every needle and see. And again you can get two different results:  •    If such is the result produced by all the needles, tighten the under-thread tension. 
    •    If you get it only with 2 or 3, loosen the upper thread.  That is basically all. I didn't know that it was so easy and used to regard thread tension tests with disdain. One should love their embroidery machine and care about it, so that it could reciprocate and minimize the number of unpleasant moment in the course of embroidery.  We have so much yet to learn.  P.S. A thought just popped in my head: what about single-thread embroidery machines that don't have a lot of needles, which can help you to compare their performance and understand what tension needs to be adjusted? How do you adjust the tension there? 
    Some of my readers suggest buying a special device that helps to adjust upper and under-thread tension. And what do you think?
    • 0 comments
    • 1,782 views
 

Fur Stitch Technique


Fur Stitch In Tajima DGML by Pulse there is an option which also come standard to allow you to make a stitch called a fur stitch. However I like the manual way which is available in many other levels. I will illustrate both in this document. Why should you use a fur stitch ? Well a fur stitch can be used as a layer to add depth to a embroidery design, here are a few examples where the embroidery design has a fur stitch as the base layer or as an accent. Example 1   Example 2 So what are the two methods ? Well in Tajima DGML by Pulse if you have Maestro level you will have the option to make a stitch called a fur stitch. This tool has some presets built into it . and here is what the tool stitch looks like. Here is what the satin tool option looks like both are very similar. Lower density is often associated with the fur stitch as its their to add texture.. When your using this technique your going to want to add a few layers of top stitches. Here are the next several layers.   These layers are made up of similar color palettes to allow blending on the colors using various patterns, densities and stitch types will allow you to make detailed designs. In this case the embroidery design used the fur stitch technique for all these layers, but at a lower density of 28 spi. In the above layers they used run stitches, and regular satin stitches to add the detail. After you pull all the data together you get one awesome machine embroidery design.   Author: Frank Prokator

diver361

diver361

 

Manual Applique


This week we are going to cover Manual Applique, this technique can be reproduced for jobs in production without the use of an inline cutter. All you need is a pair of scissors and some patience. ( This technique is great for those who DO NOT have an inline cutter ) Requirements You will need the following to make a design like these. - 13 inch Hoop - some felt - some time - scissors - digitizing software. - Fabric temp adhesive Step 1 Digitizing the embroidery design.   Load the design into your embroidery digitizing program, plan the design from that point. I like to add the black back ground behind the applique letters, You can exaggerate the black lines as the layered applique will hind them, I would also do all the text at this point as well. Next I would add the white, I would use either a run tool and a steil tool to tack down the white material. Note you will need to make a separate file to cut the material out use the run from the applique to stitch the material out, and then cut it out by hand. I would then digitize the Florida Gator design. I would do the F first with a solid fill and then put the orange over top with a steil border around the F , the green and then accent it with black. I would add pull comp and underlay for the lettering and the gator at .01 percent and full lattice under the whole guy, and then and a density of 65 spi. For those of you whom do not have a digitizing program but would like to sew out this design I have enclosed the design below.   Step 2 Manually cutting the design out When you sew the first run down on to the material take your time with very sharp scissors and stay true to the line as close as possible, any deviations from the line may lead gaps. Step 3 Hoop your Fabric Make sure when hooping the fabric its tight enough for the fabric and applique. Step 4 Embroidery Start the embroidery the first color is black and then start the second, it should put down a white placement stitch. Use fabric temp adhesive to hold the fabric in place while the top stitches go down. Step 6 Finish the design Here is what my applique design looked like, I sewed this on a orange t-shirt, with cutaway backing and used felt for the applique material. This technique can be applied to a wide range of embroidery designs, but if you had to stitch out this design with out the applique for a full sweater you would end up with 80-120 thousand stitches. Large embroidery designs can take a long time to sew out , applique can reduce this time as long as you can get the material cut to precise portions. I have recently starting using flock cut on my vinyl cutter for applique and I have much improved speed, and consistency. it also allows for seamless conversion , I export the file or use the vector file.   Author: Frank Prokator

diver361

diver361

 

Troubleshooting Designs ( Puckering )

Puckering (also known as cupping) is the gathering of material in an embroidery design which results in noticeable mounds of fabric and/or curled embroiderydesigns. This is undesirable in quality stitching and when it occurs, the cause of the problem should be determined and corrected. There are a number of factors which can contribute to puckering and they include: The embroidery design Often design stitch densities are simply too high and editing is required to reduce this density. A quality digitized design will produce a stitchout which compliments and flows with the garment .... not protect it, like a layer of armor.Insufficient or improper underlay stitching can also lead to puckering. Underlay stitches serve a number of purposes and one of them is to attach the material being stitched to the stabilizer before the actual top stitching begins. This helps to control some of the “push - pull” effect which will occur during stitching. Long stitch lengths tend to apply more “pull” to the material being stitched than short ones. Sometimes puckering can be reduced or eliminated by using shorter stitch lengths. For example, reduce 6 mm long stitches to 3 or 4 mm. Stitch direction can contribute to puckering. Embroidery designs having the majority of fill stitches running in the same direction or those that do not take into account the bias of the material being stitched, can produce puckering. If possible, direction of stitching should vary from one fill area to another and should run at an angle to the bias of the material. Improper patching can also cause puckering. Stitching the outside areas of the design first and working towards the inside can result in the material being “pushed up” in the center. Generally, it is best to have a design stitch from the center - out [as much as possible]. Stabilization Stitching without sufficient, proper stabilization can produce puckering [especially in lighter and/or problem materials]. As a general rule in embroidery, consider using a quality 2 - 3 oz. cut-away for most jobs because not only does the cut-away offer the best support during stitching, it also continues this support for the life of the garment. Switch to specialty stabilizers (tear-away, mesh, water solubles, etc.) only when the job warrants it. Hooping Using a large hoop for a small design can lead to excessive movement and shifting of material .... which in turn can result in puckering. In order to limit material movement and reduce the chance of puckering, always use the smallest hoop possible and when hooping, the material / stabilizer should be taunt [but not stretched] in the hoop. Embroidery thread tensions An embroidery machine with excessively high thread tensions can cause unnecessary “pull” on the material being stitched, which in turn can contribute to puckering. Properly tension ed, smooth, consistent running top and bobbin threads go a long way in creating a quality stitchout and help reduce problems like puckering. Materials being stitched Some materials [like nylon, silk, and light knits spandex and jersey materials simply tend to be more prone to puckering than heavier, more stable ones [denim, fleece, heavy cotton, etc.] and when working with these more problematic materials, the embroiderer will have to do all that they can to eliminate the potential for puckering. Proper editing of embroidery designs, good stabilization , good hooping practices and avoiding overly tight embroidery thread tensions all contribute to reduced puckering problems. Use the above information on puckering as a guide. However as with most things in embroidery, each job will offer its own variables and challenges which often need to be dealt with on an individual basis.

diver361

diver361

 

Digitizing for Chenille


Digitizing for Chenille Unlike in every day embroidery for Chenille your will want to make sure your artwork is formed properly, this means you should review the artwork tools in previous blogs these Tools as its vital that you have a good understanding on how to reduce nodes, split anchors, join anchors and edit nodes.The artwork converting process is also very demanding on your computer some computers even new ones can cash when converting complex designs. Computer Recommendations for Chenille Digitizers Its very important to have a well tuned digitizing computer, I recommend a Pentium 4 or equivalent Quad core computer with Windows 7 or Windows 8 64 Bit with 8 to 16 GB of ram. I also recommend the fastest chip and at least a 64 MB video card for working on Chenille. If your computer is not fast enough you will have a lot of idle time when converting your large file. When you have a vector file to convert check that all shapes are closed. Not doing this can sometimes cause undesirable results. Somes times it easier to convert them in sections versus the whole embroidery design. Chenille Basic Example Here is an image file and a Chenille Stitch file. Most Chenille digitizers choose to use the option of creating the art work first and convert it to chenille, I have found that most people who use chenille do the art of the design and convert each section on its own. Chenille Basic Example Step 1 Load the artwork into Tajima Image … Load Step 2 Trace the red outline Using the artwork tool trace the red make a duplicate of this for later Step 3 Convert the art work to Chenille Right click ..go to .. Convert segment too choose chenille Step 4 Turn off all but the Chain Walk See Below   You should now have a chain walk of the image. Chenille Basic Example Step 5 Highlight the artwork , right click , goto transform , Choose offset, Copy offset ,specify distance should be -.03 to -.05   Step 6 Manually add a color Change, Step 7 Convert the art work to Chenille Right click Go to Convert segment too choose chenille Step 8 Turn off all but the Chain Walk See FIG 4 previously for example Step 9 Add the Spiro Moss Fills of the areas indicate in white,again using the artwork Tool to draw with and convert it to Spiral Chenille Step 10 Make Sure you have 1 Chain and the Moss Fill should be Spiro Step 11 Now you need o trace the B with the artwork tool so the embroidery design looks like Below Setting should be similar   Author: Frank Prokator

diver361

diver361

 

Tajima Pulse learning: Chenille Part 3


Spiral Chenille Tool When you convert artwork to Spiral Chenille ( in Tajima Pulse Maestro embroidery digitizing software) or draw with the tool it will default below;   Spiral Chenille Properties   Order of the stitch types,   Spacing settings between the segments or chains   Moss Path Settings   Spiro Fill Settings   Chain Walk Tool   Moss Walk This tool allow you to draw standard Moss embroidery patterns or segments   Moss Walk Tools This tool allow you to draw standard Moss swirl patterns or segments   Here is the settings for controlling the swirl densities   Author: Frank Prokator

diver361

diver361

 

Tajima Pulse learning: Chenille Part 2


In the previous Introduction we covered some terminology, and some explanation of the different embroidery stitch types in this section we will look at the settings for those embroidery stitch types. Chenille General Tab Settings The General Tab for Lattice Chenille has a section called Before fill, Moss Fill and After fill. Section A Before the fill you can choose to have items a None, Chain, Moss depending on the embroidery design needs below shows the different items in the artwork, settings and how it should appear.   Section B The moss fill can be set to None, Contour, or Lattice.   Section C Here are the setting for after the fill   Line Spacing   Minimize Cross Runs for lattice option   Sew Sequence This option allows you to choose which segment sews first   Author Frank Prokator

diver361

diver361

 

Placement guide

General Information for placement When using the charts included in this document, the measurements are based on the following places to measure. (A) is the distance from the shoulder seem wear it meets the collar, down to the middle of the design.( is over from the center of the garment, if it has a zipper or buttons it should be measured from their. All measurements are in imperial system ( inches ) Recommended standard designs for a left chest should be around 2.25 inches high by 4.5 inches wide. Shirts with Pockets When working on garments that have pockets you may want to ignore the normal way of measuring as the design may not look appropriate. I center the embroidery design above the pocket usually about .5 inch and limit the design to a maximum of 2 high if not it will look to high on the shirt. Center it with the button hole on the shirt. When referring to the documentation its noted on the gender as this will impact the placement, typically its 5-7” (women) 6-9” (men) and 4-5” from the center.   ( A ) DOWN ( B ) ACROSS Men S 6” 4” Men M 6” 4” Men L 6 1/2” 4 1/2” Men XL 7” 5” MenXXL 7” 5” Ladies S 5” 4” Ladies M 5” 4” Ladies L 5 1/2” 4 1/2” Ladies XL 6” 5” Ladies XXL 6” 5” Crew Cut Sweaters or T-Shirts There is two places to sew embroidery designs on sweaters or T-Shirts, left chest or center of the chest.   ( A ) DOWN ( B ) ACROSS Men S 6” 4” Men M 6” 4” Men L 6 1/2” 4 1/2” Men XL 7” 5” Men XXL 7” 5” Ladies S 5” 4” Ladies M 5” 4” Ladies L 5 1/2” 4 1/2” Ladies XL 6” 5” Ladies XXL 6” 5” Center The center of the embroidery design should be parallel to where the bottom of the sleeves on tight fitted sleeves, on larger or loose sleeves the embroidery design should be 2” above the bottom of the sleeve. Hoodies When placing a design on the back , remember to adjust the designs location so the hood doesn't hide it. but on the front you can measure.   ( A ) DOWN ( B ) ACROSS Men S 6” 4” Men M 6” 4” Men L 6 1/2” 4 1/2” Men XL 7” 5” Men XXL 7” 5” Ladies S 5” 4” Ladies M 5” 4” Ladies L 5 1/2” 4 1/2” Ladies XL 6” 5” Ladies XXL 6” 5” Center The center of the embroidery design should be parallel to where the bottom of the sleeves on tight fitted sleeves, on larger or loose sleeves the design should be 2” above the bottom of the sleeve. Jackets When placing design on jackets take time to look for garments that have the embroidery pocket , it allows for most machine embroidery designs to be embroidered on left or right side. Looks professional when completed, and less chance of the hoop popping off and or hitting a zipper.   ( A ) DOWN ( B ) ACROSS Men S 6” 4” Men M 6” 4” Men L 6 1/2” 4 1/2” Men XL 7” 5” Men XXL 7” 5” Ladies S 5” 4” Ladies M 5” 4” Ladies L 5 1/2” 4 1/2” Ladies XL 6” 5” Ladies XXL 6” 5”   General rule for jacket backs When working on jackets you will need to also know where to place some larger embroidery designs on the back. This will depend on a few variables. Partial back 6 x 10” design 4” down Full back 10 x 10” design 3” down Caps When working with caps you should make sure that the design has been made to stitch from the center out, designs that haven't been digitized for this will often push off of center. Except when you get customer that want them off center. Depending on the type and size of your cap frame will depend on how large your designs can be, it also will depend on the cap your using. Average embroidery designs are 2.5" H and 4.5" W When embroidering logo on the back try to curve them to match the back curve of the cap, use a regular hoop for hooping. The Design should be 1.5" H x 3." W they can be large if the cap supports them. Special Materials When working on any special materials there is no set rules on where you can place it, however you have to be able to hoop it, I often sew on the front side of a hoodies 1 inch in, I use the Hoop tech clamping system which allows me to clamp very hard to hoop items including some of the following bags, towels and carpets straps and many other items. When sewing on bags you will need another method for clamping them. Here are some locations where you might sew some embroidery designs. Typically I make the design , 3.5” W x 4” H but it can be longer if the embroidery logo fits..but try to center it to the best of your ability. If you would like to use the software to see if the design will fit , you have the option of viewing hoops in your embroidery digitizing software. In here you can pick the different styles of hoops.

diver361

diver361

 

Embroidery on Towels


I seem to do quite a few towels for corporate sponsors and for gifts especially around Christmas time, I am a niche embroider, my specialization is jacket backs, carpets and specialty items. However towels can offer a extra opportunity for your customers. When embroidering on towels I always use tearaway, whether I am sewing on golf or fishing towels, bath robes or bath towels. I also use topping on towels that have a high nap to them. If you sell towels in your store make them more attractive and package them with a inexpensive basket, I like displaying my blank towels in a basket like the one below, i also have samples of monograms and machine embroidery designs that can be personalized. Sell the whole package. Topping is a clear water soluble material, that holds the embroidery threads of the nap down, so your presser foot will not catch them. If your presser foot catches them, it can cause the thread to pull out. When embroidering on towels there is no right or wrong however we have a guide that has some guidelines Placement guide for towels Because towels can often be heavier I would recommend using a medium tearaway type of backing. This usually will give the garment enough stabilizer, I have heard that some people sew without any but I always use it. If you have any wooden hoops or one inch plastic hoops I would recommend using them. I will normally use my wooden hoops for sewing on towels the screw offer more flexibility than the plastic hoops.   Digitizing for Towels When digitizing for towels there are several thing you should get in the habit of. First I recommend quite a bit of underlay, I normally use perpendicular and zigzag when doing towels, this will help build up the design it also preps the material for the stitches really well, on towels with a high nap I may also increase the density of the underlay. The topping will help as well I also like to use pull comp at .02 inch absolute I find this will compensate for the fullness of the towels. I also like the density to be 75 spi I find this will eliminate the nap or the strands of the towel showing through the letter. When I can I use .15 to .30 thickness of letters about 2 to 3 inches high for monograms and for customer logos I use 3 to 4 inches high and about 5 inches wide. Outside the box In many embroidery shops we stick to what has been tested over and over again, hover there are new techniques and niche markets that may be available to you, house coats are very similar to towels , depending on the material and sometimes you can package them together. First you will need to find a good source of towels, bath robes, as the price point will often make it hard to compete with large companies, however if you find a source, contacting upper class, hotels, spas, and specialty clinics you can offer a wide range of custom embroidered items. Tips When working with towels its important to compensate for how plush the towel or robe is, how much nap or length of fibers and density, Regular embroidery designs will not have enough underlay or density for this application. I recommend you try different densities on your machine when embroidering towels or robs and try using zig zag stitch to hold down the nap.. If you need more underlay to build up the stitches add perpendicular on top of the zig zag stitch. Topping On some towels you may find the need for the use of topping, usually its a water soluble topping that you lay on top of the towel prior to stitching, this will hold the nap down when embroidering. Sometimes the presser feet will catch a strand an pull it, this will eliminate that.   Author: Frank Prokator

diver361

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Sierra Embroidery Office 15 Pre realise обновление


1 октября 2014 года девелопперская компания Sierra (Буэнос Айрес Аргентина) объявила о выходе новой версии программного обеспечения для создания машинной вышивки. Эта вопреки логике имела номер не 12 ( как логично было бы предположить, поскольку предыдущая версия была 11) , а получила номер 15. Поскольку это пре релил до 10 детября 2014 года были объявлены специальные условия для обновления предыдущих версий. Так чистое обновление версии эдектронным методом ( загрузка полного пакета с вебсайта производителя- объем 570,355 Kb) от предыдущей версии Sierra Embroidery Office 11, мне обошлось всего в 180 долларов. Внимание: Эта оплата не включает в себя тренинг ( не понимаю как они организованы - поэтому решил не платить) и круглосуточную техническую поддержку ( по предыдущему опыту знаю , что от нее толку не много). Загрузка обновление и установка всех компонентов заняла около часа. При этом новый пакет сохраняет все предыдущие настройки (даже по мелочам ввиде последней использованной заливки) и купленные дополнения. Визуально при первом взгляде обновлений не так много. Даже многие инструменты и кнопки остались прежними. Версия без проблем запускается в 64 битной среде. При этом время запуска программы заметно выросло. Из главно экрана теперь открывать последние редактированные дизайны. Написать в тех. поддержку. Загрузить обновление (если оно есть). Но это только визуально внешние мнения. Хотя внутренние изменения гораздо серьезнее. Как я уже написал, версия стала грузится заметно быстрее. Исчезло задумчивость программы при открытии файла ( у меня оно иногда доходило до минуты, поскольку я использую для работы планшет Wacom, и программа какое то время пыталась открыть его как USB носитель).   Первые изменения которые мною были замечены в первые дни работы. Добавился новый тип укрепляющего слоя - центральный и по краям (center and edge). Переработаны окна выбора заливок (fill) и застилов. Появились возможность выбора часто используемых или тех которые вы выбрали как favorites. Добавлен широкий арсенал инструментов работы с пайетками (sequin).. В том числе,и заливки с различными настройками. Из главных исправлений. которые дейсвительно обрадовали. это иструмент конвертации векторного изобюражения в вышивку. Не секрет, что именно в 11 версии программного обеспечения, в нем имелся серьезный недостаток, инструмент не показывал внутренние контуры , после конвертации объекта в вышивку. Это серьезно усложняло применение таких инструментов как Elastic Fill при создании замкнутых объектов с несколькими направлениями стежков (классический пример буква О). Поскольку это не окончательная коммерческая версия, в ней наверняка пристутсвуют проблемы и баги. Так как компания Sierra так и не опубликовала полный список новвоведений и улучшений в данной версии. Поэтому мы будем исследовать ее самостоятельно и сообщать как об улучшениях так и проблемах.

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Tips n Trick, Introduction to Advance techniques


BORING TOOL   NOTE: This chapter will be covering some advanced options for Maestro users, however to the full benefit of this chapter you will the Boring tool, cording tool, for your machine. This tool can be used for decorative stitching, by placing holes in the garment and embroidering around them. You will need to check with your Distributor if your embroidery machine supports the hardware and get the option in your software, standard on Tajima Pulse Maestro optional on Tajima Illustrator Extreme. INTRODUCTION Depending on your line of work and digitizing path you may or may not need to learn this tool. Its designed for the decorative digitizer that either does fashion, home furnishing production pieces etc. If you find yourself doing corporate logos you will not need this option. However a lot of home embroiders, craft embroiders and fashion embroiders could use this feature to add some styles to their embroidery designs. BORING TOOLS The boring tool style presents a beautiful eyelet characteristics, boring lends itself to the home furnishing and fashion apparel decorating markets, specialty areas like ladies fashions you can incorporate this style of stitches for those embroidery designs. Its critical when using the boring tool to make sure your garment or raw material is tight in the hoop as the tool will tend to stretch the fabric or put pressure on the fabric. Magnetic clamps work great for this application. Tips on ideas for boring the general rule for boring decorative holes are small is better than large. The larger holes can distort the fabric and cause some alignment issues. generally 5 to 7 mm holes are a good size. Note when digitizing for the boring holes the needle sits 12mm in front of the knife blade for the holes so the design will need to be offset by 12 mm to line up the design. You also need at least 2mm spacing between holes. This tool takes quite a bit of practice to line up the embroidery design with the holes. See Artwork Design below. TAJIMA DGML by Pulse Option In your Tajima DGML by Pulse embroidery digitizing software you will have 3 boring tool options Triangle , Oval and a square. When working with these tools you will to make sure your density is between 70-90 spi to get the desired shape of the design,.saving stitches here will likely cause distortions. NOTE: the reason you need a lot of stitches for this application is the stitches pull back the fabric and hold it in place, the knife or boring tool doesn't remove the fabric but pierces it, the satin stitches pull the fabric back and tuck it in, thus the reason the embroidery stitch density must be strong enough to hide and cover the fabric edges. BORING TIPS - If sewing several holes together, sew manual underlay all at once for all the sections. If sewing other heavier designs elements near the bore hole, sew the boring holes first, this way the holes will not be covered by the other components. if doing an eclipse or oblong holes, sew the satin stitch at an angle to the holes edge rather than perpendicular to it, this will grab any extra threads and pull them in. Always use underlay so the fabric and its backing material won't shift and the cause the hole to close up. EXAMPLES The boring tool is a great attraction for those who also do sequins as you can get a lot of diversity using both these tools. Sequins are covered later in this chapter. CORDING TOOLS Most of you think of unique embroidery processes as being applique, puffy foam and tackle twill. Those are actually categorized as applications rather than processes. Processes typically involve a special attachment that enables a machine to produce a different type of embellishment. Unfortunately, very few shops make use of, or even know about, such options. One of those unique processes that has been around for quite a number of years is cording. This process is simply the attachment, through the stitching process, of a small cord or rope to the item being sewn. The selected cording material is stored on a spool and fed down to one of the machine needles which has been modified slightly. The needle doesn’t sew with the cord, but rather, uses embroidery thread to stitch the cord to the garment. Contact your dealer for options. Cording is a relatively simple process and easy to embroidery digitize for. Basically, you will just create running stitches in the areas where cording is to be applied, to sew the cord into place. However, keep in mind that the automatic trimmers do not trim the cord, only the thread being used to attach the cord. CORDING TOOLS So, the cording portions of a design must be continuous without jumps or trims, as the machine operator will have to stop and manually trim the cord with scissors. In addition, tight circles and curves should be avoided. Some designs can use heavy thread or even wire. In your embroidery digitizing software you can switch between standard embroidery to the Lock Stitch Chenille depending on your equipment and setup. For mixed mode machines its very simple just selecting a needle color for the machine. Cording Tool You can use the cording tool as a run stitch via the left design or program it with a zig zag stitch on the right side. On the machine side you can control the swing pattern , consult the manual of your embroidery machine. Cording Tool Examples of pattern 1 Tip ... You have to make sure that the stitches are not to sharp, the minimum stitch is 1.5 mm and the maximum stitch should only be 5 mm.. Each of the techniques can open up new markets, research them when buying new embroidery equipment.   Author: Frank Prokator

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Digitizing, Introduction to sequins and settings.


Sequin Introduction Sequins are easy to digitize with the newer software, once you understand the basic and rules for digitizing. In your Tajima Pulse software the tools will automatically lock the sequins, you can choose a variety of sizes and styles for spacing them. So you need the hardware for your machine, usually you can add it on after the fact, check with your distributor, for information. If you plan to punch using the manual sequin tool then you will need to know how to tie it off when placing your stitches. The automatic tools do this for you. General Rules - Don't use short stitches , you need to allow for the spacing on the sequins and the stitches for the machine. If you use short stitches you will run into needle breaks , embroidery thread breaks etc. - Take time with your artwork making it accurate as possible. - When ever possible use the automatic sequin options - Costing sequins will slow your embroidery down and you cannot cost it by stitch count as their are very few stitches. Sequins are applied using a special electro mechanical device that mounts to the head of a machine at the needle #1 location. A sequin wheel, containing a ribbon of sequins, is attached to the device and the ribbon is fed down to the sewing needle. When engaged, the sequin device enables the sequins to be sewn to the garment using a series of “tie” stitches. “Tie” stitches are essentially a set of small run stitches, usually three per sequin, that overlap the edges of the sequin and secure it firmly in place. You can purchase the option in Illustrator for the sequin and you can purchase fonts as well once you have a sequin attachment.   Sequin Fonts   Sequin Tool The sequin tool is based on the Bezier drawing mode, to review the different drawing modes, you can press B bezier on your keyboard , The fundamentals video we recommend everyone set the software to quick draw mode which is Q on the keyboard .. However for the sequin tools your best to use the bezier tools. Create a string of sequins by simply drawing the shape along where the sequins have to be dropped. It’s just as easy as creating a run stitch. Or, Import artwork and convert to Sequin in one easy step. You will need to know what size of sequins you are using so can adjust the space for them   Spacing options for how close the sequins are to each other can be controlled via the properties. TIP For sequins use mm for measurement its easier value to work with for this tool.   Sequin Tool In your software you can easily control the colors of the sequins, color change option.. There are various types of styles that you can use for sequins and tack down see below; Another options is you can add repeats to the sequins for the tack down used Sequin Tool In your software you can control the placement on the line, and the length much like fit to box .. You can control the tie off for both starting the sequin, and ending the sequence which can be set up to be automatic. In addition you can control the which way the tack down is placed ie North face tack down. And you can control the start and stop position of the sequin.   Run Stitch length for the sequin tools You can convert any artwork files to sequins , please make sure your artwork is clean as it makes the conversion easier than trying to edit it after the conversion. Simplify it when possible and allow space for the size and type of sequins. Sequin Fill Tool If you need to have a filled in area , the sequin fill tool allows you to space, offset, fit to shape etc. Very easy to use to convert artwork shapes to sequin fills. You can control the fill pattern like normal fills including having the sequins align straight or like the wave tool.   Sequin Fill Tool You can control the line spacing, pattern offset and traveling route, traveling direction fill tolerance, edge connections. Disclaimer Always check with your machine manual for options and setup of all settings the information in this manual is based on theory not on production. We do not have a machine to test or setup the embroidery designs.   Aurthor: Frank Prokator

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Tajima DG15 by Pulse new features and screenshots


Tajima Pulse version 15 new release! In the new version, we have improved many embroidery features of the program so you will have an increasingly productive tool compatible with new technologies. Have also improved integration with other apparel decoration specialties, making this version the most powerful multi-decoration professional embroidery digitizing software of the market. New features in Tajima DG15 to help increase your productivity include: Superior Anchor Point Functionality New Fill Options for Wave Effects and Complex Fills New Slice Options: Breakup, Rectangle Slice Advanced Quotation Estimator Increased Snapping Functionality Vertical Text Capability Touch-Screen Support Best Sequin Features in the Industry New Monogramming Wizard Accessible from your mobile device Superior Vector Features Users are easily able to add multiple anchor points. Anchor points can be quickly converted by pressing control and right clicking. Cusp to Smooth Smooth to Straight (results in Cusp) Symmetric to Smooth This new function helps users doing embroidery designs for carbon layer. Select one or more nodes with the Vertex Select Tool and right click on one of the selected nodes to open a function list for nodes. The Move Anchors option in this list allows users to enter values for selected nodes to be moved. Alignment features have been added for the following: Vertical alignment to top, bottom and center/none
Horizontal alignment to left, right and center/none Breakup can now be applied to virtual slice segments. This feature will breakup each sliced section. After breaking up, virtual slicing is lost and user can only use combine for branching. Rectangle Slice Tool has been created. New Fill Options for Wave & Complex Fills Standard and carved fills can be used together with a wave effect. This means that wave fills maintain the pattern assigned to them and do not distort the embroidery pattern. Revolving complex fill. Stitches generate in a revolving path Complex Fill Modifier will have repeats and patterns mirror those in complex fill. During stitch generation, it collects the overlapping outlines and settings and modifies the complex fill stitch generation in those overlapping areas.   Improved Quotation Estimator Users can rotate the 3D embroidery design image within the Quotation Estimator. This feature allows the user to pre-populate information from previously entered/stored customer data. Increased Snapping Functionality Users have the ability to select nodes and snap them to an art segment or snap them to grid. When modifying a segment snap to guidelines on the canvas. Snapping to anchor points is now available. Vertical Text Capability A Vertical Text Tool has been added. This tool includes vertical spacing between characters. The default value is 25% of the reference height of the embroidery font. Vertical text can be adjusted using vertical justify New embroidery machine integration features Display messages to machine operators on the controller through your design Set the maximum speed of the machine through your design Using the Latest Technology • DG15 takes advantage of the latest hardware and operating systems with powerful 64-bit processing and CorelDRAW X7 support PulseCloud lets you to create, manage and browse your machine embroidery designs from multiple devices. Moving into the cloud opens the door for various mobile and social possibilities, enabling you to take your business on-the-go and access your designs and machine status securely on multiple devices. • Browse your embroidery design portfolio • Create new embroidery designs and change text from templates • Send embroidery designs to machines • Monitor embroidery machine status

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Embroiderying on leather

Embroidering on to Leather Embroidering on leather is one of the most sought after applications by high end customers, including sports fans, corporations and more. In this blog we will give you tips and tricks on how to work with leather to help familiarize your techniques. The problem with leather it comes it different thickness, and different cuts or skins, making your life a battle. Leather Thickness You will be asked to embroidery on different materials for different applications in the image below you will find a chart that indicates the different thickness of leather. Its very important that you compensate your needles and threads and the design for the different thicknesses. Soft Leathers When embroidering soft leathers you will find that they can take a wider range of stitches as they have a bit of give to them. I recommend using a adhesive with your backing , I also recommend a weaved med-heavy backing to hold the stitches from coming through the back. I often use a 30 weight embroidery thread and a 75/11 sharp needle for this application. I tend to slow the machine down to 400 rpm Thick Leathers On thick leathers, from 4 ounces and thicker I recommend using a 75/11 Titanium Teflon Coated Sharp point needle and a polyester thread, I also recommend a weaved med-heavy backing to hold the stitches from coming through the back. I tend to slow the machine down to 400 rpm I also try to stagger the stitch pattern and avoid underlay, when possible. Depending on the thickness you may need to go to a 80/12 needle or a 90/14 needle if you end up with this make sure your using 30 or 20 weight of thread to compensate. Hooping Leather Depending on the type of hoop your using , you may want to place tear away backing where your hoops are going to be placed on the garment this will reduce the amount of marks left of the leather from the hoops sliding against the surface. If you have a clamp or magnetic hoop they work the best. Design Characteristics When digitizing your designs I recommend using programmed fills, and or light densities to create patterns, large fills with dense areas will cause the leather to rip. Opt out on this using a heavier thread type to fill in the area. a 30 weight thread you can often get away with a density of 50 spi and a 20 weight thread you can get away with a density of 35 spi. If you can use satin stitches, stagger the over laps, change the stitch direction when ever possible this will eliminate some of the over lapped penetration points. Keep trims to a minimum. Alternate Methods If you have the option I would recommend embroidering the embroidery design on to a structured surface like felt and embroidering that on to the leather. This is great for sports jackets, motorcycle jackets, and similarly style of coats where it make not take a heavy design. Applique can be used to make the jacket look great. Finishing the Garment You need to take great care in trimming the leather, it will not give like other fabrics, On some leathers the machine may leave foot depressor marks, caused by the machine, if you get these use a soft brush or tooth brush and stroke the leather this will often take the marks out. If the leather has nicks in it you may want to get a dye similar color to the leather and treat those areas. Samples 1. Appliqued embroidery designs stitched on felt. 2. Stitched on the arm of a garment . Author: Frank Prokator

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Tajima Pulse learning: Securing your work


When embroidery digitizing or just doing text it very important that you understand trims and locks many times they go hand in hand as often if your applying a trim to a machine embroidery design, you should be applying a lock stitch. Depending on the type of garment the use and your personal preference you can choose to put locks around trim stitches. Definition Trims A trims is when the machine cuts the thread before moving to another part of the design, this also can be done manually on older machines,. Locks A lock or lock stitch is a tie off after a trim, this locks the stitches down so they are less likely to unravel. Trims When you start to embroider or digitize you may not have any personal preferences when it comes to trimming or applying lock stitches. Trims often appear like little scissor like icons when you have your commands turned on. Locks Most times you will use locks around trims as it can help prevent the stitches unraveling when the material gets pulled on. There are several types of rules for locks, and several different types of lock stitches. There are several rules that you can choose to apply I like to use Basic lock stitches for most of my embroidery designs. I like to use locks on all stitch types although especially when trimming. I only like to trim when its necessary or when I cannot avoid it. Depending on the applications and or material it vital for locks to be applied to trims, specially on performance wear, dance wear, field where or construction field any application where the garment is exposed to rubbing, abrasive conditions. Applying Trims and Locks When your punching a embroidery design , you can either setup recipes, for your personal preferences or you can add them as you punch. As often you will need to do as you punch a design as you can control where and how to apply the rules. Give example on a embroidery design I do not like trimming, however on text unless their touching I always trim. However I always use locks no matter the stitch especially when working with text, except for script lettering I will not trim in them but I will add lock stitches. When you have a segment in Tajima Pulse version 14 you can either add trims and locks at the top of the screen. Advanced Options In version Tajima Pulse 14 there is also a feature to place the lock stitch on the inside of the letter it past version the locks sometimes would stick out from side of the letter, to use this feature in the latest build of version Tajima Pulse14 in the properties section where your trims are, see below; This section is new if you check it it will place the trim starting inside the letter. This is a great feature for lettering.   Author: Frank Prokator

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Introduction to Chenille


What is Chenille ? Chenille embroidery is textured embroidery that is created by forming loop stitches on the top side of the fabric being embroidered. Using wool, cotton, or acrylic yarns, it creates a unique texture that sets your embroidery apart from common, everyday embroidery designs. What do you need ? You will need a digitizing level of the embroidery digitizing software, the option for Chenille and a Chenille machine, contact your distributor for information on Chenille machines and software packages. I recommend that you have Tajima Illustrator Extreme with the Chenille option pack and fonts. What units should I use? When working with Chenille its recommended that your units and density be set to the Metric system as it allows for easier adjustments on values. When using the Metric system every thing is a base of example 10 mm =1 cm one inch equal 2.5 cm or 25 mm. Recommend secondary tools In addition to using Tajima Pulse I would recommend you have Corel Draw for designing the vector files with all the offset set ready to go, I recommend Corel as you can bring the artwork in using the draw fusion tool. If you design all the embroidery designs you will have many more flexible tools for the artwork side before converting it into chenille, ( Optional) you can punch it in Tajima Pulse but it may be more time consuming. Chenille Stock Fonts When you purchase the Chenille option and font pack you will be given a few fonts , However you may want to check with your distributor about purchasing some of the specialty fonts available. Not all Chenille fonts listed are standard in the Chenille package. Check with your local distributor. Chenille Tools Depending on your level and whether you have the option for Chenille you may or may not have these tools. These embroidery software tools only work with the software for Chenille,regular embroidery machines do not need these tools.   Chenille Stitch Types When working with chenille its important to understand the different applications or types of stitches. In the image below we have high lighted different stitch type and what they look like, Chenille Tips When working with chenille you should have a good understanding of the settings, also you need to know how to use your vertex select tool, your artwork tools as its easier to convert artwork to chenille than draw with it. You will also need to know how to reduce nodes and edit the artwork for chenille. Computer Recommendations for Chenille Its very important to have a well tuned digitizing computer, I recommend a Pentium 4 or equivalent Quad core computer with Windows 7 or Windows 8 64 Bit with 8 to 16 GB of ram. I also recommend the fastest chip and at least a 64 MB video card for working on Chenille. If your computer is not fast enough you will have a lot of idle time when converting your large file, and or it will crash causing you to loose your work, the converting process is very taxing on the computer. Chenille Uses What can you use Chenille for often on sport jackets for racing teams, football , soccer team jackets and or specialized patches. It requires a solid structure to hold the wait, usually stitched on felt which is then stitched on to the jackets. How ever Letterman jackets can hold the stitching well.   Author: Frank Prokator

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Tajima Pulse experience: Three D of Digitizing

In digitizing machine embroidery designs its important to understand the embroidery design characteristics, this helps if you have taken some time of art courses as it can prepare you to look at the embroidery different. It also depends on the size, and quality of artwork you have to work with. In this blog we are going to look at the three "D" of digitizing, Depth Density and Dynamics. Whether a embroidery design comes from a line drawing, clipart or a photograph, you need to understand how to get the digitizing software to be able to recreate the density, depth and dynamics of the design. This is not an easy task as you really need to know some settings in your embroidery digitizing software. Lets take a look at a embroidery design and how it was made. ORIGINAL IMAGE AND DESIGN INFO LAYER 1 BACKGROUND LAYER 2 HIGH LIGHT OF TREES LAYER 3 DETAIL OF TREES LAYER 4 AND 5 GRASS AND FENCE LAYER 6 CHEST BACKGROUND LAYER 7 AND 8 DEPTH AND DYNAMIC OF THE CHEST LAYER 9 AND 10 CHEST HIGHLIGHTS AND ANTLERS LAYER 11 HIGH LIGHT OF ANTLERS LAYER 12 DETAIL OF ANTLERS LAYER 13 HIGH LIGHTS IN DEER HEAD COMPARISON FROM THE ORIGINAL IMAGE TO THE SEW OUT OF THE EMBROIDERY DESIGN. The image on the left is the original image supplied and on the right the sew out ,

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Tajima Pulse learning: understanding font icons


When learning the embroidery digitizing software its important to understand the different type of fonts that are included with your Tajima Pulse Software. In this blog we will cover what the font symbols mean, the limitations and options for the selected fonts.In the above image you will see that there are five distinct icons, lets go through and enlighten you on the font and uses. (1) The old style font , this style of font's were digitized in Tajima Pulse version 7 and they do not have any new style options and or flexibility, however they are still used as they are slightly different than the new style counter parts. In your digitizing software you will often see both the old style and new style listed underneath the other.. see below.   So what is the difference.. The old style fonts sew each letter from the left side of the letter to the right, the NEW style fonts allow you to sew both from the left side of the letter or the right side of the letter, this is good when putting text on a cap you can choose sew out from the center and it will automatically sew the letters on the left from right to left and on the right side left to right, eliminating the push in the wrong direction.   Both fonts will look very close to each other , The new style of embroidery fonts will also allow you to add some options that in the past were very complicated to do. Now these are simple in mind that they add another layer underneath but for most purposes you can add a AUTO SHADOW and or a SIMPLE BORDER to the text .. this option is NOT available on the old style embroidery fonts. DROP SHADOW   To add a drop shadow ( Level Specific ) you need to high light your text, go to the properties, go to Auto Shadow, and then check the Drop Shadow check box, and choose your x and y distance and choose your color. SIMPLE BORDER This option is level specific , to add the border you can simply go to your properties, Fill and border section and some option will be grayed out , however you may be able to change as indicated in the next image. In the above image you can see that if you check the ADD A BORDER , than you can set the offset, choose a color , change the density and adjust the thickness. Please note this is an ILLUSION as it adds another satin stitch underneath the other giving the impression that it has a border, due to the size limitation of the satin stitches you will have to judge the border relative to the overall size of the satin stitch used. ( Satin stitch is limited to .42 inch in column width) In Tajima Pulse some fonts will be labeled as secured, these are added to your device and have to be purchased usually independent of the level, although they are sometimes packaged in options from your distributor. You can also purchase embroidery fonts that you need.. Unsecured fonts are general fonts that come with the digitizing software. The last embroidery font options are what they specify and outline fonts, these will generally work with the Dynamic border option using the simple border In review this is a very simple option to simulate a border on text and for most non digitizers its allows you some flexibility to make a standard font into a two color font. Works great on hats. Tip.. make the foreground font density higher than the border density.   Author: Frank Prokator

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Tajima Pulse experience: digitizing tools advanced


We are going to take a look at some advanced tools that are available for Illustrator extreme and higher. In the above image I have high lighted the Tajima DGML by Pulse Illustrator Extreme level tools, The tool marked in red include , Cross Stitch Tool, The Cross Stitch Fill Tool, Star Tool, , Applique Tool, and Applique Cut Tool and symbols tool. The Tajima DGML by Pulse Maestro Level will have all the tools Cross Stitch Tool, Cross Stitch Fill Tool , Cascade Fill Tool, Fur Stitch Tool , Star Tool, Radial Fill Tool, Spiral Fill Tool, Applique Tool , Applique Cut Tool , Line Carving Tool , the Region Carving Tool, Symbol Tool, Manual Sequin Tool CROSS STITCH TOOL This tool is used for making border stitches or small sections utilizing a straight or curved line. This tool you can specify the grid spacing and some sew out dimensions, it acts similar to the programmed run tool. CROSS STITCH FILL TOOL This tool allows you to make filled in areas similar to a cross stitch pattern, it linear in the fill pattern, and can be used to simulate cross stitch designs and or when blending colors, I often use the cross stitch tool over top of a standard fill to simulate a grill on the front of a car, however it has many other uses as well. CASCADE FILL TOOL This tool allow you to fill any shape with a linear fill tool that fills in a shape with a run stitch with minimal overlaps produced. You can specify the spacing and type of run stitch used. FUR STITCH, This tool is basically a SATIN TOOL with some presents assigned to the design, this tool can be used to make some stunning embroidery designs if you take the time to plan your embroidery design out. The key using this tool is to make small grouped satin style stitches and layer them together. change the density and randomness of the fill tool for effect. In the design below the FUR STITCH was used hundreds of times, layered with different colors, and then topped off with a run stitch, this embroidery design is not for the faint at heart and with 22 colors 35 color changes, 101765 stitches, 6" W x 8" H it sews out great for those who have the patients. STAR TOOL this is a simple tool and it allows you to make simple star shapes or circular shapes with a fill change the density to get different embroidery effects. RADIAL FILL TOOL is great, its based on a SATIN TOOL so size is limited and you can offset the center point, I use this tool a lot for EYES on animals as you can easily make the eye appear to look in a direction. usually in combination wit the star tool. SPIRAL FILL TOOL the name explains it a spiral shaped fill using a run tool and you can set the gap distance and stitch length. see image above.. APPLIQUE TOOL this tool can be used to make any shape into an applique. This will automatically give you the option of the position stitch, the tack down stitch and the border stitch all from the drawing, you can import artwork and convert it to the applique and it will make all three layers. Can be used with easily applique from Stahls or if you have an ioline or similar cutter that you can cut twill on you can make your own applique designs. The border options can be any of the satin stitch, steil stitch a programmed run or e-stitch. APPLIQUE CUT TOOL, This is for exporting your applique drawings to a supported cutter. LINE CARVING TOOL this is a great tool when working with fills, I have used this a lot on designs where I need to change the grain or make the appear to be a cut in the design, works great across the fill , I use it for car doors, to simulate a break where the door opens, it divides the fill. see below. REGION CARVING , only works with carved tile fills and it basically allows you to put 2 fills in one area. See below. This tool can be tricky to use, draw your fill shape, make sure its on carved tile. Then draw your region fill.. press SHIFT G to force the software to generate, choose your pattern and press SHIFT G to generate again. SYMBOL TOOL this tool has a few hundred preset shapes usually basic in nature but readily available great for small detail that you need to add like stars, and leaves and similar designs , Click on the tool, choose your shape, size it and your done. MANUAL SEQUIN TOOL , This allows placement of sequins manually, To use this option you must have a sequin attachment for your embroidery machine. Doesn't work with embroidery portions.   Author: Frank Prokator

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Embroidery business: shop guide

In every embroidery shop you must have some financial understanding of how much money you need to earn to cover the cost of operating. This guide is geared to help individuals and or shops with figuring out their profits and pricing. We have made it form based and provide instruction on how to use it, this guide is FREE for anyone that wants to use it to help them get a grip on their pricing, designed for their shop.

We want to help everyone take the fear out of pricing for their needs, this also allows you to be more competitive as you will know where your money is being spent, we make the use charts, and forms all within the spread sheets, the first several sheets in the spread sheets are the forms this is wear you input your data, they include an expense form, machine form, garment information, design information. some forms will stay constant other forms will change per job you will be quoting.

This spread sheet will calculate cost per piece, time to produce, total job cost and much much more. Its a great tool for any shop. You will need a program like Microsoft Excel or a free program like Open Office to be able to use this program. It was made in Open Office which is a free program you can click on the link to get this office program.

This guide has fourteen pages , their are two documented pages of the guide, four forms for inputting data. Its critical that you take the time to setup these forms for your shop , your machine and your expenses. The garment form, and design form will change per job, its a great way to estimate job runs and expenses.
This guide is to simplify expenses, pricing and production in your shop, this fully customizable guide allows you to easily edit the information about your designs, your expenses and your machines. Fill out the the forms and it will then allow you to calculate pricing for your shop.
You will need to know basic calculations for your expenses, information about the designs, garment cost , and machine information. Everything else is preset in this spread sheet. All the calculations are built into this spread sheet.
Expense Form
The Expense Form is key to predicting your expenses which a lot of the calculations are based on, We use it to calculate what you need to make yearly, monthly weekly, and daily and hourly. Take the time to fill it out
Machine Form
This form is for you to put in the constant information about your machine, you should have knowledge of how long your machine takes to trim, make a color change, thread breaks, hooping time, regular RPM speed, number of needles, number of machines, number of heads.
Garment Form
This form will constantly change depending on the garment type, garment cost, preparation time, post production time in addition to shipping expenses and any other information with regard to the garment.
Design Form
This form will constantly change depending on the design job, you can get the information from your embroidery program, you should know the amount of stitches in the design, number of colors, size of the design, number of trims , number of color changes, number of heads, number of machines,
Garment Form
This form will constantly change depending on the garment type, garment cost, preparation time, post production time in addition to shipping expenses and any other information with regard to the garment.
Supply Form
This form is to record what backing price, and size of the roll, this allows you to calculate how much backing you will need and the cost, this helps you keep tabs on the cost of the job. (optional)
.ritz .waffle .s13{text-align:left;font-weight:bold;font-style:italic;color:#000000;background-color:#ffffff;font-family:arial,sans,sans-serif;font-size:10pt;vertical-align:bottom;white-space:nowrap;direction:ltr;padding:0px 0px 0px 0px;}.ritz .waffle .s9{border-bottom:1px SOLID #000000;border-right:1px SOLID #000000;text-align:left;font-weight:bold;font-style:italic;color:#000000;background-color:#ffff00;font-family:arial,sans,sans-serif;font-size:10pt;vertical-align:bottom;white-space:nowrap;direction:ltr;padding:0px 0px 0px 0px;}.ritz .waffle .s2{border-bottom:1px SOLID #000000;border-right:1px SOLID #000000;text-align:left;color:#000000;background-color:#00ff00;font-family:arial,sans,sans-serif;font-size:10pt;vertical-align:bottom;white-space:nowrap;direction:ltr;padding:0px 0px 0px 0px;}.ritz .waffle .s12{text-align:left;font-weight:bold;color:#000000;background-color:#ffffff;font-family:arial,sans,sans-serif;font-size:10pt;vertical-align:bottom;white-space:nowrap;direction:ltr;padding:0px 0px 0px 0px;}.ritz .waffle .s5{border-left: none;border-right: none;text-align:left;font-weight:bold;color:#000000;background-color:#ffffff;font-family:arial,sans,sans-serif;font-size:10pt;vertical-align:bottom;white-space:nowrap;direction:ltr;padding:0px 0px 0px 0px;}.ritz .waffle .s7{border-left: none;text-align:center;font-weight:bold;color:#000000;background-color:#ffffff;font-family:arial,sans,sans-serif;font-size:10pt;vertical-align:bottom;white-space:nowrap;direction:ltr;padding:0px 0px 0px 0px;}.ritz .waffle .s6{border-left: none;text-align:left;color:#000000;background-color:#ffffff;font-family:arial,sans,sans-serif;font-size:10pt;vertical-align:bottom;white-space:nowrap;direction:ltr;padding:0px 0px 0px 0px;}.ritz .waffle .s1{border-bottom:1px SOLID #000000;border-right:1px SOLID #000000;text-align:center;color:#000000;background-color:#00ff00;font-family:arial,sans,sans-serif;font-size:10pt;vertical-align:bottom;white-space:nowrap;direction:ltr;padding:0px 0px 0px 0px;}.ritz .waffle .s15{border-bottom:1px DOUBLE #000000;text-align:left;color:#000000;background-color:#ffffff;font-family:arial,sans,sans-serif;font-size:10pt;vertical-align:bottom;white-space:nowrap;direction:ltr;padding:0px 0px 0px 0px;}.ritz .waffle .s4{border-right: none;text-align:left;color:#000000;background-color:#ffffff;font-family:arial,sans,sans-serif;font-size:10pt;vertical-align:bottom;white-space:nowrap;direction:ltr;padding:0px 0px 0px 0px;}.ritz .waffle .s11{text-align:left;color:#0000ff;background-color:#ffffff;font-family:arial,sans,sans-serif;font-size:10pt;vertical-align:bottom;white-space:nowrap;direction:ltr;padding:0px 0px 0px 0px;}.ritz .waffle .s14{border-bottom:1px SOLID #000000;text-align:left;font-weight:bold;font-style:italic;color:#000000;background-color:#ffffff;font-family:arial,sans,sans-serif;font-size:10pt;vertical-align:bottom;white-space:nowrap;direction:ltr;padding:0px 0px 0px 0px;}.ritz .waffle .s3{text-align:left;color:#000000;background-color:#ffffff;font-family:arial,sans,sans-serif;font-size:10pt;vertical-align:bottom;white-space:nowrap;direction:ltr;padding:0px 0px 0px 0px;}.ritz .waffle .s10{text-align:right;color:#0000ff;background-color:#ffffff;font-family:arial,sans,sans-serif;font-size:10pt;vertical-align:bottom;white-space:nowrap;direction:ltr;padding:0px 0px 0px 0px;}.ritz .waffle .s0{border-bottom:1px SOLID #000000;border-right:1px SOLID #000000;text-align:left;font-weight:bold;color:#000000;background-color:#00ff00;font-family:arial,sans,sans-serif;font-size:12pt;vertical-align:bottom;white-space:nowrap;direction:ltr;padding:0px 0px 0px 0px;}.ritz .waffle .s8{border-bottom:1px SOLID #000000;text-align:center;font-weight:bold;color:#000000;background-color:#ffffff;font-family:arial,sans,sans-serif;font-size:10pt;vertical-align:bottom;white-space:nowrap;direction:ltr;padding:0px 0px 0px 0px;}.ritz .waffle .s16{text-align:right;font-weight:bold;color:#008000;background-color:#ffffff;font-family:arial,sans,sans-serif;font-size:12pt;vertical-align:bottom;white-space:nowrap;direction:ltr;padding:0px 0px 0px 0px;} A B C D E F 1 SHOP EXPENSES 2 MONTHLY COST YEARLY COST 3 FIXED EXPENSES 4 EQUIPMENT LOAN $0.00 $0.00 The total amount paid on loans for your shop relating to embroidery. 5 SHOP RENT $700.00 $8,400.00 Your rent for your shop and or 50% work space in your house. 6 PROPERTY TAXES $200.00 $2,400.00 Property taxes, for your business if you do not own it mark as zero 7 EMBROIDERY SUPPLIES $20.00 $240.00 Embroidery supplies expense includes, needles, backing, threads, topping 8 BUSINESS PHONE $25.00 $300.00 Business phone, long distance expenses, message service expenses 9 BUSINESS INTERNET $25.00 $300.00 Internet or a percentage of shared internet for your home. 10 WEBSITE $10.00 $120.00 Expenses for your website on a monthly. 11 OFFICE SUPPLIES $10.00 $120.00 Office supplies, printing invoices, worksheets, copying, floppies,pens and pencils 12 OFFICE EQUIPMENT $10.00 $120.00 Computer equipment, USB drives, 13 BUSINESS UTILITIES $200.00 $2,400.00 Utilities related to the business. Portion of your home expenses 50% 14 BUSINESS INSURANCE $50.00 $600.00 Insurance for the business and equipment 15 HEALTH INSURANCE $100.00 $1,200.00 Health insurance for you ( can be omitted if you have another source for it ) 16 BANKING CHARGES $10.00 $120.00 bank charges, certified checks, money orders and credit card charges 17 PAY CHECK $2,000.00 $24,000.00 its very important to pay yourself. 18 ADVERTISING $100.00 $1,200.00 Advertising, business cards, pamphlets etc. 19 20 YEARLY TOTAL $41,520.00

A B C D E F G H I J K 1 DESIGN INFORMATION 2 3 MACHINE BRAND TAJIMA 4 MACHINE MODEL TFMX C1508 NOTE : When adding up the number of heads or machines for this form please note if you have a 8 head 5 NUMBER OF NEEDLES 9 and a 6 head and a 1 head. Just add up the total number of heads and put machines as 1. This 6 NUMBER OF HEADS 1 form is not setup for different machines at this point. 7 MACHINE SPEED 600 8 NUMBER OF MACHINES 1 9 COLOR CHANGE TIME 5 10 TRIM TIME 5 11 MACHINE SETUP 15 12 HOOP CHANGE OVER TIME 10 13 POST SETUP TIME 15

A B 1 GARMENT INFORMATION 2 3 GARMENT TYPE GILDAN T-SHIRT 4 GARMENT MODEL 2000 5 GARMENT COST 2.25 6 GARMENT SHIPPING 15 7 NUMBER OF GARMENTS ON ORDER 12

A B C D 1 DESIGN INFORMATION 2 3 STITCHES 5450 4 TRIMS 14 5 COLORS 4 6 COLOR CHANGES 6 7 COST PER THOUSAND STITCHES $1.50 8 DIGITIZING FEE 8.175

A B C D 1 CALCULATION OF WEEKLY, DAILY, HOURLY COST OF OPERATION 2 3 NUMBER OF WEEKS PER YEAR 48 4 5 WEEKLY COST $865.00 6 7 NUMBER OF DAYS PER WEEK 6 8 9 DAILY COST $144.17 10 11 NUMBER OF HOURS PER WEEK 60 12 13 HOURLY COST $14.42

A B C D 1 CALCULATION OF PRODUCTION COST OF OPERATION 2 3 NUMBER OF SEWING HEADS 1 4 5 AVERAGE SPEED PER MINUTE 600 6 7 AVERAGE PRODUCTION MINUTES PER HOUR 30 8 9 TOTAL AVERAGE STITCHES PER HOUR 18000 10 11 MINIMUM COST PER STITCH 0.00080 12 13 MINIMUM COST PER THOUSAND STITCHES $0.80

A B C D E 1 Basic Production Time Calculator 2 3 General Machine Information 4 Trim Time (seconds) 5 5 Color Change Time (seconds) 5 6 7 Specific Job Information 8 Hoop Changeover Time 10 minutes 9 # stitches in the design 5450 stitches 10 average machine speed (spm) 600 (true) 11 # color changes in the design 4 12 # trims (not including color change thread trims) 14 13 14 Calculated Production Time using speed VS stitches only 9.1 minutes 15 16 Calculated Production Using More Precise Info 20.6 minutes 17 18 Unexpected Downtime (percentage) 5 % 19 20 Realistic Production Time For One Run 21.6 minutes 21 22 23 Difference Between Production Time Calculations 12.5 minutes 24 25 26 27 What Does A Thread Trim Cost? 28 Average machine speed (spm) 600-1200 600 29 Trim Time (seconds) 10 30 100 (per head) 31 32 Number of heads 1 33 100 34 35 36 37 What Does A Color Change Cost? 38 Average machine speed (spm) 600 39 Color Change Time (seconds) (seconds) 10 40 100 (per head) 41 42 Number of heads 1 43 100 A B C 1 Pieces Per Hour Method 2 3 Hourly Cost $14.42 (from Cost Analysis Sheet) 4 5 Estimated Sewing Time Per Item In Minutes 9.1 (from Production Time & Cost Sheet) 6 7 Calculated Number of Items Sewn in One Hour 6.6 8 9 Digitizing Fee 0.68 10 11 Minimum Cost Per Item $2.18 12 13 Garment Cost 2.25 14 15 Minimum Price Per Item $4.43

Full calculation: Shop Guide.pdf

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EOD 11 tip; Changing Density from the Option ribbon

You can change a section's embroidery density from the application's option ribbon. Follow these steps: 1. Select the section to which you are going to change the density. Click on the “Select Object” tool and on the section of your interest. Tool “Select Object” 2. On the corresponding ribbon, insert the new density value in the “Density (lines/mm)” cell, and press “Enter”. In the example we changed the density value from 4 to a new value of 6. 3.The section will change the density to the new value inserted. By taking the density value from 4 to 6 you will notice a bigger number of embroidery stitches in the section.

guyasyou

guyasyou

 

Tajima Pulse experience: Digitizing Small letters

Small Letter Introduction In this Blog we will discuss terminology, techniques and how to digitize small letters for best results. There is no one rule for all fabric when it comes to digitizing small letters as every fabric will sew out a little bit different and some experimentation will need to be observed. We have included some terminology to help you with terms and measurements. General Rules for small letters 1) Machine Settings: Approximate speed of 400 stitches per minute. 2) Needle Size: Use the smallest needle possible: 65/9 sharp 3) Thread: Use a lighter weight thread such as 50-wt cotton or 60-wt rayon. 4) Hoop: Use the smallest hoop that will fit the design properly. 5) Backing: Use extra backing. Add a heavy piece of tear or cutaway. 6) Spray Adhesive: Use spray adhesive on thin fabrics. Measurements In this document we will be using “mm” millimeters instead of inches as its easier to define the stitch length, and small measurements accurately. Here is a quick reference chart for you to use. 25.4 mm is approximately 1 inch
3/16 tall letter is approximately 4 mm tall
1/ 4 tall letter is approximately 6 mm tall
Tools Required To digitizing small embroidery lettering its recommended that you have and know how to use the following tools Run tool
Manual tool
Satin tool
Enhanced Column tool
Properties You should also be familiar with the properties windows and how to change the density and stitch length and pull compensation and be familiar with lock stitches and underlay. General Rules for digitizing small letters There are some general rules you should be aware of , but note they don't always apply but will the base line for making small lettering look good. Stitch length should not be less than 1 mm
For best results recommend using 65/9 needle and 60 weight threads
Use capital letters when all possible
Make sure the letters are connected , DON'T trim except in between words
Use manual underlay instead of automatic as it will push and pull too much
Don't use complex fonts when all possible the detail will not show up as much
Stitch Length When designing small text the golden fast rule is that you must maintain a minimum stitch length so your embroidery machine is able to sew the letters out, when you go below the minimum stitch length you may get undesirable results like holes or embroidery thread bunching up. In the figure below it shows where you should measure the art work to gauge your stitch length After measuring the capital E @ 10 mm high the stitch lengths should be greater than 1 mm in length a 1.9 mm, b 1.3 mm. c 1.5 mm, d 1.3 mm, e height of the letter is 10 mm When looking at minimum embroidery stitch length you will need to recognize that there are factors that can affect the out come even when the rules are followed. You will need to compensate for the push and pull compensation of the letters, and the underlay, and compensate for the material your sewing on. The rules indicate the minimum stitch length should be no more than 1 mm this is cause the embroidery machine cannot sew stitches beside one another that close. We recommend using a smaller needle 65/9 and a smaller thread for best results, 60 weight embroidery thread when all possible. On some materials you may need to increase the pull compensation so when the you sew 1 mm stitch it sews out at the 1 mm size without pull compensation it will sew out smaller and either bird nest or cause the embroidery machine to make a hole in the material. Note when sewing on Pique you may be able to get away with a stitch length of .8 mm but you must use a sharp needle Underlay When digitizing small letters do not use the underlay within the properties as it will cause undesirable results on your letters, automatic underlay cause to much pull and push on the letters and will cause the letters to look funny, keep the underlay to a minimum and manually ad it using a run stitch or manual stitch. You want to keep the underlay as basic as possible. When dealing with small lettering putting too much underlay will cause the stitches to push and pull too much to occur so you want to use just enough. On larger stitch length of 1.2 mm make sure there are no more than 2 passes, but when the stitches are 1 mm or less make sure the underlay only makes 1 pass or don't use underlay at all See above “e” Cornering Techniques When manually digitizing small letters you will want to pay special attention to the corners, unlike a regular text you don't want too many stitch around the corners or it will cause it to pucker and or put a hole in the embroidery design, you need to be delicate, we recommended using a mitered corner see below. Using the mitered corner will look a lot better do to the reduced stitch count and less overlapping of the stitches. Stitch Angel When digitizing small letters, you may run into situations where the embroidery stitches will be too long for the embroidery design of the letters, at these times you may want to change the angle of the stitches so you can make sure that the stitches are minimum 1 mm in length In the above illustration you can see that change the angle will allow for the stitch to meet the 1 mm length requirement. Some people will say that it will make the edge jagged but it not the case. Usually jagged edges are caused by not enough density or the underlay showing through. Special conditions When digitizing letters that have an opening in them like P D O B R you will need to alter the artwork or the stitches a bit so they don't join, there needs to be a gap as the stitch will sometime close up as they will expand to compensate see below. You will want to make 1 mm gap between 2 sides of the stitches Expansion When your digitizing small fonts with feet or tails your going to need to allow for expansion. Your going to want to make sure there is room for the expansion of the stitch as some stitch cause the material to push into one another. See Fig 1 An effect of the material pushing you will see the design sew out like Fig 2 Expansion can also cause the lettering to sew out crooked , when you manually digitize small letters you going to want to make the stitches all go the same way. Take a look at the path of the stitches

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Tajima Pulse learning: Managing font catagories


Font Categories This is a brand option for Tajima DGML by Pulse version 14 users, This allow you to catalog your embroidery fonts, I would recommend that you set them up as they are in the help menu to make it easier to find them. You will need the latest version of Version 14 14.1.1.5367 or newer. This will help you find the style of font for your job and manage your list. Putting your embroidery fonts into Categories 1. Start with a NEW page in your version 14 Go to " New File " Choose " Blank Design" Click " Ok " 2. Open the Font Categories Go to " Tools " Choose " Manage " Click on " Font Categories"   3. I recommend the following categories 4. In the Font Categories window Click on " New "   5. Name the font Go To " File Save as " Type in " Block Font " Click " Ok "   6. Add the Block Fonts Using the Help as a reference Select the Block fonts Click the top arrow     7. Repeat until all the block fonts are added TIP if you hold down the " control key " you can select multiple items at one time to make the process faster. Save the Font Go to " File " Click on " Save " 8. Repeat until you have all the categories added How to use the Font Categories 1. Start with a NEW page in your version 14 Go to " New File " Choose " Blank Design" Click " Ok "   2. Click on your line angle text tool . 3. Enter in the name " John " 4. To use the Font Categories Click the ... beside the font names It will show you a list like this   5. High light the category and select the font..   Author: Frank Prokator

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Tajima Pulse experience: Working with Large Letters

When working with embroidery designs you will come across some limitations on size of text, this is where some back ground information is very helpful. We will cover which Tajima Pulse Fonts have been digitized for larger sizes, how to make a standard letter larger and other options When working with text its important to know the limitation of the satin stitch. The maximum stitch length for satin stitches is .50-.54 depending on your embroidery machine, however I recommend no more than .40 inch as it will be come loopy. You will have to watch the sample sew outs on similar fabric to judge how large you can go with your lettering. To give you a hint your software has a section called "FONT HELP" In their they list all of "Pulse Fonts" and they have information on which fonts can be used and how large you can make them. Font Help 1. Open a new document 2. Go to help.. select fonts Find the font called 2 Col Athletic 75-150 font and view the properties. In the above image at the bottom right side of the screen it will show you the minimum and maximum size for this font. This font should work up to 5.9" in height without manipulation. Here are some examples of standard large embroidery fonts in your embroidery digitizing software, there are more. Two Color Block Min 0.98 inches/25 mm Max 2.56 inches/65 mm Two Color Greek Min 0.98 inches/25 mm Max 2.05 inches/52 mm Two Color Villanova Min 0.98 inches/25 mm Max 5.9 inches/150 mm Western 2 Min 1 inch/25 mm Max 4.92 inches/125 mm Well this is great but very limiting , what if you need a font such as Full Block which has a maximum height of 1.38 inches/35 mm , whether this is where knowing your digitizing software pays you back. Any font can be made to sew out large as long as you know what to do.. Put a letter L using the Full Block font on your screen make it about 5 inches high. You will see that alot of the stitches do not show up.. and if you measure the column with the ruler tool , the column width is .90 inch , (note sometimes the software will show it past the .50 inch ,you always need to know how wide the column is making sure its no large than .40 of inch, or it will have issues.) Now we can adjust the letter so it can be sewn at this size 1. Right Click and go to the properties. 2. Find the Satin Tab. 3. Change the Satin Pattern to Pattern 1 When working with large letters you will need to make sure your underlay, density and compensation is set for the type of embroidery design, fills tend to have a lot of PUSH or PULL on your fabric, you will need a fair bit of underlay like a contour stitch and possibly a zig zag stitch which will also help with the density. Make sure you use med/heavy cutaway for this type of machine embroidery design. For digitizers you can always digitize applique or make your own fonts. Author: Frank Prokator

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